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Found 24 results

  1. nephersir7

    Gare Kahnawake

    C'est passé sous le radar, mais depuis quelques temps, Kahnawake est en train de sonder l'intérêt pour la mise en service d'une nouvelle gare de la ligne Candiac sur son territoire. http://www.kahnawake.com/pr_text.asp?ID=2904 http://www.kahnawake.com/pr_text.asp?ID=2932 On sait que l'AMT avait déjà investi 100k$ pour une étude de concept entre 2010 et 2012 On peut donc imaginer que le projet pourrait se concrétiser quand le MTQ décidera finalement de s'occuper de son pont qui tombe en ruines.
  2. Don’t tell anyone, but it’s a myth that millennials hate the suburbs It might not be as cool as living downtown, but a new survey suggests millennials might not hate suburbia all that much. Altus Group, citing its 2015 fall FIRM survey, says 35 per cent of those 35 and under disagree with the statement that they prefer to live in a smaller home in a central area than a larger home in the suburbs. The same survey found 40 per cent do agree with the statement, with everybody else neither agreeing or disagreeing. “We’ve said it before and we’ll say it again — it’s a myth that all so-called millennials are homogeneous in their desires, attitudes and behaviour,” says the report from Toronto-based Altus Group. “While there may be some tendencies that are more pronounced among today’s younger generation, when it comes to the housing sector, segmentation analysis is critical.” The survey, which only considered respondents in centres with populations of more than one million or more, found in almost every age group there was a willingness to trade off the bigger house in the suburbs for a smaller home in a central area. Among those 35-49, like millennials, 40 per cent said they would make the trade-off. <iframe name="fsk_frame_splitbox" id="fsk_frame_splitbox" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="" webkitallowfullscreen="" mozallowfullscreen="" style="padding: 0px; margin: 0px; width: 620px; height: 0px; border-style: none; border-width: initial;"></iframe> Broken into sub categories, 19 per cent of millennials agree completely they are willing to live in that smaller home in a central area versus the larger one in the suburbs. Another 21 per cent somewhat agree. Millennials actually ranked behind those 70 years or older when it comes to strong feelings on the matter. Among those seniors, 22 per cent agreed completely with going for the tinier downtown home. “There is a prevailing view that all millennials in larger markets want to live downtown — even if it means having to settle for a smaller residence to make the affordability equation work. Our research busts that myth,” said Altus Group. The same report finds all those downtown dwellers, many of whom will be settling in high-rise condominiums, are going to need parking sports because they are not ready to ditch their cars. The FIRM survey found that in the country’s six largest markets, defined as Vancouver, Calgary, Edmonton, Toronto, Ottawa-Gatineau and Montreal, only about one in 10 owner occupants of condominiums built in the last six years does not have a vehicle. That’s close to the average of all households, but condo dwellers are far less likely to have two vehicles. twitter.com/dustywallet [email protected] http://business.financialpost.com/personal-finance/mortgages-real-estate/dont-tell-anyone-but-its-a-myth-that-millennials-hate-the-suburbs Contrepoids à la discussion: http://mtlurb.com/forums/showthread.php/23922-Bye-bye-banlieue%21
  3. Quebec climbs to 6th spot in Fraser Institute's mining survey Peter Hadekel PETER HADEKEL, SPECIAL TO MONTREAL GAZETTE More from Peter Hadekel, Special to Montreal Gazette Published on: February 24, 2015Last Updated: February 24, 2015 6:31 AM EST A newly constructed bridge spans the Eastmain river in northern Quebec on Thursday October 03, 2013. The bridge leads to Stornaway Diamond's Renard mine and Camp Lagopede. They are located about 800 kms north of Montreal, on the shore of lake Kaakus Kaanipaahaapisk. Pierre Obendrauf / The Gazette SHARE ADJUST COMMENT PRINT After tumbling in the rankings in recent years, Quebec has re-established itself as one of the world’s most attractive mining jurisdictions, according to the Fraser Institute’s annual survey of the mining industry