Jump to content

Recommended Posts

Not sure if this really counts as a renovation of sorts. Cineplex is planning on fixing up one or more cinemas with their UltraAVX. Plus the larger seats are supposedly in pleather. Whats funny that Montreal and Canada are finally making the cinema experience more upscale. In Mexico and Thailand certain cinemas have been like this for years. Especially the ones in Bangkok at the mall called: Siam Paragon (massive mall). The Paragon Cineplex in the mall has 15 screens. 1 of them only for members called: Enigma.

 

One of them in Ontario or something is open to people only 19+ because they serve alcohol in one of the cinemas also they have food delivery to the seats.

 

ultra03.jpg

Edited by jesseps
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Some info I found...

 

Coming soon to a Cineplex Entertainment (TSX:CGX.UN) theatre near you: as many as eight different ways to see a movie, and the ability to reserve a seat in advance.

 

For an extra $3 you can ensure you don't get a kink in your neck from getting stuck in the front row.

 

That extra surcharge is part of the UltraAVX experience that recently launched in seven theatres in Brampton, Ont., Calgary, Edmonton, Mississauga, Ont., and Toronto. Cineplex is planning to expand the feature to Chilliwack, B.C., Montreal, Ottawa and Toronto.

 

The special UltraAVX theatres also include huge wall-to-wall screens, a better sound system and larger seats that recline.

 

"(We asked customers if) they were to create the ideal viewing environment what would it be and they said, 'Big screens, great sound system, comfy chairs and the ability to reserve our seat in advance,"' said Pat Marshall, Cineplex's vice president of communication.

 

So far, those UltraAVX screenings have been selling out regularly, she said.

 

"It seems we cannot add them fast enough."

 

Those who have a hard time making decisions might be a little flummoxed by the bevy of options at Cineplex's larger theatres nowadays, which often screen more than a dozen movies at a multitude of price points.

 

Will that be regular admission, 3D, IMAX, IMAX 3D, UltraAVX, UltraAVX 3D, or VIP seating with bar service?

 

And later this month there will be one more option -- for an extra $8 -- in select theatres. Cineplex has signed a deal with D-BOX Technologies Inc., (TSXV:DBO.A) to install interactive seats that move and rumble along with the action on screen.

 

Movie-goers have long complained about the rising price of admission and snacks.

 

But James Leask of Edmonton said he didn't mind paying more, especially with the convenience of reserved seating, which he'd previously experienced and loved at a theatre in Los Angeles.

 

"It's really great to not have to worry about getting there an hour early for a new movie," said Leask, who recently saw a free screening of "Secretariat" in an UltraAVX theatre and liked the experience so much he went back to see an action movie in the same venue.

 

"I just like the security of not having to make a jacket stretch across four seats when people go to get snacks.

 

"It's a nice little bit of comfort."

 

Cineplex has previously offered reserved seating during special screenings of the Metropolitan Opera. Filmgoers may not have noticed, but seats are typically already numbered, so retrofitting was not required.

 

"Again, that was in response to our guests asking for the option, so we created that there," Marshall said, and added that Cineplex will consider expanding the reserved seating option in the future.

 

"We certainly will look at everything moving forward, I think it's just a matter of where and when it makes sense."

 

Over the next 12 months Cineplex is installing D-BOX seating at 10 theatres across the country. It'll be in place at three theatres in Montreal, Quebec City and Toronto in time for the Nov. 19 release of "Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 1."

 

Cineplex is also planning to expand the number of its VIP adult-only theatres -- which charge an extra $5 per ticket -- from the three it runs in Ontario.

 

(Courtesy of CTV News)

 

I can't wait for the VIP Service.

 

dbox1.jpg

D-Box seat.

Edited by jesseps
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Donc en gros ils remettent les écrans à la grandeur qu'ils étaient avant l'arrivée des mégaplexs et appellent ça "upscale".

 

Et j'avais pensé dernièrement à la réservation de sièges... et je me suis dit que finalement, ça ne pourrait que faire de la merde. Imaginez si tout le monde réserve à un banc de distance. Ça va faire plein de gens ensemble qui devront se séparer parce que ceux qui ne voulaient pas attendre en ligne comme tout le monde ont réservé leurs sièges.

 

Le cinéma est un art populaire, pourquoi est-ce que certains doivent toujours tout tourner en exclusif et autres VIP? Est-ce que la personne "commune" est si désagréable?

 

Si vous êtes prêts à payer plus pour avoir des sièges qui s'inclinent et pas de jeunes... y'a toujours les cinémas maison. Avec ça, vous pourrez entièrement exclure l'aspect collectif de l'expérience cinématographique.

Edited by JFrosty
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Si vous êtes prêts à payer plus pour avoir des sièges qui s'inclinent et pas de jeunes... y'a toujours les cinémas maison. Avec ça, vous pourrez entièrement exclure l'aspect collectif de l'expérience cinématographique.

