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  1. http://montrealgazette.com/news/local-news/good-architecture-pays-french-expert <header class="entry-header" style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: 15px; line-height: 24px; font-family: BentonSans-Regular, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(0, 0, 0);">The good, the bad and the ugly: French expert assesses Montreal architecture MARIAN SCOTT, MONTREAL GAZETTE More from Marian Scott, Montreal Gazette Published on: April 13, 2016 | Last Updated: April 13, 2016 7:00 AM EDT </header><figure class="align-none wp-caption post-img" id="post-783124media-783124" itemprop="associatedMedia" itemscope="" itemid="http://wpmedia.montrealgazette.com/2016/04/montreal-que-april-6-2016-emmanuel-caille-is-an-edito.jpeg?quality=55&strip=all&w=840&h=630&crop=1" itemtype="http://schema.org/ImageObject" style="margin: 0px 0px 2em; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: inherit; line-height: inherit; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; overflow: hidden; color: rgb(255, 255, 255); float: none;"><figcaption class="wp-caption-text" itemprop="description" style="margin: -1px 0px 0px; padding: 10px; border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: inherit; line-height: inherit; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; zoom: 1; text-align: right; background: rgb(12, 12, 12);"> Emmanuel Calle, editor of the French architecture magazine "d'a", at the Canadian Centre for Architecture. Caille shared his thoughts on Montreal's architecture. MARIE-FRANCE COALLIER </figcaption></figure>SHAREADJUSTCOMMENTPRINT What would an international expert think of Montreal’s recent architecture? To find out, the Montreal Gazette took French architecture critic Emmanuel Caille on a walking tour of downtown and Griffintown. He also visited the $52.6-million indoor soccer stadium that opened last year in the St-Michel district. Caille, the editor of the Paris-based architecture magazine “d’a”, was in town to take part in a panel discussion last week on architectural criticism, organized by the Maison de l’architecture du Québec and the Royal Architectural Institute of Canada (RAIC). Caille’s verdict on our fair city ranged from a thumbs-up for the pricey new soccer stadium to shocked incredulity over a new hotel annex to the Mount Stephen Club, a historic mansion at 1440 Drummond St. <figure id="attachment_783141" class="wp-caption post-img size_this_image_test align-center" itemprop="associatedMedia" itemscope="" itemid="photo url" itemtype="http://schema.org/ImageObject" style="margin: 0px auto 15px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: inherit; line-height: inherit; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; overflow: hidden; color: rgb(255, 255, 255); float: none; max-width: 100%; width: 1000px;"><figcaption class="wp-caption-text wp-caption" style="margin: -1px 0px 0px; padding: 10px; border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: inherit; line-height: inherit; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; zoom: 1; text-align: right; background: rgb(12, 12, 12);"> The Mount Stephen Club. DARIO AYALA / MONTREAL GAZETTE </figcaption></figure>Built from 1880-83 for Lord Mount Stephen, the first president of the Canadian Pacific Railway, it has been in the news recently after suffering structural damage during construction of the annex. Caille, an architect as well as an editor, did not comment on the structural problems, but he did give a visual assessment of the hotel addition, an 11-storey cement-panel structure tucked behind the mansion. “It’s quite brutal in the city,” he said. From de Maisonneuve Blvd., the hotel addition presents a view of three blank walls with a shed-style roof. “It’s astonishing. It’s bizarre,” he said. Caille was also perplexed by the front façade, dotted with small windows of different sizes. “What is not obvious is what relationship there is between this building and the mansion. I don’t see any,” he added. The hotel addition shows why projects should not be conceived in isolation, Caille said. City planners should have put forward a vision for the entire block, which includes an outdoor parking lot on de la Montagne St. that would have made a better site for a high rise, he said. Interesting