made public Tuesday. The province jumped to sixth spot in the 2014 rankings for investment attractiveness after finishing 18th the year before. The survey rated 122 jurisdictions around the world “based on their geological attractiveness and the extent to which government policies encourage exploration and investment.” Quebec sat on top of the international rankings from 2007 to 2010 but then dropped as industry perceptions of the province turned negative. Increased red tape, royalty hikes and uncertainty surrounding new environmental regulations all took their toll. But a change of government in Quebec seems to have helped turn those perceptions around. “The confidence mining executives now have in Quebec is due in part to the province’s proactive approach to mining policy and its Plan Nord strategy to encourage investment and mineral exploration in northern Quebec,” said Kenneth Green, the Fraser Institute’s senior director of energy and natural resources. The Liberal government under Philippe Couillard breathed new life into the Plan Nord after taking over from the previous Parti Québécois administration, which had been noticeably cool to the plan first proposed by former Liberal premier Jean Charest. While uncertainty surrounding mineral prices has held back new investment in Quebec, the Liberals have pledged to push the Plan Nord strategy by improving transportation infrastructure and making direct investments where needed. Reflecting the improved mood, an index measuring policy perception places Quebec 12th in the world, up from 21st in 2013. However, Quebec got a black eye in the mining community over its handling of the Strateco Resources Inc. uranium mine, which has been repeatedly delayed. A moratorium was imposed on all uranium exploration permits, which the industry saw as an arbitrary and unnecessary action that devastated junior explorers. As well, the Fraser Institute’s Green noted that in Ontario and British Columbia uncertainty surrounding First Nations consultations and disputed land claims should serve as “a stark lesson for Quebec. Above all, mining investment is attracted when a jurisdiction can provide a clear and transparent regulatory environment.” Finland finished first overall in this year’s survey of 485 mining executives from around the world. Exploration budgets reported by companies participating in the survey totalled US$2.7 billion, down from US$3.2 billion in 2013. Despite its strong performance, Quebec was edged out by two other Canadian provinces: Saskatchewan finished second and Manitoba fourth. A strong Canadian showing included eighth spot for Newfoundland and Labrador and ninth for Yukon. The mining industry has been hampered by a lack of financing for exploration as well as continued uncertainty over future demand and prices. The report found an overall deterioration in the investment climate around the world. There is “a stark difference between geographical regions; notably the divide between Canada, the United States and Australia and the rest of the world.” [email protected] sent via Tapatalk
  4. Montreal ranks well in this survey, but still behind Toronto: http://www.cbc.ca/news/pdf/american-cities-of-the-future.pdf
  5. Changing the plans America’s oil capital is throwing up a few environmental surprises Jul 14th 2012 | HOUSTON | from the print edition STEVE KLINEBERG, a sociologist at Rice University, mentions a couple of events that made Houston’s leaders take notice of a looming problem. One was the day, in 1999, when their city overtook Los Angeles as America’s most polluted—evidence that the rise in asthma attacks among the city’s children, and the students passing out on football pitches, were no coincidence. Another was when Houston came up short in its bid to compete to host the 2012 Olympics. No one on the United States Olympics Committee voted for it, despite the fact that Houston had a brand-new stadium and had promised to turn an old sports field into the world’s largest air-conditioned track-and-field arena. At a casual glance, Houston looks much as it ever did: a tangle of freeways running through a hodgepodge of skyscrapers, strip malls and mixed districts. A closer inspection, though, shows signs of change. The transport authority, which branched into light rail in 2004, is now planning three new lines, adding more than 20 