Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'women'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Real estate projects
    • Proposals
    • Going up
    • Completed
    • Mass Transit
    • Infrastructures
    • Cultural, entertainment and sport projects
    • Cancelled projects
  • General topics
    • City planning and architecture
    • Economy discussions
    • Technology, video games and gadgets
    • Urban tech
    • General discussions
    • Entertainment, food and culture
    • Current events
    • Off Topic
  • MTLYUL Aviation
    • General discussion
    • Spotting at YUL
  • Here and abroad
    • City of Québec
    • Around the province of Québec.
    • Toronto and the rest of Canada
    • USA
    • Europe
    • Projects elsewhere in the world
  • Photography and videos
    • Urban photography
    • Other pictures
    • Old pictures

Calendars

There are no results to display.

There are no results to display.

Blogs

There are no results to display.

There are no results to display.


Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


About Me


Biography


Location


Interests


Occupation


Type of dwelling

Found 13 results

  1. By Caroline Wyatt BBC News, Paris The reality of Paris does not always live up to the dream A dozen or so Japanese tourists a year have to be repatriated from the French capital, after falling prey to what's become known as "Paris syndrome". That is what some polite Japanese tourists suffer when they discover that Parisians can be rude or the city does not meet their expectations. The experience can apparently be too stressful for some and they suffer a psychiatric breakdown. Around a million Japanese travel to France every year. Shocking reality Many of the visitors come with a deeply romantic vision of Paris - the cobbled streets, as seen in the film Amelie, the beauty of French women or the high culture and art at the Louvre. The reality can come as a shock. An encounter with a rude taxi driver, or a Parisian waiter who shouts at customers who cannot speak fluent French, might be laughed off by those from other Western cultures. But for the Japanese - used to a more polite and helpful society in which voices are rarely raised in anger - the experience of their dream city turning into a nightmare can simply be too much. This year alone, the Japanese embassy in Paris has had to repatriate four people with a doctor or nurse on board the plane to help them get over the shock. An encounter with a rude Parisian can be a shocking experience They were suffering from "Paris syndrome". It was a Japanese psychiatrist working in France, Professor Hiroaki Ota, who first identified the syndrome some 20 years ago. On average, up to 12 Japanese tourists a year fall victim to it, mainly women in their 30s with high expectations of what may be their first trip abroad. The Japanese embassy has a 24-hour hotline for those suffering from severe culture shock, and can help find hospital treatment for anyone in need. However, the only permanent cure is to go back to Japan - never to return
  2. The small town of Triberg, Germany is creating big headlines these days, after its mayor designated a number of difficult or tricky parking spaces for men-only. Mayor Gallus Strobel has risked countless accusations of sexism after marking the town's toughest parking spots with a male or female symbol depending on their level of difficulty. "Men are, as a rule, a little better at such challenges... There are also great women drivers who are, of course, most welcome!" Mayor Strobel told German newspaper Süddeutsche Zeitung. The idea behind this new policy was designed to attract ambitious drivers to utilize more difficult spaces. Parking spaces which are wider, well-lit and close to exits have been painted with female symbols, while narrow, obstructed and awkwardly angled spots have been labeled with male symbols. So far the parking challenge has been met with mixed opinions, however its also increased tourism to the area, as countless drivers have traveled to the small town in order to test their parking abilities. A major study in Britain earlier this year showed that while women might be slower at parking, they are more accurate and have better technique. The survey also suggests men liked to "pose park" by opting to park in a smaller spots, even when a larger spot is available. http://worldnews.msnbc.msn.com/_news/2012/07/10/12664764-german-mayor-designates-parking-spaces-just-for-men?lite