alleyways and outdoor spaces could have been included, he said. “Everybody is turning their back to one another,” he said of how the different properties on the block don’t relate to each other. At the Ritz-Carlton hotel on Sherbrooke St., Caille said a glass condo addition completed in 2013 is a good example of how to update a historic building for modern use. But he criticized white PVC windows on the hotel’s Sherbrooke St. façade for their thick frames and mullions, which don’t suit the building. “That’s horrible,” he said. “Windows are the eyes of a building. When women use an eye pencil to emphasize their eyes, it changes everything.” <figure id="attachment_783158" class="wp-caption post-img size_this_image_test align-center" itemprop="associatedMedia" itemscope="" itemid="photo url" itemtype="http://schema.org/ImageObject" style="margin: 0px auto 15px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: inherit; line-height: inherit; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; overflow: hidden; color: rgb(255, 255, 255); float: none; max-width: 100%; width: 997px;"><figcaption class="wp-caption-text wp-caption" style="margin: -1px 0px 0px; padding: 10px; border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: inherit; line-height: inherit; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; zoom: 1; text-align: right; background: rgb(12, 12, 12);"> Construction workers work on the District Griffin condo project in Griffintown. DARIO AYALA / MONTREAL GAZETTE </figcaption></figure>In Griffintown, Caille was unimpressed by the banal architecture of condo towers that have sprouted in recent years in the former industrial district, which is undergoing rapid transformation. But the former Dow Planetarium at 1000 St-Jacques St. W. caught his eye. Built in 1966, it closed in 2011. The city turned it over to the Université du Québec’s École de technologie supérieure in 2013. ÉTS announced it would transform the building into a “creativity hub” but so far the building has sat vacant. Caille said the domed landmark has great potential to be recycled for a new vocation. “When a building is dirty and dilapidated, people don’t see its beauty. You have to see the beauty underneath the neglect,” he said. Today there is a consensus that older heritage buildings should be preserved but it’s still difficult to rally public opinion behind buildings from more recent eras, like the 1960s, Caille said. <figure id="attachment_783147" class="wp-caption post-img size_this_image_test align-center" itemprop="associatedMedia" itemscope="" itemid="photo url" itemtype="http://schema.org/ImageObject" style="margin: 0px auto 15px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: inherit; line-height: inherit; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; overflow: hidden; color: rgb(255, 255, 255); float: none; max-width: 100%; width: 1000px;"><figcaption class="wp-caption-text wp-caption" style="margin: -1px 0px 0px; padding: 10px; border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: inherit; line-height: inherit; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; zoom: 1; text-align: right; background: rgb(12, 12, 12);"> The 26-storey Deloitte Tower between Windsor Station and the Bell Centre. DARIO AYALA / MONTREAL GAZETTE </figcaption></figure>The Deloitte Tower, a new 26-storey glass office tower between the Bell Centre and Windsor Station, is nothing to write home about, in Caille’s opinion. “It’s developer architecture,” he said. “There’s nothing interesting about it.” Built by developer Cadillac Fairview, it is part of the $2-billion, nine-tower Quad Windsor project. That includes the 50-storey Tour des Canadiens, which will be Montreal’s tallest condo tower for about a year, until the even taller nearby L’Avenue tower is completed. Most people don’t notice the difference between good and bad architecture when a building is new, Caille said. But over time, the defects of bad buildings grow increasingly obvious, while the good ones become beloved monuments, he said. “People go to New York to see the architecture of the 1920s and 30s,” he said, referring to landmarks like the 1931 Empire State Building and 1928 Chrysler Building. “Good architecture always pays off in the long term.” Unfortunately, much development is driven by short-term considerations, he