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Found 7 results

  1. jesseps

    wisdom teeth

    Today got all four out today. I hate this, almost 8 hours later it is still bleeding. From what I've heard bleeding can occur for a couple of days, honestly that is fucking BS. All I taste right now is my own blood, which I don't mind just sucks I wont be able to eat for a while. Best thing is protein shakes probably will kill me, if I have way to many of them. Also for me this stupid thing will make me lose more weight, even though I am 130 pounds (usually), and it takes forever for me to gain weight back. It took me 3-4 months to gain 10 pounds One thing I am trying to get, we have evolved for millions of years pretty much and yet we still have these damn teeth.
  2. amNY.com Extreme Commuter: From Montreal to Queens By Justin Rocket Silverman, amNewYork Staff Writer [email protected] January 28, 2008 [/url] This Extreme Commuter rides a plane the way most of us ride the subway. Professor Adnan Turkey lives in Montreal but teaches computer science at DeVry Institute of Technology in Long Island City. He's been making that commute once a week for nine years, 45 weeks a year. Although the flight itself is only about 75 minutes long, getting to and from the airport makes it impractical to make the ride daily. Price is a factor, too. Flying directly from Montreal is too expensive even once a week, so for half the ticket price he drives across the border to fly out of Burlington, Vt. So every Monday at noon he leaves his house in Canada and makes that 2-hour trip to Vermont. He puts the car in long-term parking ($6 a day) and flies to New York, where he will sleep in a small rented apartment and teach until Thursday afternoon. Then he takes the flight and drives back home. Door-to-door it's about seven hours each way. "After working many years in Canada, I thought, 'why not come to New York City?'" he asks. "It's just next door and it's the capital of the world." Adnan knows of no other commuters on the Montreal/New York City run, and says many of the border guards laugh in amazement when he states his business in the U.S. Although the weekly $150-round trip JetBlue ticket, and the monthly rent in New York takes a bit out of his income (he won't say how much), Adnan says he has no plans to ask his wife, also a university teacher, and two college-age daughters to move to New York. Besides, money has never been his primary interest. "Education is a noble mission, so salary is not the No. 1 concern, at least for me," he says. "When I see the next generation of students learning and becoming skilled, that's my job satisfaction." Know an Extreme Commuter? Transit reporter Marlene Naanes wants to hear the story. Email her at [email protected] Copyright © 2008, AM New York http://www.amny.com/sports/football/giants/am-commuter0128,0,4574142,print.story
  3. I'm a huge James Bond fan. I happened to stumble upon this: It would be awesome in the 23rd 007 film (coming in 2011), if Bond made an appearance in Montreal (even if it was short). Just imagine James Bond walking along a cobblestone street in Old Montreal on his way to a rendez-vous with a local informant. He hasn't yet set foot in Canada yet in one of the movies. Montreal seems like the perfect location (although Quebec City and Newfoundland are close seconds). When you think about it: The producer of the original Bond films, Harry Saltzman was from Sherbrooke. Joseph Wiseman the first major Bond villain (Dr. No) was from Montreal. It would do wonders for the city's tourism industry and international image!
  4. Welcome to the Technodome Another high roller gambling on Montreal's future is Abraham Reichmann, nephew of the once mighty Reichmann brothers of urban development infamy (the Toronto-based family is still reeling from losses of the early '90s and the multi-billion-dollar failure of their Canary Wharf project in London's docklands). If Reichmann has his way with us, Montreal will soon be host to what he likes to call, "the world's largest, and single-most technologically advanced indoor attraction, ever." The upstart Reichmann has been shopping his Technodome project around from city to city for nearly a decade. This past summer, Technodome looked as if it might go to Toronto. Now, the young Reichmann has turned what Dinu Bumbaru of Heritage Montreal calls his "very harsh and determined publicity campaign" on Montreal. "We believe, within three to four years," Reichmann claims, "Montreal will emerge as a premier tourist and entertainment destination not only in North America but in the world." The Technodome project has already secured a partnership with the SGF in Montreal by which $50 million will be "borrowed" from Quebec taxpayers. Though land deals have once again stalled, Bickerdyke shipping pier (at the west end of the port) has been chosen as the location for Technodome--neatly representing the shift of an economy of production to one of consumption. Features: Simply put, Technodome takes Disney's concept of the Edenic themepark as a self-contained mini-universe, and plunks it into the middle of Montreal. Its proposed 200-million-square-foot dome would shelter several biospheres, making it possible, according to Duthel, for a patron to go white-water rafting and downhill skiing in the same visit (thus resolving our harsh climate problem). In addition to "nature" attractions, it will feature disaster rides, IMAX theatres, a 125,000-capacity sports and music arena and massive indoor themed zones similar to the "Lands" at the Disney parks. http://www.montrealmirror.com/ARCHIVES/2000/022400/cover.html
  5. http://www.domusweb.it/en/news/2014/03/06/jonas_dahlberg_to_design_july_22_memorial_sites.html Director of KORO/Public Art Norway Svein Bjørkås announced few days ago the jury’s evaluation of submissions and final decision in the closed competition July 22 Memorial sites, to create three memorials, one of which cuts a 3.5m slit in the landscape, to remember the victims of Anders Behring Breivik. The jury’s decision was unanimous, voting Swedish artist Jonas Dahlberg as winner of the competition.