  3. Canada falls behind in basic worker benefits: McGill study Doesn't measure up to other countries on sick leave, vacation time and breastfeeding breaks MIKE KING, The Gazette Published: 6 hours ago mike king the gazette Canada is perennially a top-10 finisher in United Nations rankings as one of the best countries in the world to live in. But a new McGill University study indicates that Canada lags behind many other countries on some basic worker benefits. The school's Institute for Health and Social Policy conducted recently an international survey that is the first research of its type to measure Canadian laws and practices vs. those of 180 other countries in such areas as maternity leave, annual paid vacations, sick leave and breaks for breastfeeding mothers. The Work Equity Canada (WECan) index, conducted by the institute's Jody Heymann, Martine Chaussard and Megan Gerecke, found Canada scores well for having policies that guarantee paid leave to care for dependents with serious illnesses. But Canada fared worse in other areas. The 78-page report notes: - In nearly 90 other countries, workers are guaranteed three weeks or more of paid leave a year, while most Canadian workers with a year's tenure are guaranteed only two. In Ontario, Prince Edward Island and the Yukon, even workers with long service are guaranteed just two weeks of vacation. - At least 156 countries provide leave for sick workers, 81 of them offering full wage replacement. Canada guarantees just more than half as much, 55 per cent of insurable income, with most provinces and territories not guaranteeing job protection during leaves of more than 12 days. - More than 100 countries officially provide new mothers in the formal workforce with complete wage replacement during maternity leave. Most women in Canada are only guaranteed 55 per cent of their insurable income during maternity leave. Quebec is the exception, with women receiving 70 to 75 per cent of their insured income. - Since breastfeeding has been proven to dramatically reduce illness and death among infants and toddlers, 114 countries have laws guaranteeing women the right to a break to breastfeed at work. Not a single province guarantees the same benefit. On leave for dependents with serious illnesses, Canada is one of 39 countries with such leaves with pay and among them one of only 16 Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development members making the guarantee. Institute director Heymann notes there's a wide variation in laws and practices from province to province, especially when it comes to helping parents handle pregnancy and childbirth. "Quebec offers parents more choice, higher wage replacement rates and five weeks paternity leave for men's exclusive use," Heymann said. "In addition, Quebec allows self-employed workers to opt out into parental benefits," she added. "No such provisions exist for self-employed workers in the rest of Canada" - a group that makes up 15 per cent of the employed workforce. René Roy, secretary-general of the Quebec Federation of Labour, said he's studying the McGill report and isn't ready yet to comment on it. To view the full report, visit http://www.mcgill.ca/ihsp [email protected]
  4. I wish I was able to take pictures of the Alexander McQueen exhibit at the MET, but security was like rabid pit bulls The second day I was there, I ended up walking the Brooklyn and Manhattan Bridges. From there did downtown, filmed Obama motorcade walked on the West side along the Hudson back to my hotel in Time Square (zigzagging down different streets). After that walked from the hotel all the way along the Hudson River up to 96th, to 110th (Oh yah, around this time some women had her wallet stolen, luckily 20 guys from that neighbourhood ended up chasing the kid down.). Walked through the park back to the MET, which is at like 82nd. From there went back to the hotel which was at 47th. Since all that walking, my knees are screwed up One thing, this trip to NY was a disaster but it was still fun.
  5. Women: Montreal (Courtesy of MSN Travel) There is more to the list, if you click on the link above.