said. While a developer can walk away from a mediocre building once it’s sold, city-dwellers are stuck with it, he said. “For him, it’s no problem. But for the city, it’s a tragedy,” he said. “Today’s architecture is tomorrow’s heritage,” he noted. Caille is a strong proponent of architectural competitions, which he sees as a way to seek out the best talents and ideas. “It forces people to think and it shows that for every problem, there are many solutions. It’s a way of accessing brainpower,” he said. <figure id="attachment_783196" class="wp-caption post-img size_this_image_test align-center" itemprop="associatedMedia" itemscope="" itemid="photo url" itemtype="http://schema.org/ImageObject" style="margin: 0px auto 15px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: inherit; line-height: inherit; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; overflow: hidden; color: rgb(255, 255, 255); float: none; max-width: 100%; width: 1000px;"><figcaption class="wp-caption-text wp-caption" style="margin: -1px 0px 0px; padding: 10px; border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: inherit; line-height: inherit; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; zoom: 1; text-align: right; background: rgb(12, 12, 12);"> Kids arrive at the the new soccer complex at the Complexe environnemental St-Michel. PHIL CARPENTER /MONTREAL GAZETTE </figcaption></figure>The St-Michel soccer stadium has been criticized for its high price tag but Caille hailed it as an example of excellent design. The ecological building designed by Saucier & Perrotte has three glass walls overlooking a park in the St-Michel environmental complex. Caille said the stadium could be a catalyst for improvements in the hardscrabble north-end neighbourhood. During Tuesday’s panel discussion, Paul Goldberger, a Pulitzer Prize-winning former architecture critic for the New York Times and the New Yorker, said that unlike other types of journalists, architectural critics rarely have an immediate impact on public opinion. “Architectural criticism must take a very long view,” he said. “One learns to think of one’s influence as more gradual, as shifting tastes and judgment over time.” Goldberger, author of books including Why Architecture Matters, published in 2009, has written that the critic’s job is not to push for a particular architectural style, but rather to advocate for the best work possible. He said the time in his career when architectural criticism enjoyed greatest prominence was following Sept. 11, 2001, during discussions over the rebuilding of the World Trade Center. “It was a time when architectural criticism really was, I think, front and centre in the public discourse,” he said. “There it was so clear that an issue of architecture was intimately connected to significant world affairs and one did not have to struggle to help people understand the connection between architecture and the rest of the world,” said Goldberger, who now writes for Vanity Fair and teaches at The New School in New York. In a 2011 review of the new World Trade Center for the New Yorker, Goldberger said the design by architect Daniel Libeskind “struck a careful balance between commemorating the lives lost and reestablishing the life of the site itself.” The panel discussion followed the awarding of two $1,000 prizes to young writers for architectural writing on the topic of libraries. The winning entries by Marie-Pier Bourret-Lafleur and Kristen Smith will be published respectively in Argus and Canadian Architect magazines. [email protected] Twitter.com/JMarianScott
  2. 8960 St Michel, Montréal 54 unités 3 1/2, 4 1/2, 5 1/2 À partir de 140 500$ taxes incluses * Finition de qualité (choix de couleurs) * Planchers de bois * Air climatisé * Grands balcons * Stationnements disponibles * 15 000 pi. ca. d'espace commercial à louer * Subvention disponible * Ascenseur
  3. The quarry St-Michel I believe near autoroute 125 and the second being close to autoroute papineau... This area is baffling me. So much unused and wasted land that can be used for something better. Maybe housing developments or something else? Do you think the city is actually going to do something about this zone? Here's the sites in question: http://maps.google.ca/maps?hl=en&ll=45.563583,-73.636261&spn=0.000008,0.010568&z=17&vpsrc=6&layer=c&cbll=45.563583,-73.636261&cbp=12,0,,0,0&photoid=po-46317218 http://maps.google.ca/maps?hl=en&ll=45.5575,-73.622802&spn=0.00003,0.042272&vpsrc=6&layer=c&cbll=45.5575,-73.622802&cbp=12,0,,0,0&photoid=po-38890502&z=15
