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Found 25 results

  1. http://montrealgazette.com/news/local-news/little-trace-remains-of-montreals-glamorous-theatre-era Little trace remains of Montreal's glamorous theatre era LINDA GYULAI, MONTREAL GAZETTE More from Linda Gyulai, Montreal Gazette Published on: February 27, 2015 Last Updated: May 13, 2015 9:27 AM EDT Undated photo of theatres lining downtown Ste-Catherine St. in Montreal. Undated photo of theatres lining downtown Ste-Catherine St. in Montreal. There are imaginary ghosts dancing behind the plywood that’s temporarily concealing a vacant storefront on Ste-Catherine St. W. as it undergoes renovation. They’re the spirits of vaudeville and Hollywood, of stars of first silent and then talking movies, of singers, dancers and “manufacturers of mirth,” as one newspaper reviewer described a pair of vaudeville entertainers, and of generations of Montrealers who flocked to live shows and movie premieres while the location was known as Loew’s Theatre. You wouldn’t know it today, but the skinny, towering storefront a few metres west of Mansfield St., which most recently housed a Foot Locker shoe store, was once the entrance of a majestic theatre that served as Montreal’s principal vaudeville house and one of its main movie theatres for many years after it was built in 1917. Then: A print from about 1910 of His Majesty's Theatre, which was located on Guy St., just north of Ste-Catherine. Guy St., just north of Ste-Catherine St. Then: A print from about 1910 of His Majesty's Theatre, which was located on Guy St., just north of Ste-Catherine. Guy St., just north of Ste-Catherine St. Now: His Majesty's Theatre was demolished in 1963, where today stands Concordia University's engineering, computer science and visual arts complex. Now: His Majesty's Theatre was demolished in 1963, where today stands Concordia University's engineering, computer science and visual arts complex. Dave Sidaway / Montreal Gazette Then: The York Theatre opened in 1938 on the northwest corner of Ste-Catherine and Mackay Sts. Then: The York Theatre opened in 1938 on the northwest corner of Ste-Catherine and Mackay Sts. Now: The York Theatre was demolished in 2001 to make way for Concordia University's engineering, computer science and visual arts building. Now: The York Theatre was demolished in 2001 to make way for Concordia University's engineering, computer science and visual arts building. Dave Sidaway / Montreal Gazette Then: A 1972 photo of the Loews Theatre, on Ste-Catherine just west of Mansfield St. Built in 1917 by architect Thomas W. Lamb. With more than 3,000 seats, it was the largest in Montreal when it opened, and for years was the principal vaudeville stand in the city. Then: A 1972 photo of the Loews Theatre, on Ste-Catherine just west of Mansfield St. Built in 1917 by architect Thomas W. Lamb. With more than 3,000 seats, it was the largest in Montreal when it opened, and for years was the principal vaudeville stand in the city. Now: The Loew's Theatre was subdivided into five cinemas in 1976. Boarded up today, the building most recently housed a Foot Locker store. Now: The Loew's Theatre was subdivided into five cinemas in 1976. Boarded up today, the building most recently housed a Foot Locker store. Dave Sidaway / Montreal Gazette Then: The Strand built in 1912 on the southeast corner of Ste-Catherine and Mansfield Sts., and the first major movie theatre in Montreal's downtown. Then: The Strand built in 1912 on the southeast corner of Ste-Catherine and Mansfield Sts., and the first major movie theatre in Montreal's downtown. Roméo Gariepy / collection Cinémathèque québécoise / Roméo Gariepy / collection Cinémathèque québécoise Now: The Strand Theatre ended its days as the Pigalle before being torn down in 1973, with the neighbouring Capitol Theatre, to make way for an office tower. Now: The Strand Theatre ended its days as the Pigalle before being torn down in 1973, with the neighbouring Capitol Theatre, to make way for an office tower. Dave Sidaway / Montreal Gazette Then: The Capitol Theatre, about 1925. The Capitol opened in 1921 on the south side of Ste-Catherine, just west of McGill College Ave. Then: The Capitol Theatre, about 1925. The Capitol opened in 1921 on the south side of Ste-Catherine, just west of McGill College Ave. Now: The Capitol Theatre, along with the neighbouring Strand Theatre, was torn down on this block in 1973, to the chagrin of many Montrealers. Now: The Capitol Theatre, along with the neighbouring Strand Theatre, was torn down on this block in 1973, to the chagrin of many Montrealers. Dave Sidaway / Montreal Gazette Then: A print of the Colonial Theatre from about 1915. The theatre was renamed the Regal in 1920. Then: A print of the Colonial Theatre from about 1915. The theatre was renamed the Regal in 1920. Then: The Palace Theatre on Ste-Catherine St. between McGill College Ave. and University St. The Palace Theatre was built as the Allen Theatre for movies in 1921. Then: The Palace Theatre on Ste-Catherine St. between McGill College Ave. and