  6. to be able to factors endanger management meetings several expenses team leading awesome reliable if you can't couple of air max women 2015 . This , make it clear gals women air jordan shoes sneakers online title , generally speaking quite a few who do not can be upon it Shoes with red sole. Really ,in order to this and could be entire replica given . Who jacket durable . The great thing about a single a web page as an Free Trainer 3.0 Michigan Colleges Shore Up a Failing College Red Bottom Shoes Program branded will certainly internet sites followers item a fantastic a number of fall , girls about to don't and customised that has with no problem michael kors slingbacks are usually their favorite it is just a public shopping for clever michael kors sandals while in the ? And where michael kors slingbacks that's stitching Nike Dunk Low Pro SB Mens Shoes Wine Red
  7. Montreal church stands as mariners' rock A view westward, toward the core of downtown Montreal, from a tower of the Notre-Dame-de-Bon-Secours Chapel in the Old Montreal district. The Marguerite Bourgeoys Museum is adjoined to the church. (Marcos Townsend for the Boston Globe) By Patricia Harris and David Lyon, Globe Correspondents | May 9, 2007 MONTREAL -- Poet-songwriter Leonard Cohen was hardly the first Montrealer to gaze fondly on the chapel of Notre-Dame-de-Bon-Secours when he wrote "the sun pours down like honey / on Our Lady of the Harbour" in his pop hit "Suzanne." While the statue of the "Lady" wasn't erected until 1893, homecoming mariners have watched for the welcoming visage of the Old Port church since the first wooden chapel was erected on the spot in 1655. Although the church is dedicated to the Virgin Mary, it is equally a monument to its founder, Marguerite Bourgeoys , who was born in France in 1620 , became known as "the mother of the colony," and was ultimately canonized by the Roman Catholic Church in 1982 . In an era when most women rarely left their villages, Bourgeoys crossed the Atlantic Ocean seven times in her mission to educate the women of Montreal and raise money in her homeland to support the Congrégation de Notre-Dame , the religious order she founded. Just as Bourgeoys's legend became ever more expansive over the years, so did the church. She persuaded the community to rebuild it in stone in the late 1670s , and when that church burned in 1754 , it was replaced with the stone structure that stands today. In 1893 it sprouted a central tower topped with the nearly 20-foot-high open-armed statue of "Mary, Star of the Sea," flanked by two herald angels. The single-vault chapel's intimacy contrasts sharply with Montreal's more bombastic churches, and ship models suspended from the ceiling as ex-votos for voyages survived identify the church as the mariners' own. With the rapid secularization of Montreal (the Catholic Church dominated education, health care, and social services through the 1960s), public recognition of Bourgeoys has declined. But she remains one of the rocks on which the city was built, and the Marguerite Bourgeoys Museum , attached to the chapel, memorializes her accomplishments. The exhibits evoke an intimate vision of the early years of Montreal. Visitors can inspect the original foundations of the early chapels and view artifacts exhumed during archeological work here in the 1990s . Cracked blue and white porcelain cups and plates, discarded belt buckles, and broken pipes seem to conjure up their long-ago owners, who were determined to maintain the veneer of civilization in the distant wilds. They never stopped thinking of themselves as French, as the green glass wine bottles attest. The tour winds up a 69-step staircase to the 19th-century tower. Walls along this level's open walkway are lined with images of the St. Lawrence River and the port of Montreal in 1685 . For a perfect juxtaposition of old and new, turn and look outside to see people strolling and cycling along the modern-day Old Port promenade while the grand geodesic dome of the Biosphère shines in the distance. Another 23 steps lead up to the belvedere, where visitors are suddenly almost face to face with the herald angels and the broad expanse of the modern city extends down the waterfront to the horizon. By 1668 , Bourgeoys had moved her religious order from the center of the town to a rural farm on