  4. Looks like Samcon design is catching up with the late 90s! http://www.samcon.ca/104-condos-a-vendre/Villeray-Saint-Michel-Parc-Extension-Le-LDV.html
  5. Le 3889 se trouve en plein quartier du Petit-Maghreb ou plutot juste au sur du quartier St-Michel. Il sera sur la rue Jean-Talon entre St-Michel et Pie-IX. C'est un quartier en développement qui a besoin d'un "push'' et d'une plus grande densité pour faire profiter les commerces qui sont principalement issue des communautés maghrebines. C'est l'idensité de ce petit coin de ville. Malheureusement ce petit projet ne semble pas très prometteur. Premièrement il n'est que de 3 étages et demi, ou 4 si l'on compte la terrasse. Sur Jean-Talon on aurait aimer un 6 étages, minimum, voir un 8 ou 10. Mais il faudra accepter que la ville (ou l'arrondissement) n'est pas intéressé à une vraie densification. Dommage. http://www.constructionbeau-vain.com/projet-condominiums-a-vendre-montreal-3889.php [ATTACH=CONFIG]2457[/ATTACH][ATTACH=CONFIG]2458[/ATTACH]
  6. 'Iconic' park will rise from former St-Michel dump Kevin Mio, Montreal Gazette More from Kevin Mio, Montreal Gazette Published on: August 28, 2015 | Last Updated: August 28, 2015 3:32 PM EDT What was once a quarry and garbage dump that has marred the city’s St-Michel district for decades will soon become one of Montreal’s — if not the world’s — most iconic parks, Mayor Denis Coderre said on Friday. The St-Michel Environmental Complex will be transformed into the city’s second-largest park, behind Mount Royal, beginning with several new sections that are to be opened to the public for the first time in 2017, in time for the city’s 375th birthday. The whole project is slated to be completed by 2023, Coderre said. “New York has its Central Park, Paris has its Luxembourg Gardens, London has its Hyde Park. If it is true that the major cities of the world can be recognized by their legendary green spaces, Montreal has certainly not been left out,” the mayor said as he made the announcement standing in front of what will become a 12.5 hectare wooded area and lookout in a few years. “We already have Mount Royal Park, our largest park, and in a few years we will soon have another equally iconic (park) right here,” he said. “This transformation represents one of the most ambitious environmental rehabilitation projects ever undertaken in an urban environment in North America,” Coderre said. “We are building a park out of a site that contains 40 million tonnes of garbage.” The cost of this phase of the project is $33.7 million, which the city is paying for from its capital works budget. The final price tag for the remainder of the work is not known. However, Coderre said whatever money is needed will be made available to complete the project. Once finished, the park will include thousands of trees, a lake, wooded areas, pathways, rest spots, an outdoor theatre and more. Anie Samson, the mayor of the Villeray — Saint-Michel — Park Extension borough and member of the executive committee, said the transformation shows that the impossible is possible. “Today is a big day for us and it is one more step forward toward the realization of our dreams (for St-Michel),” she said. “For the past 20 or 30 years, (residents) had a dump over there. Now it is going to be one of the biggest and nicest parks in the world,” Samson said. By 2017, just over 17 hectares of park space will be open to the public. In all, the park will occupy 153 hectares of the 192-hectare site. “A lot of people are talking about sustainable development, but what does it mean? I think we have a living proof here,” Coderre said. “We are providing today a new definition of how to revitalize an area. Frankly, at the end of the day … a lot of people are inspired by other cities. Trust me, this one will be an inspiration for the rest of the world.” Journalists were given a bus tour of the site Friday morning, which included a drive into the lowest point of the former quarry, which will eventually become the lake. It will be five times as big as Beaver Lake on Mount Royal. The lake will be filled with run-off water from the