miles of track. Most of the traffic lights now boast LED bulbs, rather than the incandescent sort. More than half the cars in the official city fleet are hybrid or electric, and in May a bike-sharing programme began. Every Wednesday a farmers’ market takes place by the steps of city hall. Other changes are harder to see. The energy codes for buildings have been overhauled and the city is, astonishingly, America’s biggest municipal buyer of renewable energy; about a third of its power comes from Texan wind farms. Houston, in other words, is going green. Laura Spanjian, the city’s director of sustainability, says that businesses are increasingly likely to get on board if they can see the long-term savings or the competitive advantages that flow from creating a more attractive city. She adds an important clarification: “We’re not mandating that they have to do this.” That would not go down well. Houston is the capital of America’s energy industry, and its leaders have traditionally been wary of environmental regulation, both at home and abroad. In fact the city has been sceptical of regulations in general, and even more of central planning. Houston famously has no zoning, which helps explain why the city covers some 600 square miles. It is America’s fourth-largest city by population, but less than half as densely populated as sprawling Los Angeles. People are heavily dependent on cars, the air quality is poor and access to green space is haphazard. At the same time, Houston has jobs, a low cost of living and cheap property. Many people have accepted that trade-off. Between 2000 and 2010 the greater metropolitan area added more than 1.2m people, making it America’s fastest-growing city. Still, the public is taking more interest in sustainability, and for a number of reasons. As the city’s population has swelled, the suburbs have become more crowded. Some of the growth has come from the domestic migration of young professionals with a taste for city life. And despite living in an oil-industry hub, the people of Houston are still aware of the cost of energy; during the summer of 2008, when petrol prices hovered around $4 a gallon, the papers reported a surge of people riding their bicycles to bus stops so that they could take public transport to work. The annual Houston Area Survey from Rice’s Kinder Institute also shows a change. This year’s survey found that 56% think a much better public transport system is “very important” for the city’s future. A similarly solid majority said the Metro system should use all its revenue for improvements to public transport, rather than diverting funds to mend potholes. In the 1990s, most respondents were more concerned about the roads. People’s views about houses have changed, too. In 2008 59% said they would prefer a big house with a big garden, even if that meant they had to use their car to go everywhere. Just 36% preferred a smaller house within walking distance of shops and workplaces. By 2012, preferences were running the other way: 51% liked the idea of a smaller house in a more interesting district, and only 47% said they wanted the lavish McMansion. http://www.economist.com/node/21558632
  6. I'm creating this thread mainly to comment on the long-form census controversy from a non-political point of view. As a mathematician who probably cares and knows less about Canadian politics than anyone else in this forum, this is my opinion: A voluntary survey is completely USELESS, and even more so after it became the subject of a nationwide political debate. An anti-conservative friend of mine wrote last week on facebook that he returned the short form and demanded a long form be sent to him. He thought he was making some kind of statement, but he is actually helping to make the survey even more useless. I don't really blame him, since there is no way to make the long-form data meaningful anymore. It's better if we just forget about it, but I still have a question: how does this happen in a country full of smart people like Canada? I find it a bit scary actually. I would love to know your opinions on the subject.
