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The Grand plan for the Broad museum

 

The three-story, $130-million building in downtown Los Angeles will be known simply as the Broad.

 

By Mike Boehm, Los Angeles Times

January 6, 2011

 

The architectural design that Eli Broad is scheduled to reveal Thursday in a news conference at Walt Disney Concert Hall wraps the museum housing his contemporary art collection in a porous honeycomb. The billionaire collector and philanthropist hopes the $130-million building will help bring about his vision of downtown L.A. as a bustling urban hive of culture and street life.

 

The three-story museum will be known simply as the Broad, although the Broad Art Foundation is its formal name. The wraparound bonnet of interconnecting concrete trapezoids is courtesy of New York architects Diller Scofidio + Renfro.

 

Lead architect Elizabeth Diller's term for it is "the veil," because it enables the museum to relate to its surroundings by providing slots through which visitors can look out on Grand Avenue, and passersby outside the museum can get glimpses of what's inside. Visitors will enter the museum at ground level, take an escalator bathed in natural light to the top-floor galleries, and return via a staircase from which they'll have views into what she has dubbed "the vault" — the storage facility on the first and second floor that will house all the art from the 2,000-work collection that's not on display or on loan to other museums.

 

"This is 40 years in the making," Broad said in an interview Wednesday at the Westwood offices of the Broad Foundations, alluding to the time when he and his wife, Edythe, began collecting art.

 

Last year, as Broad secured the various government approvals needed to change plans for the economically stalled Grand Avenue Project so that the museum could replace previously planned high-rise condos and stores on one of the project's parcels, the museum's working title was the Broad Collection.

 

"The idea was, if we called it the Broad Collection, people would say, `I saw the collection. Thank you,'" Broad said, fearing that the name would invite them to take a been-there, done-that attitude rather than considering the museum an attraction worth repeat visits.

 

The plan is to open in 2013 with about 200 of the best works from a collection that dates from the 1950s onward and is built around such luminaries as Jasper Johns, Robert Rauschenberg, Roy Lichtenstein and Andy Warhol. Then a cycle of rotating special exhibits will begin, each focusing in-depth on one of the artists the Broads have collected and occupying up to a third of the 33,000 square feet of exhibition space. Curators eventually may augment works from the collection with borrowed pieces that help fill out the story of an artist or a strand of contemporary art history.

 

The point of having a museum of one's own — assuming one has an estimated worth of $5.7 billion, as Forbes magazine estimates Broad does after having built his fortune building and financing homes — is to ensure that the art is seen and not stowed away.

 

"If you look at history, too many great collections ended up in storage and not being shown," Broad said. He noted that Glenn Lowry, director of New York's Museum of Modern Art, where Broad is a trustee, advised him not to donate his collection there because "I'll only show 30 or 40" of the works.

 

The Los Angeles County Museum of Art would have welcomed the collection, but in 2008, shortly before it opened its Broad-financed Broad Contemporary Art Museum, the philanthropist said his aim was to create a museum to house the art.

 

Factoring in construction costs, a $200-million endowment Broad is donating to the museum (it is expected to generate investment returns of $12 million a year, enough to cover its operating expenses) and the estimated market value of the collection, Broad says the gift comes to about $2 billion.

 

Broad says he hopes to begin construction on the museum itself by midyear, with a projected opening two years later. Construction on its $30-million parking garage will start sooner, he said. Broad is advancing $30 million for the garage, but the Community Redevelopment Agency of Los Angeles will gradually pay back his foundation and take ownership of the parking structure.

 

"I'm impatient," said Broad, who is 77. "I'm not getting any younger. We don't want this to be a memorial building." ........

 

http://www.latimes.com/entertainment/news/la-et-broad-museum-news-20110106,0,6213392.story[/Quote]

 

Autre article

 

http://www.latimes.com/entertainment/news/la-et-0106-broad-museum-design-20110106,0,6905323.story

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Ce que je remarque et que je trouve intéressant est la grande participation du privé. En fait, si je comprends bien, le musée sera entièrement financé par le privé dont Eli Broad lui-meme au travers de sa fondation. C'est une chose qui manque cruellement à Montréal. Ici on peut questionner le design du futur musée mais il faut avouer qu'il est intéressant que des gens y mettent leurs énergies et une partie de leur économie.

 

À noter que l'emplacement du musée était désigné pour une tour à condo mais que le projet à surement avorté.

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Ce que je remarque et que je trouve intéressant est la grande participation du privé. En fait, si je comprends bien, le musée sera entièrement financé par le privé dont Eli Broad lui-meme au travers de sa fondation. C'est une chose qui manque cruellement à Montréal. Ici on peut questionner le design du futur musée mais il faut avouer qu'il est intéressant que des gens y mettent leurs énergies et une partie de leur économie.

 

À noter que l'emplacement du musée était désigné pour une tour à condo mais que le projet à surement avorté.

 

Et voilà une autre bonne raison pourquoi iol faut améliorer notre situation économique au Québec. Si il y avait plus de riches, ils y aurait plus de dons pour ce genre de chose. Regardez ce qui se passe à Toronto. Ils sont en train de se construire plusieurs cetres culturels, salle d'opéra, salles de spectacles (LightBox) et je crois que la majorité sera financé par le privé!

 

plus d'argent = plus de culture!!! ;)

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Et voilà une autre bonne raison pourquoi iol faut améliorer notre situation économique au Québec.

 

Je ne crois pas que ce soit une affaire purement de situation économique car l'économie du Québec, avec tous ses problèmes, est en bien meilleur santé que celle de la Californie. Je ne voudrais surement pas etre dans leur situation.

 

Par contre je crois que c'est une question de mentalité ou les ''riches'' du Québec n'ont pas le meme désir d'investir dans la communauté et dans le culturel comme d'autres ailleurs. Peut-etre que ca viendra, d'ailleurs c'est déjà commencé avec Saputo et Molson mais il reste encore beaucoup à faire. PKP, Laliberté, Coutu, Bombardier, Lemaire, Jarilowski, Azrieli, Martin, Desmarais, Van Houtte, entre autre, peuvent faire mieux. Je sais que certains ont déjà fait mais pas au meme niveau que ce qu'on peut voir ailleurs aux USA.

 

Si il y avait plus de riches, ils y aurait plus de dons pour ce genre de chose. Regardez ce qui se passe à Toronto. Ils sont en train de se construire plusieurs cetres culturels, salle d'opéra, salles de spectacles (LightBox) et je crois que la majorité sera financé par le privé!

 

Je ne sais pas pour Toronto mais est-ce que le financement de ces infrastructures proviennent majoritairement des poches du privé ou si c'est le gouvernement ?

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