 

I am waiting for the day that movie studios do direct to home screenings for people to lazy to go to the cinema.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 4 months later...

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

  • Similar Content

    • By Chris1989
      https://youtu.be/9j13lvyYWXU 
      My newest video, featuring tourists trying smoked meat at Schwartz's for the first time. It's one of my favourite places in town, so I'm glad I was able to find enough footage to make it work. There's definitely some great reactions in here!
      I was also able to include a really cute moment with Céline Dion asking about the secret recipe.
      I'm going to try and make at least one MTL-specific video a month and post it on my channel. Please Share if you like it!
      If you have any ideas on what my next video should be about, or you would like to direct me to a video you stumbled upon, let me know! Thanks everyone.
       
    • By mtlurb
      Vibrant Montreal brings new Canadian rock sound to world scenes
       
      Posted on Thursday, May 10, 2007 (EST)
      Montreal, the Canadian city known for its fierce winters, has become an international hotspot for a new wave of indie bands.
       
       

      The Montreal band "Arcade Fire" during a performance
      © AFP/GettyImages/File Kevin Winter


       
      PARIS (AFP) - Led by trailblazers Arcade Fire, guitar-wielding groups have been touring overseas, winning fans and have everyone wondering about the secret of the city’s sudden success.
       
      Alongside the rock scene, electronic acts such as DJ Champion, Kid Koala and Tiga have made "based in Montreal" a fashionable stamp of quality.
      In the process, the image of Canadian music, once dominated by pop crooners Bryan Adams and Celine Dion, has been redefined.
       
      "Montreal is an extremely cosmopolitan and open city," said homegrown singer Pierre Lapointe, giving his reasons for the new vibrancy.
       
      "We couldn’t care less about origins. What we look for is good music and interesting ways of doing things," he added during a stop in Paris.
       
      Montreal is home to about two million people, making it the biggest city in the French-speaking eastern province of Quebec.
       
      Music journalist and commentator for Canadian cable channel MusiquePlus, Nicolas Tittley, puts the vitality of the guitar scene down to North American influences.
      The Montreal band "Arcade Fire" during a performance
      © AFP/GettyImages/File Kevin Winter


       
      "Rock, country, blues, folk. Basically, all the music movements linked to North America are not foreign for 'les Montrealais'," he said in an interview.
       
      Indie rockers Arcade Fire have sold a million albums worldwide, according to their record label, and fellow groups Wolf Parade, The Bell Orchestre, Patrick Watson, Stars, The Besnard Lakes or The Dears are following in their footsteps.
       
      The francophone movement includes Ariane Moffatt, Karkwa, Ghislain Poirier, Les Trois Accords and Malajube.
       
      Malajube is threatening to cross the language divide and break into English-speaking markets after the group’s new album "Trompe-l'oeil" won plaudits from US reviewers.
       
      Although Montreal is a majority francophone city, most people can speak (and sing in) both languages and the city is also home to a large, well-integrated ethnic population.
       
      "The openness that we have in Montreal is quite unique," said Laurent Saulnier, programmer for the Montreal International Jazz Festival and Francofolies de Montreal event.
       
      "Few cities in the world have access to so many sorts of music from everywhere: France, USA, Europe, South America, or Africa."
       
      The cross-over of influences and culture is also seen in the music collaborations.
       
      Pierre Lapointe, The Dears, Les Trois Accords and Loco Locass, a rap group similar to the Beastie Boys, make guest appearances on the Malajube’s album.
       
      Critics snipe that the hype will not last, but for the moment at least, a new, fresh face has been put on Canadian music overseas. ©AFP
    • By WestAust
      DURING the 2000 presidential campaign, the candidate from Texas fielded a question from Canada: “Prime Minister Jean Poutine said you look like the man who should lead the free world into the 21st century. What do you think about that?”
       
      When George W. Bush pledged to “work closely together” with Mr. Poutine, Montrealers fell off their chairs laughing. It wasn’t so much that the Canadian leader was, in fact, Jean Chrétien, but that the “reporter” — Rick Mercer, a television comedian — had invoked the city’s emblematic, problematic, comedic junk food dish: poutine.
       
      A gloppy, caloric layering of French fries, fresh cheese curds (a byproduct of Cheddar making) and gravy, poutine goes deep into the Quebequois psyche. Somehow, Quebec’s rural roots, its split identity (Acadian farmers or Gallic gourmets?) and its earthy sense of humor are all embodied by its unofficial dish.
       
      This may be one reason that until now poutine has not traveled well. True, it was on the menu for years at Shopsin’s, the quirky West Village restaurant that closed this year, but so was nearly every other known foodstuff. But recently, it has materialized in a handful of cities across the United States. In New York City, it is on the menu at three highly divergent establishments, and this time it shows signs of taking hold.
       