 Dahlberg’s concept takes the site at Sørbråten as its point of departure. Here he proposes a wound or a cut within the landscape itself to recreate the physical experience of something being taken away, and to reflect the abrupt and permanent loss of those who died on Utøya. The cut will be a three-and-a-half-metre wide excavation running from the top of the headland at the Sørbråten site to below the waterline and extending to each side. This gap in the landscape will make it impossible to reach the end of the headland. The material excavated from the cut at Sørbråten will be used to build the foundation for the temporary memorial at the Government Quarter in Oslo, and will also subsequently serve as the foundation for the permanent memorial there. Jonas Dahlberg, July 22 Memorial site. Alette Schei Rørvik From the Jury’s evaluation: 
"Jonas Dahlberg’s proposal takes the emptiness and traces of the tragic events of 22 July as its starting point. His suggestion for the Sørbråten site is to make a physical incision into the landscape, which can be seen as a symbolic wound. Part of the headland will be removed and visitors will not be able to touch the names of those killed, as these will be engraved into the wall on the other side of the slice out of nature. The void that is created evokes the sense of sudden loss combined with the long-term missing and remembrance of those who perished.
 Dahlberg has proposed to move the landmass taken out of the rocky landscape at Sørbråten to the permanent and temporary memorial site in the Government Quarter in Oslo. By using this landmass to create a temporary memorial pathway between Grubbegata and the Deichmanske Library, a connection is forged between the memorial sites at Sørbråten and the Government Quarter. The names of those killed will be recorded on a wall that runs alongside the pathway.
 The proposed permanent memorial site in Oslo takes the form of an amphitheatre around Høyblokka. Dahlberg also proposes to use trees taken from Sørbråten in this urban environment to maintain the relationship between the memorial sites in the capital and to the victims of the atrocities at Utøya. 
The Jury considers Dahlberg’s proposal for Sørbråten as artistically highly original and interesting. It is capable of conveying and confronting the trauma and loss that the 22 July events resulted in a daring way. The proposal is radical and brave, and evokes the tragic events in a physical and direct manner." Jonas Dahlberg, July 22 Memorial site. Photo Alette Schei Rørvik
  6. Are the World's Leading Financial Centers Also Its Leaders in the Arts? To what degree are the world's leading financial centers also leading centers for the arts? A new study by Monika Skórska and Robert Kloosterman of the University of Amsterdam takes an empirical look. Many have noted a possible connection between the two. While some believe leadership in arts and finance are twin characteristics of leading global cities, others, mainly economists, argue that leadership in the arts comes only after and as a byproduct of economic leadership. Despite these assertions, the study points out, there has has been little systematic empirical research of the connection between finance and arts across global cities. The study examines this possible connection in a set of large global cities, comparing the rankings to the Global Financial Centres Index and their own new measures of arts based on the frequency and scale of artistic events. The first chart below (from the study) shows the top 36 world cities on the Global Financial Centres Index. London takes first, followed by New York, Hong Kong, Singapore, and Shanghai. The second chart (also from the study) shows the top 36 cities on the authors' own Global Arts Centers Index. There is some overlap, but the lists are far from identical. New York takes first place, Berlin is second, and London drops to third. Tokyo takes fourth, and Paris fifth. The researchers then plotted the two rankings on a single chart (below). The connection between finance and arts seems to hold only at the very top of the urban hierarchy — in the world's largest and most economically powerful cities, such as London, New York, and Tokyo, and to a lesser extent in San Francisco, Seoul, and Frankfurt. The study concludes that: All in all, even though we recognize a certain overlap between the Global Arts Centers and Global Financial Centers, we see it as not sufficient to conclude that the world of finance shapes the world of arts. There is no straightforward relationship between being a Global Financial Center and a Global Arts Center. A 44 percent overlap and a similar geographic pattern suggests that surely there are certain factors pivotal for development of Global Financial Centers that will be important for creating a thriving arts scene, Global Arts Centers, as well. We expect some factors such as urban population or the overall economic performance to be conducive to both a thriving financial sector and a flourishing arts scene. However, we see this as not sufficient to prove that a financial activity would actually drive cities’ arts activity, especially considering that some cities with an excellent performance as a financial center– i.e. Hong Kong, Singapore, and Shanghai – are still not appearing on our radar of Global Arts Centers. And vice versa, some of the most artistically exciting cities – Berlin, Vienna and Los Angeles are apparently driven by factors not directly related to financial services. They are exploiting other sources to thrive as Global Arts Centers. The relationship between finance and arts is complex. While the two are related in the world's largest and most economically powerful cities, a number of patterns come through from this analysis. It is certainly not that artistic success simply follows from the level of development. Affluence does not in effect buy artistic success. There are quite a few cities that are financial centers but lack artistic excellence, while many of the world's leading artistic centers rank much further down on artistic success. European cities in particular seem to have higher levels of artistic excellence above and beyond their global economic and financial prowess. The study is an interesting start, but much more research needs to be done using better indicators and across a larger sample of global cities. http://www.theatlanticcities.com/jobs-and-economy/2012/10/are-worlds-leading-financial-centers-also-its-leaders-arts/3468/
  7. I see these buildings a lot in the US, and a lot less in Canada. I know very little about architecture and I wonder if this is some kind of branch of postmodernism which has not been honoured with a name because most people consider it cheap. But then again, someone takes the time to design the skins of these buildings, right?