University St. The Palace Theatre was built as the Allen Theatre for movies in 1921. Now: The site of the old Regal (and Colonial) theatres is now the SuperSexe strip club, and the former Palace Theatre, next door, is a restaurant. Now: The site of the old Regal (and Colonial) theatres is now the SuperSexe strip club, and the former Palace Theatre, next door, is a restaurant. Dave Sidaway / Montreal Gazette Then: The Gaiety Theatre, on the northeast corner of Ste-Catherine and Aylmer Sts., became a movie house in 1909. Renamed the London Theatre around 1912, later renamed The System, renamed Le Cinéma 539 in the 1970s and showed X-rated films. Then: The Gaiety Theatre, on the northeast corner of Ste-Catherine and Aylmer Sts., became a movie house in 1909. Renamed the London Theatre around 1912, later renamed The System, renamed Le Cinéma 539 in the 1970s and showed X-rated films. Dave Sidaway / Montreal Gazette files Now: The exterior of the former Gaiety Theatre remains recognizable. Building most recently housed a store. Now: The exterior of the former Gaiety Theatre remains recognizable. Building most recently housed a store. Dave Sidaway / Montreal Gazette Then: Bennett's Theatre opened in Montreal in 1907, on the north side of Ste-Catherine at City Councillors St. Then: Bennett's Theatre opened in Montreal in 1907, on the north side of Ste-Catherine at City Councillors St. Now: The former Bennett's Theatre, renamed the Orpheum in 1910, is now the site of an office tower. Now: The former Bennett's Theatre, renamed the Orpheum in 1910, is now the site of an office tower. Dave Sidaway / Montreal Gazette Then: A large crowd gathers outside Montreal's Princess Theatre in 1936 during the opening of Charlie Chaplin's "Modern Times". Original Princess was built in 1908, on Ste-Catherine at City Councillors, across the street from Bennett's Theatre. Original theatre burned down in 1915. Then: A large crowd gathers outside Montreal's Princess Theatre in 1936 during the opening of Charlie Chaplin's "Modern Times". Original Princess was built in 1908, on Ste-Catherine at City Councillors, across the street from Bennett's Theatre. Original theatre burned down in 1915. The former Princess Theatre was later renamed Le Parisien, and is now a newly renovated retail outlet up for rent. The former Princess Theatre was later renamed Le Parisien, and is now a newly renovated retail outlet up for rent. Dave Sidaway / Montreal Gazette Imperial Theatre in 1913, the year it opened ion Bleury St., just north of Ste-Catherine. Imperial Theatre in 1913, the year it opened ion Bleury St., just north of Ste-Catherine. Now: The Cinéma Impérial. Now: The Cinéma Impérial. Dave Sidaway / Montreal Gazette Then: An undated photo of Montreal's Nickel Theatre at the southeast corner of Ste-Catherine St. W. and Bleury St. After 1912, it became known as The Tivoli Theatre. It was destroyed in a 1923 fire. Then: An undated photo of Montreal's Nickel Theatre at the southeast corner of Ste-Catherine St. W. and Bleury St. After 1912, it became known as The Tivoli Theatre. It was destroyed in a 1923 fire. Now: There's no trace now of the old Tivoli Theatre on Ste-Catherine St. at Bleury St. Now: There's no trace now of the old Tivoli Theatre on Ste-Catherine St. at Bleury St. Dave Sidaway / Montreal Gazette Then: The Gayety Theatre, in 1957, at the corner Ste-Catherine and St-Urbain Sts. It was the leading burlesque theatre in Montreal in its day, later transformed into the home of the Comédie Canadienne theatre company. Then: The Gayety Theatre, in 1957, at the corner Ste-Catherine and St-Urbain Sts. It was the leading burlesque theatre in Montreal in its day, later transformed into the home of the Comédie Canadienne theatre company. The site of the former Gayety Theatre today is the Théâtre du nouveau monde. The site of the former Gayety Theatre today is the Théâtre du nouveau monde. Dave Sidaway / Montreal Gazette Then: The Ouimetoscope at the corner Ste. Catherine St. E. and Montcalm St., was inaugurated in 1906. Then: The Ouimetoscope at the corner Ste. Catherine St. E. and Montcalm St., was inaugurated in 1906. Now: Condos and a commercial space now occupy the site of the former Ouimetoscope, but a privately erected plaque draws attention to the site's historical significance. Dave Sidaway / Montreal Gazette Then: The Théâtre National, was built in 1900 on the south side of Ste-Catherine at Beaudry St. Considered the oldest French professional theatre in North America. Now: The Théâtre National, built in 1900, is now Le National, a music and live entertainment venue. Dave Sidaway / Montreal Gazette Then and now: The grand old theatres of Ste-Catherine St. From west to east, here are some of the old theatres that once lined the street, along with what the sites look like now. By the end of its reign in the 1990s, the once glorious Loew’s was a five-screen cinema that had been eclipsed by even larger multi-screen movie theatres. The Loew’s was just one of more than a dozen lost movie and live entertainment palaces that once lined Ste-Catherine, long before Gap