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  1. some of you might have already seen this, but a friend posted this on facebook and thought it was funny: YOU KNOW YOUR FROM MONTREAL WHEN : • You pronounce it "Muntreal", not "Mahntreal". • You have ever said anything like "I have to stop at the guichet before we get to the dep." • Your only concern about jaywalking is getting a ticket. • You agree that Montréal drivers are crazy, but you're secretly proud of their nerves of steel. • The most exciting thing about the South Shore is that you can turn right on a red. • You know that the West Island is not a separate geographical formation. • You bring smoked meat from Schwartz's and bagels from St-Viateur if you're visiting anyone. • You refer to Tremblant as "up North." • You know how to pronounce Pie-IX. • You greet everyone, you meet with a two-cheek kiss. • You're not impressed with hardwood floors. • You can watch soft-core porn on broadcast TV, and this has been true for at least 25 years. • You were drinking café-au-lait before it was latte. • Shopper's Drug Mart is Pharmaprix and Staples is Bureau en gros, and PFK is finger lickin' good. • You really believe Just For Laughs is an international festival. For two weeks a year. • Everyone, – drivers, pedestrians, and cyclists – think they're immortal, and that you'll move first. • You're proud that Montréal is home of the Great Antonio... • You know that Rocket Richard had nothing to do with astrophysics. • You've seen Brother André's heart. • No matter how bilingual you are, you still don't understand "île aux tourtes." • You know the difference between the SQ, the SAQ, and the SAAQ. • You measure temperature and distance in metric, but weight and height in Imperial measure. • You show up at a party at 11 p.m. and no one else is there yet. • You know that Montréal is responsible for introducing to North America: bagels, souvlaki, smoked meat. • You don't drink pop or soda, you drink soft drinks. • You have graduated from high school and have a degree, but you've never been in grade 12. • There has to be at least 30 cm of snow on the ground in 24 hours to consider it too snowy to drive. • You remember where you were during the Ice Storm. • You used to be an Expos fan, but now all you really miss is Youppi. • You know that your city's reputation is for beautiful women. • You discuss potholes like most people discuss weather. • "The Futuristic City" is actually Habitat '67. • You find it amusing when people from outside Québec compliment you on how good your English is. • You have yet to understand a single announcement made on the Métro PA system. • You think of Old Montréal as nothing but a bunch of over-priced restaurants, old buildings. • You understand that La Fête Nationale is not a celebration of "Québec's birthday" • You don't find American comedians speaking "gibberish" French even remotely funny. • You don't find it weird that there's a strip club on every corner downtown. • You know the words to the national anthem in French. • You often switch from "heat" to "A/C" in the same day. • You use a down comforter in the summer. • Your parents drive at 120km/h through 13 feet of snow during a blizzard, without flinching. • You carry jumper cables in your car and your girlfriend knows how to use them. • You design your kid's Halloween costume to fit over a snowsuit. • Driving is better in the winter because the potholes are filled with snow. • You know all 4 seasons: almost winter, winter, still winter, and construction. • You don't understand anyone from Lac-St-Jean, but you can fake the accent.
  2. snow in old montreal is so beautiful. plus my first winter living downtown yay
  3. * Find this article at: * http://www.time.com/time/world/article/0,8599,1930822,00.html
  4. Is Montreal the real art capital of Canada? SARAH MILROY From Saturday's Globe and Mail May 30, 2008 at 11:07 PM EDT MONTREAL — Is Montreal the new Vancouver? I've heard the question floated the last few days following the opening of the Québec Triennial at the Musée d'art contemporain de Montréal last weekend. It's a major exhibition – 38 artists showing 135 works of art – and it presents a new generation of Quebec artists, emerging into view after a long period of relative seclusion and quiet growth. There are many, many discoveries to be made, particularly for gallerygoers who live outside of Quebec. The curators took risks. (The show was organized by MACM curators Paulette Gagnon, Mark Lanctôt, Josée Bélisle and Pierre Landry, now at the Musée National des Beaux-Arts du Québec.) They set out with no declared curatorial theme, which so often serves as a diversion from the brutal sheep-and-goats sorting that such a show should be all about. The exhibition's title, Nothing Is Lost, Nothing Is Created, Everything Is Transformed, was arrived at after the fact, borrowed from the writings of a Greek scientist and philosopher named Anaxagoras of Clazomenae (500-428 BC). It's a title that would suit many of the big roundup shows this year (for example, Unmonumental at The New Museum in New York, and the Whitney Biennial), having about it both the celebratory and the apocalyptic flavour of the moment. These days, the artist often seems to perform a kind of sampling role, picking through the churning deluge of information and imagery that makes up the contemporary visual environment. But where some of these larger international shows seem chaotic in sympathy with their subject (the current Whitney being the odious example), the Québec Triennial is tightly considered and expertly installed. A focus on the news Enlarge Image Among the big names are Michel de Broin, who won last year's Sobey Art Award and is a significant force on the Quebec scene. (Ellen Page Wilson) There were obvious big names missing from the lineup – such as Montrealers Pascal Grandmaison and Geneviève Cadieux or the Quebec City artist collective BGL, which has been showing up a lot in Toronto – and the curators may take heat for that on the home front. But instead of received ideas they have delivered us news. One of the most startling discoveries is the video work of 36-year-old Patrick Bernatchez. Here, he is showing two mesmerizing projection pieces, both set in the Fashion Plaza in the Mile End former garment district of Montreal, a part of the city currently being re-gentrified by the arts community. In I Feel Cold Today, we enter a 1960s-style office tower and ascend the elevators to the sound of a lush soundtrack (the artist's remix of fragments of classical music and film scores), arriving at a suite of empty offices that gradually fill with billowing snow. It's a mystical transformation. The