  7. Canada’s best and worst run cities The RankingsThis survey, the first of its kind in Canada, provides citizens in 31 cities across the country with comparative data on how well—or poorly—their city is run, measured by the cost and quality of the public services it delivers. (Why 31? We took the 30 largest cities in Canada, added whatever provincial capitals were not on the list, then subtracted a few cities from the Greater Toronto Area for better regional balance. Somehow that left 31.) Though the overall results—Burnaby, Saskatoon and Surrey, B.C. lead the pack; Charlottetown, Kingston, Ont., and Fredericton trail—will be of particular interest, they are less important than the process this is intended to kick off. We aim not merely to start some good barroom arguments, but to help voters to hold their representatives to better account, and indeed to help city governments themselves. For without some sort of yardstick to measure their performance, either against other cities or against their own past record, how can they hope to know whether they are succeeding? To compile the survey, Maclean’s commissioned the Halifax-based Atlantic Institute for Market Studies, expanding on the institute’s earlier work measuring the performance of municipalities in Nova Scotia and New Brunswick. Unlike other studies, this does not try to measure quality of life, or which city is the “best place to live.” Rather, it focuses on the contribution of local governments to this end. This survey looks at a city’s efficiency—the cost of producing results—and the effectiveness of its services, including how well each city does when it comes to things like maintaining roads and parks, picking up garbage and putting out fires. Click below to see how the numbers break down. __________________________________________________________________________________ Montréal en queue de peloton Mise à jour le mercredi 22 juillet 2009 à 10 h 18 La ville de Montréal se retrouve au bas du classement au chapitre des villes les mieux gérées du Canada. Au Québec, elle fait aussi piètre figure, derrière Longueuil, Sherbrooke, Québec et Gatineau. Ce sont les conclusions d'une étude effectuée par l'Atlantic Institute for Market Studies (AIMS), et dont les résultats ont été publiés dans le magazine Maclean's, mardi. La recherche s'est attardée au rendement des villes quant à leur production de résultats et à l'efficacité de leurs services, tels que l'entretien des routes et des parcs, et la collecte des ordures. Sur les 29 villes canadiennes étudiées, la métropole québécoise s'est donc placée au 21e rang. Les analystes concèdent que Montréal a un niveau de services supérieur, mais ont montré du doigt le coût de ses services, sa dette et ses taxes. Au chapitre de la gouvernance, les résultats de l'étude ne sont pas plus satisfaisants pour Montréal. Elle occupe le peloton de queue avec une 27e position. « Décentralisation exagérée » - Benoît Labonté En entrevue avec le Journal de Montréal, le chef de l'opposition de Montréal, Benoît Labonté, estime que ces résultats sont « catastrophiques » pour une ville comme Montréal. « C'est dû à une décentralisation exagérée depuis 2003. Quand on a 19 arrondissements avec 19 directeurs généraux, 19 administrations, 19 petits domaines, ça finit par coûter cher », a-t-il ajouté. Le président du comité exécutif de Montréal, Sammy Forcillo, s'est porté à la défense de l'administration municipale. Selon lui, la métropole a été défavorisée en raison du mauvais état dans lequel se retrouvaient les infrastructures souterraines notamment. « Il y a eu un sous-investissement pendant des années et, actuellement, on est en train de faire du rattrapage. On met les bouchées doubles et ça coûte cher », a-t-il souligné au quotidien montréalais. L'autre côté du pont Jacques-Cartier L'administration municipale de Longueuil a pour sa part de bonnes raisons de se réjouir. La même étude place cette ville de la Rive-Sud au 5e rang canadien et bonne première au Québec. Ce sont notamment son taux de taxation, le plus bas des 29 villes étudiées, et son faible niveau de dépenses qui ont permis à Longueuil de se démarquer. De tailles similaires à Montréal, Vancouver (4e), Toronto (10e) et Calgary (11e) ont déclassé la métropole québécoise. Sherbrooke (6e), Québec (9e) et Gatineau (12e) ont aussi fait bonne figure. Comme la ville de Victoria, Laval n'a pas été évaluée, puisqu'elle n'a pas fourni suffisamment de données. En publiant ce classement, le magazine Maclean's souhaite « enclencher un processus » pour améliorer les services dans les villes canadiennes.