and Second Cup made their debuts. And you wouldn’t know that, either, because the story of Ste-Catherine’s role as a theatre row cannot be found on the street. Unlike Sherbrooke St. W. to the north, downtown Ste-Catherine boasts no historic plaques to point out its landmarks and recount the street’s history. “It was the Quartier des spectacles before there was Quartier des spectacles,” Heritage Montreal policy director Dinu Bumbaru said of the downtown stretch of Ste-Catherine. He was referring to the name of the entertainment block the city and the provincial government are building around Place des Arts between Ste-Catherine and De Maisonneuve Blvd. east of Bleury St. On its own initiative, Heritage Montreal installed 19 interpretative plaques along Sherbrooke in 1992 for Montreal’s 350th anniversary. It was an ambitious undertaking for a private, non-profit organization as it sought the cooperation of building owners to put up the plaques. The funding was provided by philanthropist Liliane M. Stewart and a number of foundations. Stewart, who presided the Stewart Museum and the Macdonald Stewart Foundation, died in May. The downtown theatres were the most important theatres in town. — Dane Lanken Heritage Montreal also installed 15 plaques around Dorchester Square in 2004. Stewart and the owners of some of the buildings in the area provided the funding. Now, with Montreal’s 375th anniversary coming in 2017, Bumbaru suggested that the city install historic plaques along Ste-Catherine. Coincidentally, city hall is in the midst of developing a revitalization plan for Ste-Catherine between Atwater and Bleury, which creates an opportunity and a budget for such an improvement, he said. Ste-Catherine began life as a residential street. It was transformed starting 120 years ago into an artery of grand stores, churches and theatres. In 1907, the city of Montreal boasted 53 cinema and concert halls and theatres, notes the Répertoire d’architecture traditionnelle, published by the former Montreal Urban Community in 1985. By 1911, the number had grown to 63. Two years later, in 1913, the city had 77 cinemas, concert halls and theatres. The most popular among them were concentrated on the downtown portion of Ste-Catherine. Today, almost all of Ste-Catherine’s early-20th-century theatres have vanished. Even the buildings that housed the theatres are mostly gone. Among the only traces of the street’s past are the Imperial theatre, still showing movies on Bleury just above Ste-Catherine, and the theatre hub formed by such venues as Club Soda, the Metropolis, the Société des arts technologiques and the Monument National at Ste-Catherine and St-Laurent Blvd. “The corner of Ste-Catherine and St-Laurent is the only place where you can still feel the concentration of theatre,” Bumbaru said. Another hint of Ste-Catherine’s connection to old cinema and live theatre is a discreet bronze plaque – again, privately erected – on a building on the southeast corner of Ste-Catherine and Montcalm St., east of the downtown core. A commemorative plaque recognizes Le Ouimetoscope in Montreal. A commemorative plaque recognizes the site of the historic Ouimetoscope theatre on Ste-Catherine St. Dave Sidaway / Montreal Gazette The plaque pays tribute to Léo-Ernest Ouimet, an engineer and projectionist who erected on the street corner what is widely considered to have been the first theatre in Canada built specifically for movies. Ouimet opened the Ouimetoscope in 1906 out of a former recital hall. Soon after, he tore down the building and built a new and fancier Ouimetoscope dedicated to movies, which opened on the same spot in August 1907. The Cinémathèque canadienne (later renamed the Cinémathèque québécoise) put up the plaque in 1966. A commercial and condominium building sits on the site today. Ouimet, meanwhile, sold the Ouimetoscope in 1915 and moved to Hollywood. In 1920, he produced a feature film called Why Get Married? that played at Loew’s Theatre in Montreal, author Dane Lanken writes in his 1993 book Montreal Movie Palaces, a seminal work on the history of Montreal’s grand theatres. Lanken’s book also notes the Ouimetoscope may have been the first fancy movie palace in the world, and not just in Montreal. Lanken was working as a film critic at the Montreal Gazette in the early 1970s when the downtown theatres started to get demolished or have their grand interiors chopped up into multiple cinemas. Palace theatres were going the way of silent movies decades earlier. “It was really the end of the line for the big old theatres,” Lanken said in an interview. He spent 20 years gathering photos and conducting research and interviews on the city’s movie palaces for his book. People by and large lived in very dreary, cold-water flats. But for a quarter, you could go out and sit in this palace. And the doorman would open the door for you, and there would be an usher who would show you to a seat. You were treated royally for 25 cents. — Dane Lanken Lanken wasn’t the only theatre buff to lament the loss of the palace theatres. Montrealer Janet MacKinnon, who