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Found 7 results

  1. Quebec sees growth in English-speaking population Last Updated: Monday, December 21, 2009 | 9:20 PM ET CBC News The number of English-speaking Quebecers is on the increase for the first time in 30 years due to immigration, along with a slowdown in the outflow of Quebec anglophones. The number has grown by about 5.5 per cent between the censuses of 2001 and 2006, reversing a trend that began in the early 1970s when provincial language policies and a push for Quebec sovereignty prompted many English-speaking residents to move elsewhere. The influx includes people moving from other provinces, as well as an increase in immigration by English-speaking people from south Asian countries. CBC News interviewed several families who have made the move. Steve Clarke and his family moved to Quebec City from Oklahoma and are impressed by the city's safety, its old-world architecture and by what he calls a "benign" government. "When people move to New York City, other people in New York City don't ask them 'why did you move here?' They just understand — you'd move here because it's a great place to live," he said. "But people in Quebec, because it's unusual for people who aren't French as a mother language, I guess it's a curiosity," Clarke said. Carrie-Anne Golding and Ryan Hughes, who moved to Montreal from Vancouver, enjoy the low cost of housing and the city's vibrant, 24-hour lifestyle, but admit cultural change requires some adjustments. "I think the first few months was sort of the honeymoon phase of everything is wonderful," Golding said. "And the reality of, you know, as an anglophone, you are in a minority in comparison." "I thought that we would merge in with the cultures a lot quicker," she said. "But it is a little bit harder. There is definitely some inroads to do in merging in with the French culture." The increase in Quebec's English-speaking population comes as a surprise to Jack Jedwab, a demographer and executive-director of the Association for Canadian Studies. Jedwab is also surprised by how little attention has been paid to the trend by Quebec's English media, compared with 30-year spotlight they focused on the so-called Anglo Exodus. "The community psychology is such that it's very accustomed to this erosion," he said. "It has become part of the [anglophone] community's identity. The shock of that demographic decline, it's impact on our institutional life." Jedwab noted that Quebec's civil service is almost entirely francophone, which can exacerbate the feeling of alienation in the English-speaking community. He suggested it may be time for anglophones to try to build on their increase in numbers, instead of clinging to the old complaint that they're a disappearing breed.
  2. Read more: http://www.montrealgazette.com/news/CSIS+boss+cites+worrisome+terrorist+trend/3015056/story.html#ixzz0ngxLANsG Quite alarming news. All I can say is that their (and their family's) citizenship should be withdrawn immediately, and they should be given trials as soon as possible. If they are deemed to be a threat to society, then we send 'em to Gitmo. If they are just radical Muslims (but non-violent), deport them back to wherever it is they came from.
  3. http://www.businessweek.com/articles/2013-03-14/micro-apartments-in-the-big-city-a-trend-builds Always happy to see quotes from professors at my alma mater, especially when it comes to real estate issues! Micro-Apartments in the Big City: A Trend Builds By Venessa Wong March 14, 2013 6:00 PM EDT Imagine waking in a 15-by-15-foot apartment that still manages to have everything you need. The bed collapses into the wall, and a breakfast table extends down from the back of the bed once it’s tucked away. Instead of closets, look overhead to nooks suspended from the ceiling. Company coming? Get out the stools that stack like nesting dolls in an ottoman. Micro-apartments, in some cases smaller than college dorm rooms, are cropping up in North American cities as urban planners experiment with new types of housing to accommodate growing numbers of single professionals, students, and the elderly. Single-person households made up 26.7 percent of the U.S. total in 2010, vs. 17.6 percent in 1970, according to Census Bureau data. In cities, the proportion is often higher: In New York, it’s about 33 percent. And these boîtes aren’t just for singles. The idea is to be more efficient and eventually to offer cheaper rents. To foster innovation, several municipalities are waiving zoning regulations to allow construction of smaller dwellings at select sites. In November, San Francisco reduced minimum requirements for a pilot project to 220 square feet, from 290, for a two-person efficiency unit. In Boston, where most homes are at least 450 sq. ft., the city has approved 300 new units as small as 375 sq. ft. With the blessing of local authorities, a developer in Vancouver in 2011 converted a single-room occupancy hotel into 30 “micro-lofts” under 300 sq. ft. Seattle and Chicago have also green-lighted micro-apartments. “In the foreseeable future, this trend will continue,” says Avi Friedman, a professor and director of the Affordable Homes Research Group at McGill University’s School of Architecture. A growing number of people are opting to live alone or not to have children, he says. Among this group, many choose cities over suburbs to reduce reliance on cars and cut commute times. “Many people recognize that there is a great deal of value to living in the city,” he says. Friedman calls the new fashion for micro-digs the “Europeanization” of North America. In the U.K. the average home is only 915 square feet. In the U.S. the average new single-family home is 2,480 square feet. The National Association of Home Builders expects that to shrink to 2,152 square feet by 2015. Small living has deep roots in Japan, where land is scarce. “It’s just the way things have always been done,” says Azby Brown, an architect and author of The Very Small Home: Japanese Ideas for Living Well in Limited Space. Three hundred square feet may sound tight, but consider that Japanese families historically lived in row houses outfitted with 100-square-foot living quarters and large communal areas. After World War II, Japan’s homes grew, though not much by American standards. By the