  8. Corruption, petty language fights don’t help Montreal’s “reputation deficit” Charles Lapointe says squabbles over a few English words on menus or in bathrooms are “ridiculous” and are “creating a troubling image of Montreal abroad.” Photograph by: Tourisme Montreal , . Charles Lapointe, president of Tourism Montreal, was uncharacteristically frank this week when he said that petty battles over language are undermining the city’s image. Perhaps it’s because he’s retiring in June that Lapointe was willing to speak out. Squabbles over a few English words on menus or in bathrooms are “ridiculous” and are “creating a troubling image of Montreal abroad,” he said. Lapointe’s remarks are timely because we’ve just been reminded that reputation is vital to a city’s financial health. The Global Financial Centres Index, a measure of how cities rank around the world as places to conduct banking, insurance, investment management and other financial transactions, has just been updated. Montreal ranked 16th in the survey, gaining one spot and finishing behind Toronto and Vancouver, but ranking just ahead of Calgary. It seems Montreal suffers from “a reputation deficit,” according to the survey’s author, Mark Yeandle of London-based Z/Yen Group, who was in town to release the latest findings. He wasn’t referring to language battles, student strikes, crumbling roads or rampant municipal corruption. Rather, he meant that the city’s financial strengths in such areas as investment management and derivatives trading are not well known and need to be promoted. Still, it’s clear that image is everything when it comes to a survey like this and it may not be long before Montreal’s troubles catch up to it. The index doesn’t attempt to measure the dollar value of financial business conducted in each city. Instead, it asks nearly 2,400 financial-services professionals to rate cities on 96 criteria. These are grouped into five main areas: the business environment, infrastructure, market access, availability of talent and cost competitiveness. No surprise that London, New York and Hong Kong hold the top three spots or that Singapore, Zurich and Tokyo follow just behind. North American cities ranking ahead of Montreal are Boston (8), Chicago (11), Toronto (12), San Francisco (13), Washington D.C. (14) and Vancouver (15). Montreal can take some encouragement from the index: it ranks ahead of such cities as Paris and Shanghai. But there are warning signs, too. Those responding to the survey placed a lot of value on such issues as the rule of law and absence of corruption. If Montreal can’t clean up its act in this regard, it may well lose business. The more we learn about the complicity between corrupt municipal officials and big local companies hungry for contracts, the less inviting this city looks as a place to do business. Reputation, the study concludes, is “very important” and “predictability is key.” Montreal, of course, isn’t the only place where there’s concern about such issues. Even top-ranked London has looked bad lately. One banker based in London commented: “London continues to receive bad news — LIBOR (the interest-rate fixing scandal), capping of bonuses, corruption — when will it end and what does it take for London to lose its top spot?” Another area of concern in the survey is taxation. “Simplicity and stability are required,” notes the study. You could take that as a reminder to the Parti Québécois government that its income-tax increases on high-income Quebecers risk making Montreal a less attractive destination for mobile financial jobs. What you have to remember is that the financial industry is a moving target; it’s evolving all the time as new centres, products and technologies emerge. When asked which centres are likely to become more significant down the road, respondents identified Singapore, Shanghai, Hong Kong, Seoul and Toronto as their top five picks for future growth. Clearly, Asia is on the move and Latin American cities are rising, too. It’s an ultracompetitive world and Montreal risks being left behind if it can’t develop its strengths. That’s where we get back to language. English does happen to be the language of international banking and finance; let’s hope that petty bureaucrats and politicians don’t get in the way of anyone wanting to expand here. The city’s French fact is already a great attraction, making Montreal a bridge between North America and Europe. Let’s not forget the importance of the other language in any growth strategy. [email protected] Read more: http://www.montrealgazette.com/Corruption+petty+language+fights+help+Montreal+reputation+deficit/8170678/story.html#ixzz2P5HnPZlL