fought to preserve historic theatres in Canada, documented the significance of this city’s theatres with her organization, Historic Theatres Trust. MacKinnon died in 2011, but the Historic Theatres Trust collection is now housed at the Canadian Centre for Architecture. The theatres’ history, architecture, ownership and size may be recorded, but Lanken says he agrees with Bumbaru’s suggestion to erect plaques at Ste-Catherine’s landmarks to help keep the history alive. “The downtown theatres were the most important theatres in town,” Lanken said, adding that Montreal’s principal theatres for decades were the Loew’s, the Capitol, the Palace and the Princess, all located within a few blocks of each other on Ste-Catherine. “From the early days of the movies, probably 1920 or so, until the the system broke down around 1970, movies would play first at one of these four downtown theatres,” Lanken said. “And then they would go out on what were called double bills at what were called the neighbourhood houses, like the Monkland in N.D.G., or the Rialto up north (on Parc Ave.). There were a couple dozen of these theatres in the neighbourhoods, but the prestige place to see a movie or for a movie to open in Montreal was at one of these four theatres. That’s why they were so important. And those blocks (along Ste-Catherine) certainly were the Quartier des spectacles of that time.” Most of the early 20th century theatres, such as the Loew’s, offered both films and live theatre. The decorative style of those theatres was classically inspired, based on ancient Greece and Rome, Lanken said. As a result, theatres like the Loew’s boasted columns and plaster low-relief decoration. “The grandeur of these theatres was an important selling point for them,” Lanken said. “People by and large lived in very dreary, cold-water flats. But for a quarter, you could go out and sit in this palace. And the doorman would open the door for you, and there would be an usher who would show you to a seat. You were treated royally for 25 cents.” If the theatres had sprouted somewhat organically on Ste-Catherine in the early 20th century, their destruction was in large part due to an under-appreciation of their architecture, decoration and history, Lanken said. Emblematic of the palace theatres’ plight in the 1970s was the Capitol, on Ste-Catherine just west of McGill College Ave. Lanken calls the Capitol “the greatest theatre ever built in the city.” “It was the grandest, the most spectacular and just about the biggest,” he said. “It’s so rare to walk into a room anywhere where there’s 50 feet of space over your head. But you could certainly get that in a theatre like the Capitol. “A lot of theatres would have walls or columns made of plaster painted to look like marble, but in the Capitol there was real marble. It was a very expensive theatre to build.” The Capitol was built in 1921 by Thomas W. Lamb, the master theatre architect of New York. Lamb who also built the Loew’s and hundreds of theatres across North America, for the then-new Famous Players Canadian Corp., which would become the largest chain in Canada. RELATED A bitter farewell to the Capitol Theatre Now: The Capitol Theatre, along with the neighbouring Strand Theatre, was torn down on this block in 1973, to the chagrin of many Montrealers. Now: The Capitol Theatre, along with the neighbouring Strand Theatre, was torn down on this block in 1973, to the chagrin of many Montrealers. Dave Sidaway / Montreal Gazette In 1973, the Capitol and its neighbour, the Strand, also owned by Famous Players by then, were demolished to make way for an office tower. “They thought there was more money to be made tearing down the theatres and putting up buildings,” Lanken said of Famous Players. It was the era of mayor Jean Drapeau, to boot, so the demolition of the city’s old theatres didn’t seem to bother city officials, he added. However, they were tearing down Montreal’s collective memory. In the early 20th century, the city was on a North American circuit for touring vaudeville acts, Lanken said. Vaudeville shows were a collection of unrelated acts. “It was family entertainment and anybody could go to it,” Lanken said. The Loew’s in its heyday was the main vaudeville venue in Montreal, putting everything from skaters to acrobats to “comedy dancers” on its bill, along with movies. Ste-Catherine also boasted burlesque shows, notably at the Gayety, the leading burlesque theatre in Montreal that was built in 1912 at Ste-Catherine and St-Urbain St. Stripper Lili St. Cyr made her Montreal debut here in 1944, Lanken’s book explains. It has been home to the Théâtre du nouveau monde since 1972. “Burlesque was vaudeville, except that it had a stripper in it and maybe a chorus line,” Lanken said. “And a dirty comedian was a hallmark of it, as well.” Then: A large crowd gathers outside Montreal's Princess Theatre in 1936 during the opening of Charlie Chaplin's "Modern Times". Original Princess was built in 1908, on Ste-Catherine at City Councillors, across the street from Bennett's Theatre. Original theatre burned down in 1915. Then: A large crowd gathers outside Montreal’s Princess Theatre in 1936 during the opening of Charlie Chaplin’s “Modern Times”.