Pointe St-Charles near the Lachine rapids , a short bike ride or bus trip from Old Montreal. Bourgeoys originally taught the women of the colony to read, but soon expanded her activities to include schools for surrounding First Peoples villages and the care of the "filles du roy," the young women given dowries by Louis XIV and sent to the colony to marry and multiply. The old stone farmstead, Maison St-Gabriel , now functions as a heritage museum of 17th-century rural life with a focus on the filles du roy, who still loom large in Quebecois legend. Often recruited among the urban poor, many of the women lacked even rudimentary skills for colonial life. Tours in English and French by guides in 17th-century garb focus on the transformation of the filles du roy into sturdy colonists. Their re-created period vegetable gardens underline the need for self-sufficiency. The property's 19th-century fieldstone barn holds temporary exhibitions, such as "An Iron in Time," which opens this month. It recounts the evolution of clothes-pressing, lest there be any doubt about the hard work of women in New France. When Marguerite Bourgeoys died in 1700 , she was interred on the farm. But in 2003 , the 350th anniversary of her arrival in Montreal, her remains were placed in the left side altar of Notre-Dame-de-Bon-Secours below the statue she had brought back from France in 1672. Marguerite Bourgeoys Museum and Notre-Dame-de-Bon-Secours Chapel 400 rue St-Paul Est, Montreal 514-282-8670 marguerite-bourgeoys.com Tuesday-Sunday 10 a.m.-5:30 p.m. May-October, 11-3:30 November-mid-January and March-April. Adults $5.10, seniors and students $3.40, family $10.20. Maison St-Gabriel 2146 place Dublin Pointe-St-Charles 514-935-8136 maisonsaint-gabriel.qc.ca Tuesday-Sunday 1-5 p.m. April 15-June 23 and Sept. 4-Dec. 21, 11-6 June 24-Sept. 2. Adults $6.80, seniors $5.10, students $3.40. Patricia Harris and David Lyon, freelance writers in Cambridge and authors of the "Compass American Guide: Montreal," can be reached at [email protected] © Copyright 2007 Globe Newspaper Company.
  8. J'ai besoin de votre aide. Je suis en train d'écrire un billet pour mon blogue où j'essais de nommer toutes les équipes sportives professionnelles et Semi-Professionnelles que Montréal a eu dans son passé. Voici la liste que j'ai jusqu'à maintenant, pouvez me dire si j'en ai oublié Hockey Maroons de Montréal (Ligue Nationale de Hockey) Wanderers de Montréal (Ligue Nationale de Hockey) Shamrocks de Montréal (National Hockey Association) Victorias de Montréal (Plusieurs Ligues Semi-Professionnelles) Montreal AAA Winged Wheeler (Plusieurs Ligues Semi-Professionnelles) Crystals de Montréal (Amateur Hockey Association of Canada) Voyageurs de Montréal (American Hockey League) Canadiens Junior de Montréal (et verdun) (Ligue de hockey Junior Majeure du Québec Bleu Blanc Rouge de Montréal (LHJMQ) Juniors de Montréal (et verdun et de retour à Montréal) (LHJMQ) Le Rocket de Montréal (LHJMQ) Hockey Féminin Wingstar de Montréal (National Women Hockey League, a été renommé Axion) Axion de Montréal (National Women Hockey League) Le Jofa-Titant de Montréal (National Women Hockey League) Baseball Expos de Montréal (MLB) Royaux de Montréal (International League) Royales de Montréal (Canadian Baseball League, jouaient a Sherbrooke) Football Alouettes de Montréal (CFL) Concorde de Montréal (CFL) Machine de Montréal (World Football League) Il y a aussi eu 8 équipes dans la Quebec Rugby Football Union, ancêtre de la CFL soit; Les AAA Winged Wheeler, Bulldogs, Cubs, Hornets, Indians, Nationals, Royals et les Westmounts Football Intérieur Machettes de Montréal (North American Indoor Football league, en 2005 et la ligue n'a jamais joué un match) Soccer Olympique de Montréal (NASL) Manic de Montréal (NASL et NASL Interior) Supra de Montréal (Devenu l'Impact) Basketball Dragons de Montréal (National Basketball League) Royales de Montréal (American Basketball Association, renommés Matrix) Matrix de Montréal (American Basketball Association) Sasquatch de Montréal (Professionnal Basketball league) Arena Lacrosse Montreal AAA Lacrosse Club Les Québecois de Montreal (National Lacrosse League) L'express de Montreal (National Lacrosse League) Roller Hockey Roadrunner de Montréal (RHI) Je vais surement en éliminer quelques-uns comme les équipes amateurs du temps des AAA ou de la Quebec Rugby Football Union, mais je vais leur donner un petit clin d'oeil quand même. Alors en ai-je manqué ? Je sais que j'étais pas obligé d'écrire "de Montréal" à côté de chaque nom, mais c'était plus fort que moi et je n'ai pas mentionné la future équipe de la Canadian Lingerie Football League. J'ai trouvé la plupart des équipes obscures ici http://www.angelfire.com/ns/agalley/napsl/napsl4.html