  9. Urban exodus hasn't touched house prices in Montreal Island: study Mike King, Montreal Gazette Published: Tuesday, June 03 Urban sprawl doesn't appear to have had a negative effect on Montreal Island house prices. While 2007 marked the fifth year in a row that Montreal and its on-island suburbs suffered a net loss of approximately 20,000 residents, according to the Institut de la statistique du Québec, Royal LePage Real Estate Services Ltd. notes house prices have soared over the past decade. For example, results of Royal LePage's national Urban vs. Suburban Survey released yesterday show the average price of a bungalow in the city appreciated by 130 per cent to $253,125 during the past 10 years while its suburban off-island counterpart rose by 99 per cent to $226,273. At the same time, the price of a standard two-storey urban home climbed 120.5 per cent to $307,400 compared to a 107-per-cent jump to $265,625 in the 'burbs. The survey examined five urban (Notre Dame de Grâce, Beaconsfield, Dollard des Ormeaux, Dorval and Pointe Claire) and four suburban (St. Lambert, Boucherville, St. Bruno and Laval des Rapides) markets. Gino Romanese, Royal LePage senior vice-president in Toronto, explained in a phone interview there has been "greater demand than supply the last 10 years despite that exodus (of Montrealers)." "The combination of a shortage of inventory and virtually no space in the city for new development led to the significant gains that Montreal experienced over the past decade," he added. "Also contributing to the city's rising house prices is the fact that historically, Montreal's prices were well below the Canadian average." Romanese said "as the country experienced a rapid expansion cycle in the early 2000s, Montreal followed suit with house prices near, or more than, doubling." He pointed out urban enclaves such as N.D.G. hold the most appeal to homeowners because of their proximity to businesses, trendy shopping areas, restaurants and public transit. "The preference for urban dwelling has helped fuel healthy price increases in recent years, with the sharpest rate of appreciation taking place in the past five years." The survey found that shortages of inventory in popular urban residential markets caused many purchasers to look to the urban periphery and then to the suburbs to satisfy their housing needs. "Looking ahead 10 years, it is likely that both Montreal's urban neighbourhoods, as well as their surrounding suburbs, will both see solid price appreciations," Romanese said. "With the city's transit system anticipated to eventually extend out to the St. Lambert area, it's likely more people will consider moving away from the city." But stressing that Montreal remains "a vibrant city with some of the finest restaurants and cultural activities in the country, there are buyers who will always clamour for a home in the heart of the city." He suggested the local situation anwers the age-old question of whether it's best to live in the city or the suburbs. "It depends on what you're looking for, it's a lifestyle choice and by and large, whether you invest in an urban or a suburban area, you should do equally well if history (of the past decade) repeats itself." [email protected] © The Gazette 2008
  10. Montreal is 39th (GDP: USD$120B GDP). Expected to be 47th in 2050 (GDP: USD$180B) 2005: http://www.citymayors.com/statistics/richest-cities-2005.html 2020: http://www.citymayors.com/statistics/richest-cities-2020.html The world's richest cities by personal net earnings in 2008 (per capita) This survey performed by UBS puts New York at "100 level" and compares cities as having net earnings as how much higher or how much lower. Montreal fared reasonably well in the world at 21st position (Toronto 19th). http://www.citymayors.com/economics/richest_cities.html The world's richest cities by purchasing power in 2008 (per capita) This survey performed by UBS puts New York at "100 level" and compares cities as having purchasing power as how much higher or how much lower. Montreal fared really, and ranked 18th position in the world (Toronto 15th). http://www.citymayors.com/economics/usb-purchasing-power.html
  11. Prices 1. Oslo 2. Copenhagen 3. London 4. Dublin 5. Zurich 18. New York 19. Toronto 22. Montreal Survey
  12. Manufacturing activity at 26-year low NEW YORK (CNNMoney.com) -- A key index of the nation's manufacturing activity fell to a 26-year low, sliding into recession territory, a purchasing managers group said Monday. The Institute for Supply Management's (ISM) manufacturing index tumbled to 38.9 in October from 43.5 in September. It was the lowest reading since September 1982, when the index registered 38.8. Economists were expecting a reading of 42, according to a survey conducted by Briefing.com. The tipping point for the index is 50, with a reading below that indicating contraction in manufacturing activity. The index has hovered around the 50 mark since September 2007, with an average of 49.1. A reading below 41 is considered a sign that the economy is in recession. "It appears that manufacturing is experiencing significant demand destruction as a result of recent events, with members indicating challenges associated with the financial crisis, interruptions from the Gulf hurricane, and the lagging impact from higher oil prices," said Norbert Ore, chairman of the Institute for Supply Management's Manufacturing Business Survey Committee, in a statement. Employment in the manufacturing sector fell for the third month in a row. ISM's employment measure registered 34.6 in October, down 7.2 points from September. It was the lowest reading for the employment component since March 1991, when it registered 33.6. The index component for the prices manufacturers pay for raw materials declined 16.5 points to a reading of 37 in the month. It was the lowest point for the component since December 2001 when the prices index registered 33.2. In a sign of growing economic weakness worldwide, the index's measure of export orders fell 11 points to a reading of 41. The decline came after 70 months of expansion. Rising exports had been a bright spot for U.S. manufacturers as the domestic economy deteriorates. But last month's decline suggests that struggling consumers overseas are losing their appetite for U.S. exports.