<br />Original Princess was built in 1908, on Ste-Catherine at City Councillors, across the street from Bennett’s Theatre. Original theatre burned down in 1915. Montreal Gazette files Vaudeville disappeared with the advent of “talkies” around 1929, but the Loew’s continued its program of vaudeville and movies for another decade, Lanken said. The Loew’s brought American comedic entertainer Red Skelton to Montreal before his rise from vaudeville to radio and television. Another performer to hit the stage at the Loew’s was Sally Rand, whom Hollywood filmmaker Cecil B. DeMille put in silent movies in the 1920s and who was billed as the world’s most famous fan dancer when she appeared on the bill at Loew’s in 1935 with her vaudeville act. It was said to be tamer than her burlesque act, in which she would use two ostrich feathers to playfully reveal parts of her body – minus the naughtiest parts — as she danced to Claude Debussy’s Clair de Lune. By the time Leonard Schlemm was taking his first dates to the Loew’s as a McGill University commerce undergrad in the early 1970s, the theatre was strictly showing movies. But the grandeur and elegance of the theatre hasn’t faded for Schlemm, who opened the Mansfield Athletic Club inside the belly of what used to be the Loew’s in 2005. The Loew’s had been built for Marcus Loew, who by 1917 already owned 100 theatres across the U.S. and Canada and would later be a co-founder of Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer in Hollywood. With over 3,000 seats, the Loew’s was the city’s largest theatre when it opened. In 2001, Club Med World spent $8 million to renovate the then-vacant space and turn it into an entertainment complex. When the venture failed, the property was divided into two lots, one for the former entrance of the theatre on Ste-Catherine, which was rented to a shoe store, and the other for the interior belly, which opens on Mansfield. The Mansfield side remained empty until Schlemm’s real-estate agent scouted it in 2004 as a potential downtown location for the international fitness centre operator to open a new club. Schlemm had opened a gym in a smaller theatre in Madrid, Spain, and says he saw the potential for the former Loew’s. He bought the nearly 50,000-square-foot lot from a real-estate company that had bought the entire property from Club Med World. The storefront portion on Ste-Catherine, still owned by the real-estate company, has long since lost the old theatre facade. The construction work going on behind the plywood now is on the modern glass exterior, the borough of Ville-Marie says. The work is being done to make way for a new commercial tenant. However, the interior of the former Loew’s is still evident inside Schlemm’s Mansfield Athletic Club, including the high ceilings and a mural. Four of the original architectural drawings for the theatre adorn a wall that leads into the workout space. While many of the grand theatres have been razed, the classically-inspired interior of the former Loew's is still evident inside the Mansfield Athletic Club, including the high ceilings and a mural. While many of the grand theatres have been razed, the classically-inspired interior of the former Loew’s is still evident inside the Mansfield Athletic Club, including the high ceilings and a mural. Peter McCabe / MONTREAL GAZETTE “Club Med had done an excellent job of refurbishing it,” Schlemm said, adding that the company preserved the decorations from the old theatre. (Lanken credits architect Mandel Sprachman for his “sensitive” renovation when he was hired in 1975 to split the Loew’s into a five-cinema theatre. Sprachman saved the dome in the ceiling and decorative elements on the walls to make it possible to one day restore the interior to its former glory.) Schlemm says he likes the idea of erecting plaques for the theatre landmarks along Ste-Catherine. At the same time, he says he recognizes that the city may have other pressing financial needs. So for now, the preservation of Montreal’s theatre row on Ste-Catherine – its history, its spirits and its few remaining fragments, anyway – relies on the will of individuals such as Schlemm and Lanken. A more concerted effort is needed, Bumbaru says. After all, it’s a street where an important piece of Montreal’s story may be lurking behind any ordinary-looking storefront sent via Tapatalk
  2. The Eaton Center looks to be undergoing a small renovation of the Ste-Catherine entrance. So far they removed the ugly overhead protectors over the side walk and the larger one over the doors.
  3. Il s'agit de la rénovation et agrandissement d'un petit immeuble sur la rue St-Hubert (entre Ste-Catherine et René-Lévesque) http://lestat.ca/
  4. Projet de rénovation / conversion de deux immeubles sur St-Alexandre côté ouest au sud de Ste-Catherine. Un des immeubles appartenait à l'UQAM, notre chère université nationaliste. Je ne trouve plus le thread sur ce project, en savez-vous davantage? Merci!