      Andy Bennett, the chef at the Inn LW12 in the meatpacking district, recalled his reaction on being told (by the Canadian faction of the inn’s owners) that poutine must be served. “I said, you’ve got to be kidding me. Then I realized I wasn’t going to be able to get away from it.”
       
      Mr. Bennett, however, was converted. “You have to embrace these things,” he said. “Now it’s our biggest selling item by a long stretch.”
       
      “I think it’s going to be across the city soon,” he said. “It’s going to stick without a doubt.”
       
      Mr. Bennett’s choice of words was apt. Poutine is an extreme stick-to-your-ribs concoction, whose name is said to derive from Quebequois slang. According to the dominant creation myth, in 1957 a restaurateur named Fernand Lachance, when asked by a customer to combine fries and cheese curds, said it would make “une maudite poutine” — an unholy mess. (And this was pre-gravy. Another restaurateur, Jean-Paul Roy of Le Roy Jucep, claims to have first served fries with gravy and curds in 1964.)
       
      Since Mr. Lachance’s death three years ago, poutine’s de facto spokesman has been Bob Rutledge, creator of the Web site MontrealPoutine.com. Mr. Rutledge, a professor of astrophysics at McGill University specializing in neutron stars, black holes and gamma ray bursts, first heard of poutine on moving to Montreal in 2004. He was instantly smitten.
       
      “When I started asking about it, I got one of two responses,” he said. “It was either: ‘Oh here’s my favorite poutine place; you must go...’, or else it was: ‘Oh my God, why do you want to eat that stuff?’ It’s a veritable food phenomenon; half the people are embarrassed it exists.”
       
      Siobhan O’Connor, a journalist who moved to New York from Montreal five years ago, has a different view. “The only people who don’t like poutine are people on a diet,” she said. “It’s the first thing you want when you go back, a real late-night post-drinking thing.”
       
      Ms. O’Connor recently sampled the new batch of New York poutines. The classic version at Sheep Station, an Australian gastropub on the western edge of Park Slope, initially struck her as too dry. But, on discovering that the Quebequois chef, Martine Lafond, had secreted further curds and gravy under crisp, hot fries, she warmed to it, declaring the gravy authentically peppery, salty and meaty, and the curds as fresh as could be expected so far from home.
       
      At Pommes Frites, an East Village storefront that traffics in Belgian fries but now has a sideline in their Canadian cousins, neither the rubbery, yellowish curds nor the lukewarm, flavorless sauce met with Ms. O’Connor’s approval. But Mr. Bennett’s four varieties at the Inn LW12 did, despite distinctly unorthodox stylings.
       
      “I’d come back here just for this,” she declared of the plate with five-spice gravy and chewy strips of pork belly, though she found the Stilton cheese in the rich, toothsome braised beef with red wine version to be overload and the herby marinara sauce on the tomato version — called Italienne back home — disappointing. Though somewhat overshadowed by its glitzy sisters, the classic, too, more than passed muster.
       
      Ms. O’Connor explained that poutine really belonged to the French speakers — her Irish-Montrealer mother, for instance, had never tried it — until “around 2000, when people started messing with it: green peppercorns, Gruyère, truffle oil...”
       
      According to Professor Rutledge, variations on the theme are fine. “They strike me as creative and interesting so I give bonus points,” he said. He is, however, from Southern California. The average Montrealer seems to be more of a purist.
       
      The chef Martin Picard, one of Montreal’s most high-profile culinary figures, embraces poutine at his restaurant Au Pied de Cochon. “That dish becomes an international passport,” he declared. “It’s not haute gastronomie, but it permits Quebec to get more interest from the rest of the world.”
       
      Mr. Picard said he occasionally offers classic poutine as a “clin d’oeil” — a wink — to Quebequois cuisine, but his version with foie gras is what everyone remembers. For this, the regular poutine sauce — a thick, highly seasoned chicken velouté, which Mr. Picard enhances with pork stock — is enriched by foie gras and egg yolks. The dish is crowned with a four-ounce slab of seared goose liver.
       
      Whether Montreal’s embarrassing but adored junk food does take root in New York, it may never attain the status it achieved earlier this year when the CBC revealed the results of a viewer poll on the greatest Canadian inventions of all time. Granted, poutine came in only at No. 10. But it beat, among other things, the electron microscope, the BlackBerry, the paint roller and the caulking gun, lacrosse, plexiglass, radio voice transmission and basketball.
    • By mtlurb
      Halifax could learn a lot from Montreal

      VICTOR SYPEREK
      The Daily News
      You know, as you travel through this wonderful country, you realize just how lucky we are to be Canadians. From the majestic Rocky Mountains to the restless Atlantic Ocean. And what diverse populations. Bringing the best from all of our homelands.
       