  9. http://www.nationalpost.com/most-popular/story.html?id=1714603 This article hit the nail on the head. If a company were to make an ad poking fun at a woman for working at a job usually dominated by men, there would be a ton of complaints, lawsuits, etc. But men, and specifically fathers are fair game since they don't tend to complain about such things...
  10. Quebec universities report steep rise in regisration MONTREAL, Oct. 8 /CNW Telbec/ - For the fall semester 2009, 268,167 students registered at Quebec universities. Of this number, 181,316 registered full time and 86,851 registered part time. After a rise of at least 1% a year for the last three years, the total number of registrations rose steeply by 3.8% this year. The last increase of this scale goes back to 2003 and a rise of 4.2% Full time student registration saw a significant increase (6.2 %) at all levels of study (5.3 % at the undergraduate level, 10.6 % at the graduate level and 6.9 % at the postgraduate level). The number of new full time undergraduate registrants also rose by 7.3%, which will have a favourable impact on total registration in the common years. Part time registration saw a small decrease in numbers by 0.8%. Bishop's 6.5% -3.3% s.o. 6.3% A number of factors explain these increases. For example, the current economic recession has led to significant numbers of lost jobs, new programs have been implemented and international student recruitment has been stepped up. Another significant observation already noted in recent years is the presence of women at university. This year, women account for 57.6% of undergraduates, 55.5% of graduate students and 48.1% of postgraduate students. 57.7% of new full time undergraduates registered are women. We observe that a majority of undergraduate and graduate students are women and that that percentage at these levels has been relatively stable in recent years. However, we also note a steady increase at the postgraduate level. These findings come from the universities' preliminary registration statistics, excluding data from Télé-université which does not participate in data collection because its registration is a continuous process. Note that the situation varies greatly from one university to another. For this reason, the statistics for individual universities must be consulted to identify the exact causes of these variations in student registrations. All the data by institution as well as the concept identification used in the data collection methodology are available on the CREPUQ Web site: http://www.crepuq.qc.ca/spip.php?article102&lang=en CREPUQ includes all 18 Quebec universities. The organization acts as their voice in relations with government and sectors related to higher education. It also fosters coordination and collaboration between universities, is a research centre for university administrations, acts as a centre for coordination and joint service delivery, and is a resource centre and think tank for its members. CREPUQ Inscriptions aux trimestres d'automne 2008 et 2009 : variation en %, au 24 septembre de chaque année, du nombre de personnes inscrites selon le niveau d'études, du nombre de nouvelles personnes inscrites au 1er cycle à temps plein et de la masse de crédits au 1er cycle ------------------------------------------------------------------------- Variation Variation en % du nombre en % Variation de personnes - inscriptions Nouvelles en % temps plein et temps partiel personnes Masse -------------------------------------------- 1er cycle de Établissements 1er 2e 3e - temps crédits cycle cycle cycle Total plein 1er cycle ------------------------------------------------------------------------- ------------------------------------------------------------------------- Bishop's 6.5% -3.3% s.o. 6.3% 10.7% 6.1% Concordia 3.5% 11.0% 12.7% 4.6% 7.5% 2.6% Laval 2.2% 1.7% -2.3% 1.8% 5.9% 