park and will be treated to make it safe to be used for boating and kayaking, but not for swimming. The second major project is a new entrance way to the park along Papineau Ave. that will include, among other things, a sliding area for winter activities, public spaces and areas where people can rest or play outdoor games such as Frisbee or flying kites. Two other sections already opened to the public will be reconfigured and new entrances constructed. There is already a pathway that rings the entire complex, but this is the first time the public will be allowed onto the landfill site. But how they will get to the park, near the corner of Papineau Ave. and Jarry St., is another question since public transit to the area is far from ideal. Coderre said they are working on a plan to address that issue. “We can have the nicest park, but it has to be accessible,” Coderre said. “We want Montrealers to be able to take advantage of the park so there will be an action plan for public transit, a mobility plan.” One challenge city officials face is how to camouflage the more than 500 wells that dot the site. They serve as monitoring stations for the biogas which is emitted by the buried garbage and the city must find a way to hide them while still allowing them to be accessible to workers for repairs. At the same time, they must prevent vandalism. The biogas is recovered and used as fuel on site by Gazmont, producing enough electricity for 2,000 homes. The company signed a new deal this year to recuperate the gas for 25 years once renovations are completed in 2016. The electricity is sold to Hydro-Québec, with the city getting 11.4 per cent of total sales per year. [email protected] http://montrealgazette.com/news/local-news/iconic-park-will-rise-from-former-st-michel-dump
  7. Je croyais qu'on avait un fil sur ce petit projet mais si c'est le cas excuser moi du dédoublement. Sinon, voilà un autre petit projet de 3 étages tout près du LDV (Leonardo Da Vinci) dans le quartier St-Michel entre Jean-talon et le Métropolitain. Rien de spécial mais les trous se bouchent dans ce coin. http://www.mondev.ca/condo-montreal-entre-139900-et-217700-le-everett-50-pc-vendu-livraison-juillet-2011-_fr.html?ProjetID=103
  8. Voici l'autoroute métropolitaine d'ouest en est photographiée du haut des airs aux alentours de 1969 ( date à confirmer ) Enjoy ! Cote-de-Liesse Décarie Rockland L'Acadie St-Laurent Papineau St-Michel Viau Celle la je ne sais pas ?? Anjou
  9. "Officialiser'' les quartiers ethniques de Montréal est-ce que vous pensez que c'est une bonne chose ? Nous avons déjà le Quartier chinois (Chinatown) et la Petite Italie (Pica Italia) ou St-Léonard mais est-ce que d'autres coins devraient avoir une appellation plus spécifiqe pour mieux refléter l'image du quartier en question ? Je pense au quartier grec qui tarde à arriver (mais qui nous a été promis), au quartier portugais qui ne demande que cela, au quartier du Petit Maghreb qui vient à peine d'etre reconnu (Si je ne me trompe pas), mais il y a aussi d'autres endroits comme: St-Michel (pour les haitiens), une partie de St-Laurent (pour les libanais), une partie de Lasalle près du temple sikh (pour les sikhs ), Parc-Extension (pour les pakistanais et/ou les indiens), Beaubien entre St-Laurent et St-Hubert (pour les latinos), Hutchison/Van Horne approximativement (pour les hassidims), etc... Je ne fais que poser la question, tout simplement. Qu'en pensez-vous ?
  10. http://lesconstructionsdla.com/accueil.asp Construction de six (6) unités de condos avec fenestration sur 3 côtés. La livraison est prévue pour février 2012. La bâtisse est divisée en 2 blocs. Le Bloc A aura son entrée sur St-Michel et le Bloc B sur l’avenue Shelley. Afin de situer le terrain, rendez-vous au 7165 rue St-Michel là où la bâtisse sera détruite. À 2 minutes du Métro St-Michel, il y aura 4 unités de 4 ½ (2 chambres) de 1069 à 1281 p2 brut ainsi que 2 unités de 5 ½ (3 chambres incluant la mezzanine) de 1339 ou 1615 p2 brut incluant une terrasse sur le toit. Situé à proximité de Jean-Talon et du Métro St-Michel. Air climatisée murale incluse et stationnement extérieur disponible. Plancher de bois francs et céramique, choix de couleur pour les armoires en mélamine grains de bois (choix disponible selon l'avancement des travaux), douche et bain séparés. Quoi de mieux!