  13. http://news.nationalpost.com/2011/06/02/north-korea-one-of-the-happiest-places-in-the-world-according-to-north-korea/ http://hken.ibtimes.com/articles/153551/20110528/north-korea-happiness-index-rank-china-top-us-bottom-photos.htm
  14. (Courtesy of the Financial Post) Speaking of mining in Quebec, I took a massive hit from CLQ Luckily I sold off like half my shares at a profit days before it lost 50% Seeing I do not want to make another topic, here is a graph of the top 10 largest mergers in Canada from 2010, I wonder what 2011 has in store for Canada.
  15. http://www2.macleans.ca/2010/09/06/whos-the-smartest/ Comment? Le gouvernement Harper ferait-il ce genre de coupes? Nooooooooooooonnnnn............
  16. MONTREAL - Corruption and politics are shaking investor confidence in Montreal, says a 2014 outlook which ranks Quebec’s key metropolis dead last among nine Canadian cities for commercial real estate growth potential. “Whether it is related to construction, corruption, or politics, interviewees (surveyed) expressed uncertainty about investment in Montreal,” said the outlook compiled by PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP, a professional services giant. The annual survey — which forecasts market trends and outlooks for different property types — also ranks commercial real estate markets in nine Canadian cities based on investment, rental and commercial property development and residential homebuilding potential.. The outlook is based on the views of 1,000 North American real estate industry experts surveyed or interviewed by PWC and survey partner, Urban Land Institute. While the outlook does not refer specifically to the Parti Québécois, elected with a minority government in 2012, one interviewee referred to an anticipated spring 2014 election when saying: “Montreal faces major risks because of uncertainty relating to politics.” In 2013, Montreal was ranked seventh out of nine markets in the survey and there were no remarks over politics or corruption. In the 2014 ranking, Montreal came in ninth, behind Halifax. PWC executives said they couldn’t elaborate on the political, or corruption fears raised by investors. “Sitting in Ontario, this (corruption) is getting a lot of (airtime),” said Frank Magliocco, a partner in the PWC’s audit and assurance group. “That may have had some impact on individuals who were ranking Montreal.” Deborah Dumoulin, a PWC partner, said she did not hear those same concerns voiced in Quebec: “This is not what would be coming from the Montreal market.” While economic growth is expected to rebound in Montreal to 2.1 per cent next year, a saturated office and condo market — combined with a forecast of weak employment growth — mean the city’s development prospects are limited compared to Canada’s booming west. The outlook on investment, a driver of tax revenues, comes at a time when Quebec Finance Minister Nicolas Marceau has already warned he might not be able to balance next year’s budget. Mélanie Malenfant, a spokesperson for Marceau, said she could not comment on the outlook since she was just made aware of it by a reporter. She pointed to PQ efforts to combat collusion, such as Transport Minister Sylvain Gaudreault’s recent unveiling of a 16-point strategy to lower the cost of public contracts. Bernie Marcotte, senior managing director of Cushman & Wakefield in Montreal, said there has been a slowdown in commercial real estate investments, but that’s mostly due to a weaker economy. “We see deals taking longer to complete. We have seen investment by private individuals slow down,” Marcotte said. “But the institutional investor, who’s there for the long haul, is still there.” Two real estate veterans, however, told The Gazette that they are seeing large investors reducing their exposure to Quebec, while Montreal-based developers expand into other provinces. One said investors have been shaken by the Parti Québécois’s focus on reasonable accommodation, including its so-called Charter of Quebec Values: “The government is distracted by social issues, they’re not focusing on the economy.