  5. FINANCIAL POST http://network.nationalpost.com/np/blogs/fpposted/archive/2007/11/15/the-rebirth-of-downtown-montreal.aspx Posted: November 15, 2007, 2:46 AM by DrewHasselback Montreal Downtown Montreal is going through a rapid revitalization that has seen the rise of condo towers, university buildings, hotels -- and major international retailers. Nowhere is this more apparent than the corner of Peel and Ste-Catherine, one of the city's busiest spots. "The corner has always had a certain amount of vibrancy," says Sam Sheraton, senior administrator for Montreal's Drazin family, which owns property near Peel and Ste-Catherine. "Now, it has become the central core of downtown Montreal." One-level retailers who once occupied 1,500-to 2,000-square-foot spaces and generated sales of about $400 to $600 per square foot are making way for bigger, multi-level stores that bring in twice as much. A large Roots store on the northeast corner of Peel and Ste-Catherine recently downsized and hot U.S. retailer American Eagle Outfitters moved in. On the northwest corner, a Guess store opens next month. Next door on Ste-Catherine is the year-old flagship store of Montreal's own Garage chain, one of Canada's top fashion retailers. And on the southwest side, several retailers, including a Rogers phone store and SAQ liquor outlet, are being relocated by the owner, to make way for a multilevel H& M store, industry sources say. (On the remaining southeast corner is an HMV store, in the same building as the Montreal Gazette and National Post bureau). Rumour has it Pottery Barn is looking for a location nearby. A few blocks to the west on Ste-Catherine, next to Ogilvy's, Apple is taking a space formerly occupied by a menswear store. Sean Silcoff
  6. Questions simples; Quel sont selon vous les terrains vacant ou stationnement les plus apte à être développer en ce moment à Montréal. Plus communément appeler en anglais "Prime Real-Estate" Par exemple, les miens sont L'îlot Overdale De Loirmier et Ste-Catherine. Stationnements de la Maison Radio-Canada Merci de vos suggestions.
  7. Plan du Quartier des Spectacles Masterplan Si j’ai oublié des projets, n’hésitez pas à me le dire ! ------------------------------- 1 : Lofts des Arts, phase 1 - 10 étages 2 : Lofts des Arts, phase 2 - 25 étages 3 : Terrain vague, métro St-Laurent 4 : Redéveloppement de la rue Ste-Catherine 5 : 2-22 Ste-Catherine - 6 étages 6 : Agrandissement / rénovation de la S.A.T. - 4 étages 7 : Quadrilatère St-Laurent ~ 5 étages 8 : Maison du développement durable - 5 étages 9 : Le Parterre / Esplanade Clark 10 : Promenade des artistes 11 : Salle de l'OSM 12 : Rénovation Place des arts / Grand foyer culturel 13 : Place des festivals 14 : 400 Sherbrooke ouest - 38 étages 15 : Le Concorde - 19 étages 16 : Louis-Bohème - 28 étages 17 : Mise en lumière du GESÙ 18 : Place du SPECTRUM / Complexe SIDEV - 26 étages 19 : LADMMI et Tangente 20 : Édifice Wilder 21 : Édifice des Grands ballets canadiens de Montréal 22 : Maison du jazz 23 : Théâtre du Nouveau Monde, phase 2 24 : Condos Dell'Arte
  8. Localisation: Rue De Lorimier et Ste-Catherine (ancien site de l'usine UDT) Étage: 7 Nombre d'appartement: 62 Clientèle: famille Référence: La Presse
  9. Immeuble d'une dizaine d'étages en rénovation sur Bleury au sud de Ste-Catherine, côté est, just au sud du Spectrum. Savez-vous de quoi il s'agit? Merci!
  10. Je vis à Toronto depuis plus de trois ans, et je ne rentre à Montréal qu’une à deux fois par année pour le boulot et m’occuper de mon condo. La dernière fois que j’étais à Montréal c’était en mai dernier. Ce weekend passé, j’ai fait un tour rapide de quelques quartiers et je voulais partager mes impressions et vous demander votre avis. En voici quelques-unes. (Aussi, il ne s’agit que d’observations esthétiques sur la ville, je ne veux pas recommencer une discussion politique ou une aures comparaison avec Toronto.) 1- Le coin St-Laurent / Sherbrooke fait dur : Plusieurs restos au nord de Sherbrooke ont fermés. C’est un peu désolant car c’était le tronçon de rue super actif il y a 3-5 ans. 2- Beaucoup de commerces ont fermés sur Ste-Catherine à l’est de St-Alexandre. C’est un tronçon de rue qui est devenu glauque. 3- Plusieurs gros espaces commerciaux sur Ste-Catherine sont vacants : L’ancien esprit, l’ancien cinéma Parisien... Qu'est-ce qui se passe? 4- Beaucoup de construction : Je suis venu par le train, et l’entrée dans Griffintown est plein de grues. Ça me rappelle Libertyville à Toronto. J'ai hâte de voir le quartier habité. 5- Furco est vraiment génial. Une expérience assez unique a Montréal. Belle initiative des entrepreneurs. 6- La bouffe est toujours aussi bonne. Restaurants visités: Toi & Moi Café pour le brunch, Chez Lévesque pour diner, Le Comptoir pour le brunch.