      Leaving Toronto and heading East quickened my heart, as heading home always does. This is probably what is so compelling about travel. All we see and eat and do can be brought home to add a little diversity to our verdant region.
       
      I stopped in Kingston, Ont., which was celebrating the last day of its Busker Festival. It's hard to say how big theirs is, as on the last day, everyone joins together in the main area to watch the best of the week. They had closed a large portion of the downtown and besides the theatrical antics, parking lots were 1/2lled with 3/4ea markets, antique sales, baking and general city groups adding to the fun.
       
      After a Guinness, a bite and a leisurely chat with some locals, on I pushed to Montreal.
       
      I used to live there about 30 years ago. After the referendum, big business left in droves. Many Anglos followed. Toronto surpassed Montreal as Canada's No. 1 city. I think they went a little over board on their French-only bent, isolating them even further. But a funny thing happened. Rents stayed low. Houses remained affordable. It was the perfect environment for artists and artist expression. Montreal became an incubator and gave birth to the largest comedy festival and one of the largest jazz festivals and, of course, the world's most famous circus troupe, Cirque du Soleil.
       
      To some degree, this is all serendipity, the right place and the right time. But that isn't enough. You still need the people with the control and the money to pave the way or, at least, remove the road- blocks. And I chose this word for it's meaning. Obviously a city must function at many levels. Business must function, deliveries must be made, people must get to work and home again. But these days tourism is big business and as well talented people must be attracted to our fair cities. Besides just jobs, we have to address quality of life. Now this means many things. Besides a comfortable and safe place to live, we have to do things. We need theatre, 1/2lm, good food and entertainment. And entertainment can be so many things - from buskers to book fairs, car shows, huge 3/4ea markets, a literal day at the beach and sailing. If we have a happy population, it shows. The tourists 1/2nd out and they come to see why. And at the bottom of it all, you will 1/2nd a progressive administration.
       
      As in Montreal, where the arts had the perfect place to be. Flowers won't grow without the proper conditions, they must be encouraged. Montreal gets it.
       
      During the jazz festival, most of Montreal's streets are closed around the arts centre. During the Grand Prix the Main St. Laurent is closed and turned into a giant terrace; bars and restaurants spill out onto the street.
       
      The comedy fest, for two weeks, shuts down the blocks from St. Laurent past St. Dennis, south of Sherbrooke. The area is the size of downtown Halifax. There were hundreds of thousands of people on the streets. Roaming troupes of stilt walkers, parade 3/4oats, lights everywhere, sound and long lineups at all of the venues. It was a festival 20 years in the making.
       
      About 20 years ago, in Halifax, Dale Thompson started the Buskers' Festival and Mardi Gras, a Halloween night to remember.
       
      Buskers were a downtown-wide street show. They were everywhere. What could have grown into something approaching Montreal's festival was safely place in a sterile (read boring) package on the crowded waterfront.
       
      Same with Mardi Gras. It got out of control. Instead of managing it, it was cancelled, or at least the cost of police and 1/2re control became prohibitive. There is something wrong with our attitude.
       
      Mayor Peter Kelly and a few councillors should go on a paid junket to Montreal to 1/2nd out how it's done. There is no need to recreate the wheel. It's been done in Rio, New Orleans and in Montreal.
       
      I saw very few police, just on the gates to the streets. A couple of 1/2remen leaning on their 1/2re truck were there just in case. And there were hundreds of thousands of people of all ages with smiles on their faces.
       
      Heck, I'll even offer to go with them as translator, to translate into common sense.
       
      The film festival in Halifax is in its 21st year and yet the city is still dithering over permits to use Parade Square and surrounding streets.
       
      This festival has the potential to put us on the international 1/2lm map, but we need the nurturing and help of our city fathers.
       
      And speaking of 1/2lms, I wish our 1/2lm development board would get off their chairs and try to stem the 3/4ow of production from Nova Scotia to New Brunswick and the rest of the country.
       
      This was a $200- million-a-year business. Now I know there are circumstances, but let's start with local production.
       
      A couple of weeks ago, I mentioned that I hadn't seen many cops walking the beat late at night. Well just to prove me wrong, there they were Wednesday night, handing out parking tickets.
       
      C'mon. What gives? We have a world hockey tournament or curling or the Greek Festival or whatever - and the parking commission has a 1/2eld day.
       
      You know, if they are not blocking a hydrant or some emergency exit or driveway, do we have to be so fanatical? If it weren't about the revenue, you know you will be towed, if necessary. Let's give our visitors a break. But I guess we have to pay for the parking at Dartmouth Crossing somehow.
       
      Well, I'm off to enjoy our jazz festival. It's good here, but it could be better. Have a good one.
    • By jesseps
      (Courtesy of Budget Travel Online)
       
      That was a little taste of the article. For more click on Budget Travel Online
×
×
  • Create New...
adblock_message_value
adblock_accept_btn_value