  11. Le premier pas vers la matérialisation du rêve d'un Petit Maghreb sur la rue Jean-Talon vient d'être franchi. Nacer Boudi, propriétaire d'Atlas Net, Youcef Handi, co propriétaire du restaurant Walima, et le conseiller publicitaire du Journal de St-Michel, Claude Boulet, ont enfin réglé les questions de paperasse afin de créer l'association de commerçants de cette artère. «Présentement, cette direction n'est que temporaire, en attendant la première assemblée générale. Nous trois, nous sommes impliqués pour piloter le projet jusqu'à l'élection officielle du premier conseil d'administration», explique Nacer Boudi, visiblement fier de voir qu'enfin le Petit Maghreb devient de plus en plus réalité. Lors de cette assemblée, dont la date est encore à déterminer, les marchands pourront se prononcer sur leur accord avec le projet d'association, de développement de l'artère, sur le nom «Petit Maghreb» et enfin élire le premier conseil d'administration de l'association. Claude Boulet et lui tiennent à insister sur le côté rassembleur du projet. Un projet qui aura d'heureuses répercussions sur ce tronçon de la rue Jean-Talon, compris entre les boulevards St-Michel et Pie-IX. «L'association jouera plusieurs rôles dont ceux de défendre les droits des marchands, de promouvoir le Petit Maghreb en lui donnant un aspect maghrébin avec la coopération de la ville, comme ils l'ont fait avec la Petit Italie ou Chinatown, poursuit Monsieur Boudi. L'association permettra de travailler ensemble afin de revitaliser et d'embellir la rue Jean-Talon et de faire du Petit Maghreb un pôle attractif ce qui fera augmenter l'achalandage chez tous les commerçants.» La création d'un quartier Petit Maghreb est, semble-t-il, une première en Amérique du Nord, ce qui fera de lui un endroit unique à visiter pour tous les Maghrébins nostalgiques de leur pays. Un endroit de référence pour chaque Maghrébin ou simple voyageur de passage à Montréal. «On doit pouvoir arriver à faire de l'endroit quelque chose de reconnu. Que quelqu'un qui prend un taxi de l'aéroport pourra dire au chauffeur "Petit Maghreb!" et qu'il sache exactement où aller», ajoute Nacer Boudi. Un Petit Maghreb qui contribuera à l'enrichissement de la culture de la Métropole et même du Québec dans sa diversité. Le développement de cette artère aura certes un effet bénéfique sur l'achalandage des commerces situés sur celle-ci. Au-delà de l'aspect commercial La création d'un Petit Maghreb n'est pas tout pour Nacer Boudi. Il espère que la Ville s'impliquera activement dans ce processus afin de développer cette artère, de la transformer physiquement mais aussi pour mettre au point, avec d'autres associations de cette communauté, un genre de semaine de festivités maghrébines qui pourraient se dérouler dans le parc François-Perrault tout juste à l'arrière de la rue Jean-Talon. «Pour présenter la culture, les coutumes, les traditions, la cuisine du Maghreb, parce que c'est ça les vrais accommodements… apprendre à connaître et à respecter les valeurs de l'autre», souligne-t-il. Marchands de ce tronçon de la rue Jean-Talon, compris entre St-Michel et Pie-IX, et maintenant mieux connu sous le nom de Petit Maghreb, vous êtes invités à vous joindre en grand nombre à l'association à naître pour faire ce rêve une réalité, un endroit unique à travers toute l'Amérique du Nord
  12. Le 3889 se trouve en plein quartier du Petit-Maghreb ou plutot juste au sur du quartier St-Michel. Il sera sur la rue Jean-Talon entre St-Michel et Pie-IX. C'est un quartier en développement qui a besoin d'un "push'' et d'une plus grande densité pour faire profiter les commerces qui sont principalement issue des communautés maghrebines. C'est l'idensité de ce petit coin de ville. Malheureusement ce petit projet ne semble pas très prometteur. Premièrement il n'est que de 3 étages et demi, ou 4 si l'on compte la terrasse. Sur Jean-Talon on aurait aimer un 6 étages, minimum, voir un 8 ou 10. Mais il faudra accepter que la ville (ou l'arrondissement) n'est pas intéressé à une vraie densification. Dommage. http://www.constructionbeau-vain.com/projet-condominiums-a-vendre-montreal-3889.php