late 1980s the average Japanese home measured 900 square feet. Tight quarters demand ingenuity and compromise. Think of the Japanese futon or the under-the-counter refrigerator, a feature of European apartments. The Murphy bed gets a sleek makeover in a mock-up of a micro-apartment on exhibit at the Museum of the City of New York. The 325-square-foot space, designed by New York architect Amie Gross, also features a table on wheels that can be tucked under a kitchen counter and a flat-screen TV that slides along a rail attached to built-in shelves. Visual tricks such as high ceilings and varied floor materials make the space feel roomier. The show, titled “Making Room: New Models for Housing New Yorkers,” displays some of the entries from a design competition sponsored by New York’s Department of Housing Preservation and Development. The winning team, comprising Monadnock Development, Actors Fund Housing Development, and nArchitects, secured permission to erect a 10-story building in Manhattan made of prefabricated steel modules. Some of the 55 units will be as small as 250 square feet. “The hope is that with more supply, that should help with the affordability of these kinds of apartments so that the young or the elderly can afford to live closer to the center and not have to commute so far in,” says Mimi Hoang, a co-founder of nArchitects. Although tiny, these properties aren’t cheap, at least not on a per-square-foot basis. In San Francisco, where two projects are under way, rents will range from $1,200 to $1,500 per month. In New York, the 20-odd units for low- and middle-income renters will start at $939. Ted Smith, an architect in San Diego, says singles would be better served by residences that group efficiency studios into suites with communal areas for cooking, dining, and recreation. “The market does not want little motel rooms to live in,” he says. “There needs to be cool, hip buildings that everyone loves and goes, ‘Man, these little units are wonderful,’ not ‘I guess I can put up with this.’ ” BusinessWeek - Home ©2013 Bloomberg L.P. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
  4. another disturbing trend, and if you're annoyed by now - that's fine i'm merely pointed out the news and a trend. When Astral was purchased by Bell Media, essentially the HQ has been gutted, top guys replaced and power being consolidated in Toronto. There's a continued and disturbing trend of Montreal founded companies moving to Toronto (BCE, AC, Molson, the banks....). http://argent.canoe.ca/nouvelles/bell-media-poursuit-sa-restructuration-au-quebec-10092015 Bell Média poursuit sa restructuration au Québec Le 10 septembre 2015 à 15h45 | Argent Bell Média (BCE : TSX) a remercié six cadres supérieurs et a annoncé mercredi la création d’un nouveau poste de dirigeant, celui de vice-président des ventes stratégiques. Ce qui n’a surpris personne dans le milieu des médias : depuis l’achat des stations de radios et télévisions Astral Média en juin 2013 pour 3,4 milliards $, Bell Média restructure ses activités. Cinq dirigeants de Bell Média basés à Toronto ont perdu leur poste, soit Lesley Conway (vice-présidente principale, Bell Média ventes au Canada anglais), Gianni Di Iorio (vice-président, recherche et gestion des revenus), Paul Lewis (président et directeur général de Discovery Channel), Paul Rogers (vice-président principal de CTV News Toronto) et Erin Sinyard (vice-présidente finances, rapports, planification et capital). À ces cadres anglophones remerciés s’ajoute le vice-président contenu, Mario Clément. Ce Québécois orchestrait notamment le contenu des chaînes Canal D, Canal Vie, Super Écran et VRAK. Un autre cadre qui présidait les activités de télévision et de radio dans la province, Charles Benoît, a perdu son poste en août dernier. Ce qui laisse croire que le pouvoir décisionnel de l’entreprise se concentre au siège social de Toronto. Le nouveau vice-président des ventes stratégiques nommé mercredi, Mark Finney, sera d’ailleurs responsable de « toutes les équipes de langues française et anglaise du Marketing des ventes, des Partenariats de marque et du Mix de Bell Média, réunissant pour la première fois ces services en un groupe sous la direction d’un seul leader », indique un communiqué de Bell Média daté de mercredi. Le dirigeant du Réseau des sports (RDS), Gerry Frappier, assume aujourd’hui les responsabilités de Charles Benoît à la tête des médias francophones de Bell Média. D’autres postes abolis ? En 2013, après l’achat d’Astral Média, des spécialistes du secteur des médias anticipaient de nombreuses pertes d’emploi. Un des syndicats de Bell Média, à Toronto, redoutait une centaine de mises à pied. Ce qui ne s’est pas avéré. À l’été 2013, Bell Média a tout de même supprimé une trentaine de postes de cadres dans le sillage de l’acquisition d’Astral Média. Et en mars dernier, sept employés de la radio francophone de Bell Média, dont le directeur de l’information pour le Québec Éric Latour, ont également perdu leur emploi. L’intégration d’Astral Média pourrait-elle entraîner des compressions majeures dans le personnel ? Le porte-parole de Bell Média, Olivier Racette, a refusé de commenter jeudi.
  5. THE CANADIAN PRESS MONTREAL–Cadillac Fairview has announced a $52-million investment to "bring elegance and luxury to the shopping experience" at Carrefour Laval in suburban Montreal. The renovation, starting immediately and set for completion by the autumn of next year, includes relocating the shopping centre's food courts into a new 1,200-seat complex, adding more stores and ``harmonizing the common areas with the garden court." Cadillac Fairview, owned by the Ontario Teachers' Pension Plan, said Wednesday the design is "inspired by the urban trend seen in shopping centres of leading international cities." The upgrading of the 34-year-old mall, now with about 300 retailers in its 1.3 million leasable square feet, will include new flooring, ceilings, lighting and soft seating areas, with construction planned to minimize inconvenience for shoppers. Other properties in Cadillac Fairview's $16-billion portfolio include the Toronto-Dominion Centre and Eaton Centre in Toronto and the Pacific Centre in Vancouver
  6. Urban areas see revival in housing construction http://www.usatoday.com/money/economy/housing/2009-03-10-urban-construction_N.htm?csp=34