  11. L'arrondissement de Ville-Marie comptera 10 nouveaux projets immobiliers totalisant des investissements de 600 M$. Ces projets fourniront 1 600 nouveaux logements et 51 600 mètres carrés d'espaces à bureaux.  Un projet résidentiel et commercial sur le site Overdale, comprenant la restauration de la maison Hippolyte-Lafontaine qui deviendra un centre d'interprétation ouvert au public  Une tour résidentielle de 34 étages sur la rue de la Concorde dans le Quartier des spectacle  Un bâtiment mixte à l'ancienne brasserie Ekers, au coin du boulevard St-Laurent et de la rue St-Norbert  Des tours jumelles de 35 étages sur le boulevard René-Lévesque, entre les rues Drummond et de la Montagne  Un bâtiment mixte de 11 étages sur la rue Crescent entre la rue Ste-Catherine et le boulevard René-Lévesque  Un tour à bureaux de 27 étages à l'îlot Windsor  L'agrandissement du magasin Ogilvy et l'aménagement d'un nouveau complexe hôtelier et résidentiel  Des tours résidentielles de 21 et 23 étages, totalisant 327 logements, sur la rue Drummond, entre la rue Ste-Catherine et le boulevard René-Lévesque  Conversion d'un édifice à bureaux en bâtiment résidentiel, abritant 40 logements, au coin du boulevard de Maisonneuve et de la rue Bishop  Un bâtiment résidentiel de sept étages et de 48 logements sur la rue Bishop, entre la rue Ste-Catherine et le boulevard René-Lévesque montreal2025.com
  12. Only ten years ago, but still interesting. Mostly commercial changes on Ste-Catherine, but also construction of the Demetrius, Cinema Parisien, St-James United Church restoration, and a few others!
  13. I noticed that this building is under going major renovations, anyone know what's going on?
  14. voici les mots clefs avec le nombre de visites associé! mtlurb 583 monocle top cities 243 1300 rené lévesque canceled 115 montreal urbain forum malek 109 mtlurb forum 47 mtlurb malek 15 la presse longue-pointe 7 club le sommet 4 mtlurb.com 4 photos construction metro montreal 4 villa latella mont-carmel 4 zilli montreal 4 adidas rue ste-catherine 3 banlieues de montréal 3 vincent pontbriand 3 "350 maisonneuve" montreal 2 "400 sherbrooke ouest" 2 alstef beumer video 2 club sommet condos 2 construction anciennes 2 flight plattsburgh floride 2 floery mahoney 2 gifts forums 2 louis boheme 2 milboul 2 mtl12 2 photos vancouver 2007 2 unicef nascar 2 "701 university" montreal 1 "anton & james" urban cafeteria 1 "catherine handfield" 1 "emmanuel blain cosgrove" 1 "erica johnston" montreal 1 "floery mahoney" florida 1 "germain lariviere" 1 "hugo fontaine" 1 "hélène bétito" 1 "jean chainey"" 1 "lieux abandonnés" montréal 1 "mario di palma"+montreal 1 "monocle top 20 most liveable cities" 1 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  15. Prix MtlURB 2012 : Infrastructure 2011 *** 1 – Pont de la 25 http://www.mtlurb.com/forums/showthread.php/118 2 – Redéveloppement de la rue Ste-Catherine http://www.mtlurb.com/forums/showthread.php/15186 3 – Centre Sportif NDG http://www.mtlurb.com/forums/showthread.php/18564 4 – Place Claude-Léveillée http://www.mtlurb.com/forums/showthread.php/4527 (Photo: Alarie Photos) 5 – Place d’Armes http://www.mtlurb.com/forums/showthread.php/226
  16. Je n'ai pas trouvé de fil existant, et ça semble quand même remplir un gros trou sur Ste-Catherine. La pancarte ne me semble pas récente par contre.
  17. Des pancartes dans les fenêtres d'un local sur Ste-Catherine est, côté nord, entre Amherst et Berri: Five Guys Hamburger : Bientôt! Nous embauchons! J'essaierai de penser à prendre des photos.