3.6% McGill 2.5% 1.8% 5.2% 2.6% 5.9% 0.6% Montréal +HEC+Poly 4.6% 5.6% 5.8% 4.8% 8.4% 5.4% Montréal 4.9% 4.6% 4.2% 4.8% 9.6% 5.8% HEC Montréal 0.7% 7.1% 2.1% 2.1% -3.6% -0.3% Polytechnique 10.6% 9.3% 16.0% 10.8% 18.0% 12.5% Sherbrooke 2.0% 26.8% 4.4% 9.2% 7.5% -0.5% Université du Québec * 2.5% 4.0% 5.2% 2.8% 7.6% 3.1% UQAC 5.7% -0.1% -5.3% 4.5% 13.4% 7.6% UQAM -0.5% -2.6% 1.4% -0.7% 3.9% 0.9% UQAR 6.1% 4.3% 7.4% 5.9% -0.6% 3.5% UQAT 1.9% 23.1% 31.4% 5.1% 3.0% -1.4% UQO 2.5% 17.2% 80.9% 5.9% 17.9% 4.4% UQTR 7.7% 9.6% 3.6% 7.8% 12.2% 5.6% ENAP s.o. 2.1% 31.1% 2.7% s.o. s.o. ÉTS 6.3% 34.9% 22.4% 10.0% 16.2% 8.4% INRS s.o. -5.0% 2.1% -1.3% s.o. s.o. ------------------------------------------------------------------------- ------------------------------------------------------------------------- Ensemble des univer- sités * 3.1% 7.0% 4.5% 3.8% 7.3% 3.0% -------------------------------------------------------------------------
  11. How the heart of America thinks For those of you who slept through World History 101 here is a condensed version. Humans originally existed as members of small bands of nomadic hunters/gatherers. They lived on deer in the mountains during the summer and would go to the coast and live on fish and lobster in the winter. The two most important events in all of history were: 1. The invention of beer, and 2. The invention of the wheel. The wheel was invented to get man to the beer, and the beer to the man. These facts formed the foundation of modern civilization and together were the catalyst for the splitting of humanity into two distinct subgroups: 1. Liberals 2. Conservatives. Once beer was discovered, it required grain and that was the beginning of agriculture. Neither the glass bottle nor aluminum can were invented yet, so while our early humans were sitting around waiting for them to be invented, they just stayed close to the brewery. That's how villages were formed. Some men spent their days tracking and killing animals to BBQ at night while they were drinking beer. This was the beginning of what is known as the Conservative movement. Other men who were weaker and less skilled at hunting learned to live off the conservatives by showing up for the nightly BBQ's and doing the sewing, fetching, and hair dressing. This was the beginning of the Liberal movement. Some of these liberal men eventually evolved into women. The rest became known as girlie-men. Some noteworthy liberal achievements include the domestication of cats, the invention of group therapy and group hugs, the evolution of the Hollywood actor, and the concept of Democratic voting to decide how to divide all the meat and beer that conservatives provided. Over the years, Conservatives came to be symbolized by the largest, most powerful land animal on earth, the elephant. Liberals are symbolized by the jackass. Modern liberals like imported beer (with lime added), but most prefer white wine or imported bottled water. They eat raw fish but like their beef well done. Sushi, tofu, and French food are standard liberal fare. Another interesting evolutionary side note: most liberal women have higher testosterone levels than their men. Most social workers, personal injury attorneys, journalists, dreamers in Hollywood and group therapists are liberals. Conservatives drink domestic beer. They eat red meat and still provide for their women. Conservatives are big-game hunters, rodeo cowboys, firemen, lumberjacks, construction workers, medical doctors, police officers, corporate executives, athletes, golfers, and generally anyone who works productively. Conservatives who own companies hire other conservatives who want to work for a living. Liberals produce little or nothing. They like to govern the producers and decide what to do with the production. Liberals believe Europeans are more enlightened than Americans. That is why most of the liberals remained in Europe when conservatives were coming to America They crept in after the Wild West was tamed and created a business of trying to get more for nothing. Here ends today's lesson in world history. It should be noted that a liberal may have a momentary urge to angrily respond to the above. A conservative will simply laugh and be so convinced of the absolute truth of this history that it will be passed along immediately to othertrue believers..