  17. Aperçu ce matin à Laval. Plaqué Ohio. Ça dit "road survey" et ça traine plein d'équipements particuliers en arrière comme en avant. Quelqu'un à une hypothèse sur ce que ça pourrait être? Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  18. More Quebecers see immigrants as threat: poll By Marian Scott, The GazetteMay 22, 2009 6:59 Protesters demonstrate outside Palais des congrès during the Bouchard-Taylor hearings on reasonable accommodation in November 2007. Protesters demonstrate outside Palais des congrès during the Bouchard-Taylor hearings on reasonable accommodation in November 2007. Photograph by: John Kenney, Gazette file photo One year after a provincial report on the accommodation of cultural minorities, a majority of Quebecers still say newcomers should give up their cultural traditions and become more like everybody else, according to a new poll. Quebecers’ attitudes toward immigrants have hardened slightly since 2007, when the Bouchard-Taylor commission started hearings across Quebec on the “reasonable accommodation” of cultural communities. The survey by Léger Marketing for the Association for Canadian Studies found that 40 per cent of francophones view non-Christian immigrants as a threat to Quebec society, compared with 32 per cent in 2007. Thirty-two per cent of non-francophones said non-Christian immigrants threaten Quebec society, compared with 34 per cent in 2007. “If you look at opinions at the start of the Bouchard-Taylor commission and 18 months later, basically, they haven’t changed,” said Jack Jedwab, executive director of the non-profit research institute. “If the hearings were designed to change attitudes, that has not occurred,” he added. Headed by sociologist Gérard Bouchard and philosopher Charles Taylor, the $3.7-million commission held hearings across Quebec on how far society should go to accommodate religious and cultural minorities. It received 900 briefs and heard from 3,423 participants in 22 regional forums. Its report, made public one year ago Friday, made 37 recommendations, including abolishing prayers at municipal council meetings; increasing funding for community organizations that work with immigrants and initiatives to promote tolerance; providing language interpreters in health care; encouraging employers to allow time off for religious holidays; studying how to hire more minorities in the public service; and attracting immigrants to remote regions. Rachad Antonius, a professor of sociology at the Université du Québec à Montréal, said it’s no surprise the commission failed to change Quebecers’ attitudes toward minorities. “Focusing on cultural differences is the wrong approach,” Antonius said. Cultural communities need to achieve economic equality by having access to education, social services and job opportunities, he said. “If there is greater economic integration, that is what is going to change things,” he said. The poll reveals persistent differences between younger and older Quebecers and between francophones and non-francophones on cultural and religious diversity. For example, 56 per cent of respondents age 18 to 24 said Muslim girls should be allowed to wear hijabs in public schools, while only 30 per cent of those 55 and over approved of head scarves in school. Sixty-three per cent of non-francophones said head scarves should be permitted in school compared with 32 per cent of French-speaking respondents. Only 25 per cent of francophones said Quebec society should try harder to accept minority groups’ customs and traditions while 74 per cent of non-francophones said it should make more of an effort to do so. The poll also found Quebecers split on an ethics and religion course introduced last year in schools across the province. A coalition of parents and Loyola High School, a private Catholic institution, are challenging the nondenominational course, which they say infringes parents’ rights to instill religious values in their children. Half of francophones said the course was a good thing while 78 per cent of non-francophones gave it a thumbs up. When asked their opinion of different religious groups, 88 per cent of French-speakers viewed Catholics favourably, 60 per cent viewed Jews favourably – down 12 percentage points from 2007 – and 40 per cent had a favourable opinion of Muslims (compared with 57 per cent in 2007). Among non-francophones, 92 per cent viewed Catholics with favour, 77 per cent had a positive opinion of Jews and 65 a good opinion of Muslims. A national poll published this month by Maclean’s Magazine also revealed that many Canadians are biased against religious minorities, particularly in Quebec. The survey by Angus Reid Strategies reported that 68 per cent of Quebecers view Islam negatively while 52 per cent of Canadians as a whole have a low opinion of the religion. It found that 36 per cent of Quebecers view Judaism unfavourably, compared with 59 per cent of Ontarians. The Léger Marketing survey of 1,003 Quebecers was conducted by online questionnaire May 13-16. Results are considered accurate within 3.9 percentage points, 19 times out of 20. [email protected] © Copyright © The Montreal Gazette
  19. Read more: http://www.montrealgazette.com/business/Montreal+severely+unaffordable/4167729/story.html#ixzz1CBr3AL86