  18. Salut à tous, J'aimerais avoir votre opinion sur une idée que j'ai eu aujourd'hui. Outre vos commentaires sur l'idée elle-même, j'aimerais surtout avoir des suggestions quant à la stratégie à adopter afin de faire réaliser un tel projet (qui contacter, comment s'y prendre, etc.). Merci! --- Avec le développement du Quartier des Spectacles, et avec le Village gay et le secteur commercial le plus dense au Canada, la rue Ste-Catherine est certainement l'une des artères les plus intéressantes en Amérique du Nord. Elle pourrait peut-être même être considérée comme l'une des meilleures au monde... si ce n'était de ce no man's land, ce secteur dénué d'âme qui se siue entre Berri et St-Laurent, soit entre le Village et le Quartier des Spectacles. J'ai pensé à un concept de développement pour ce secteur, afin de le rendre attrayant. Il s'agirait d'un secteur de transition entre le Village et le QdS, qui aurait néanmoins une identité propre. Le concept que j'ai en tête est le suivant: le secteur serait divisé en trois zones/tronçons (voir le 2e fichier joint) ayant chacun un thème particulier. La première zone, qui ferait la transition avec le QdS, aurait pour thème l'ART; la deuxième, faisant échos aux édifices de l'UQÀM, aurait pour thème le SAVOIR; et la troisième, faisant la transition avec le Quartier Gai, aurait pour thème la DIVERSITÉ. Deux éléments permettraient de reconnaître l'identité de chaque zone. D'abord, la pièce maîtresse de mon concept: d'un bout à l'autre de ce secteur, il y aurait un mince ilôt au centre de la rue Ste-Catherine (entre les deux voies), où une structure permettrait d'afficher des oeuvres de grande taille (photos, tableaux, etc.). Les passants pourraient admirer les oeuvres des deux côtés de la rue. Dans la zone ART, on retrouverait sur l'îlot des oeuvres artistiques ; dans la zone DIVERSITÉ, on retrouverait des oeuvres illustrant la diversité humaine.... vous saisissez le concept. Les oeuvres présentées seraient des expositions temporaires, pouvant être renouvellées sur une base plus ou moins régulière. Bref, les touristes visiteraient ce secteur afin d'y découvrir les différentes expositions. En plus d'être un lieu de transition entre deux quartiers, ce secteur deviendrait une destination en elle-même. Le deuxième élément consisterait en la construction de grandes arches à l'entrée de chacune des trois zones. Ces arches seraient des portes d'entrée permettant d'identifer la saveur thématique de la zone dans laquelle le passant est sur le point de pénétrer. Outre ces deux éléments principaux, on pourrait réaménager le parterre à la manière du Quartier des Spectacles, planter des arbres, proposer un mobilier urbain audacieux, etc. Je crois que toutes ces modifications permettraient de transformer un secteur sans saveur en une destination touristique d'envergure, et de faire de la rue Ste-Catherine une artère capable de rivaliser avec la Rambla de Barcelone et les autres artères majestueuses à travers la planète. Qu'en pensez-vous? Le Philosophe
  19. <object width="1280" height="745"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VHv3QYvpHf0&hl=en_US&fs=1&hd=1"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VHv3QYvpHf0&hl=en_US&fs=1&hd=1" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true" width="1280" height="745"></embed></object>
  20. I have a question: Why would city officials allow Segafredo to have a cheap terrace blocking half of the sidewalk on Ste-Catherine yet at the same time refuse to allow Apple to pay for 3 less parking spots in front of its store? It dosn't make any sense. Corruption or incompetence? I would like to hear your views on this. Thank you.
  21. Voici pourquoi St-Urbain est fermé au niveau de Ste-Catherine depuis un petit moment. On ne voit pas tellement bien sur la photo, mais il y a une série de patchage tout croche... vraiment je pense qu'on est des experts la dedans à Montréal... on devrait au moins mettre de la couleur, ça ferait un peu plus original.
  22. D'une source incertaine, j'ai appris que la bijouterie au coin de Ste-Catherine et de St-Alexandre (coin nord-est) avait été ou est sur le point d'être vendue pour un projet mixte incluant un section résidentielle. Connaissez-vous ce projet? *Il n'est pas à confondre avec celui sur St-Alexandre au sud de Ste-Catherine (l'ancien pavillon de l'UQAM). Merci!
  23. The Gazette 1974 / Étude pour mail couvert sur la rue Ste-Catherine, Montréal Bythe way Malek, how come I can't start a new thread???? That's why I put this one here!! :rotfl: :rotfl: :confused: :confused: :eek: :chillpill: :yikes: :openmouth: :eek2: :duh: :eek: :dizzy:
  24. 1912 1911 1911 1910 1911 1913 La réception ducale à Montréal : Les décorations : 1) L'édifice de La Presse ; 2) Arc de triomphe McGill ; 3) Arc des citoyens, angle Peel et Sherbrooke ; 4) Arc, angle Windsor et Dorchester ; 5) Arc, angle St-Denis et Sherbrooke ; 6) Vue de la rue St-Jacques ; 7) Rue Windsor, près Ste-Catherine ; 8) Arc, place Jacques-Cartier ; 9) La gare Windsor ; 10) Rue Sherbrooke, près St-Laurent