cinematic precedent is the famous snow scene from Dr. Zhivago, where the accumulation of snow in the abandoned country house bespeaks the loss of a way of life, and the passage of time. Here, it is modernism that is mourned and, more particularly, the go-go optimism of Quebec in its Expo 67 moment. Bernatchez's other work, Chrysalide: Empereur, is without such obvious precedent, drifting in a realm of its own. All the camera shows us is a car parked in a grimy garage. In it sits a man in a Ronald McDonald clown costume, smoking a cigarette behind the wheel as water gradually fills the interior of his car. The sun roof is open (we see his party balloons escaping), so this man is not trapped, yet he makes no effort to escape as the water rises. This seems to be a suicide, yet he does not die. Breathing in water, is he returning to life in the womb, a place of deep privacy and seclusion? I found myself reminded of Bruce Nauman's famous videos of clowns in extremis (his dark and distinctive blend of comedy and cruelty), and the sense of violent threat in Matthew Barney's Cremaster Cycle. If these have inspired Bernatchez, he has wrung from these precedents a new comic/tragic resonance. One of the few big names in the show is David Altmejd, who also hangs out on the borderline between beauty and horror. His two giant standing figurative sculptures in this show continue his investigations of decay and regeneration. One, titled The Dentist, is a stylistic departure for the artist : a mammoth monolith in the shape of a standing man that is made entirely from faceted mirrors. This colossus houses a number of quail eggs in its sides, and its surface is shattered here and there with what look like bullet holes, some of which sprout animal teeth. Despite the evidently fragile material from which it is made, the sculpture embodies a kind of brutal force. This is the sort of material conundrum that Altmejd loves to explore. An inspired juxtaposition In one of the most effective installation decisions in the show, Altmejd's mirrored sculpture stands within hearing range of Gwenaël Bélanger's video projection featuring the sound of a shattering mirror. The camera spins in the artist's studio, the rotation recorded in myriad stills spliced together to create a stuttering visual effect. Every five minutes, a pane of mirrored glass shatters as it is dropped on the floor with a sound like church bells, the phenomenon captured in hundreds of frozen micro-moments cut together. Like the works of Alexandre Castonguay (not in the show) or the earlier, more overt digital composites of Nicholas Baier, Bélanger takes an artisan's approach to digital technology, showing off his handiwork in obvious ways, a different approach than the sleight of hand of Vancouver artists such as Jeff Wall or the younger Scott McFarland. Mirrors figure, as well, in the new work of Baier, another of the show's better-known figures. For this show he has installed a magisterial suite of his most recent scanned antique mirrors, surfaces that offer scars and imperfections from deep within their inky depths. But, unlike Baier, most of the artists here are little known. There's Valérie Blass, whose sculptures range from a fur-clad zigzag form that springs from the wall (she titled the piece Lightning Shaped Elongation of a Redhead) to a two-legged standing figure that looks like the Cowardly Lion in a pair of high-heeled hooves. (A sloth clings to its breast, regarding us with wide eyes, curiouser and curiouser.) This woman has developed her own completely distinct vision, each work embodying a precise material language. Likewise, the British-born artist Adrian Norvid, who is showing a giant cartoon drawing of the Hermit Hamlet Hotel, an alternative getaway for deadbeat longhairs with hillbilly affectations. (One slogan reads “Recluse. Footloose. Screw Loose. No Use.”) Norvid takes the eccentric posture of the outsider/slacker, throwing rocks into the mainstream from his lazy place on the riverbank. Painting comes on strong. Etienne Zack appears to tip his hat to Velazquez and other classical masters in Cut and Paste, a painting of a courtier slumped in a chair. In this Cubist-seeming likeness, he breaks the figure up into planes of form hinged together with masking tape (painted, not real). Zack takes as his subject the literal building up of form through paint. This is painting about painting. Michael Merrill engages in another form of homage with his Paintings about Art, depictions of his fellow artists' work in museums and galleries in Canada and abroad. (One downward-looking view of the stairwell at the DIA Foundation in New York is a compositional gem, executed in dazzling emerald greens.) These pictures document the watering holes and pilgrimage sites of the little tribe of peripatetic Canadian artists, curators, dealers and collectors. Like Manet's portraits of his contemporaries, they are images to inform a future history of art. Certainly there were things here that seemed weak by comparison. The artist collective Women with Kitchen Appliances felt like a seventies throwback. I could live without the karaoke saloon by Karen Tam, or Trish Middleton's detritus-strewn Factory for a Day. David Armstrong Six's wonderful little watercolours hold up better than his large installation work here. And Julie Doucet's collage works are always fun to look at, but they wear out fast. As well, I have never taken to the simulated theatrics of Carlos and Jason Sanchez, who are exhibiting a photo portrait of John Mark Karr (who claimed to have killed six-year-old JonBenet Ramsey) and another work showing a pair of soldiers on the battlefield (the maudlin title: The Misuse of Youth). And it was disappointing that Michel de Broin, who won last year's Sobey Art Award and is a significant force on the Quebec scene, missed the opportunity to make a new major piece for this show. But every exhibition of this sort has its hits and misses. Montreal's critical mass So, why is Montreal art so strong these days? First, you have to credit the strong art schools in Montreal and Quebec City. Looking at the CVs of these artists, one sees most of them are homegrown talents trained at Concordia University or the University of Quebec at Montreal. (Just a handful have gone on to hone their skills at places like Cal Arts or Columbia in the United States or Goldsmiths in London.) These programs, coupled with the viability of Quebec's artist-run-centre scene and the highly charged political push for cultural integrity over the past several decades – plus the critical funding for the museums to support it – have clearly given extra momentum to the province's artistic production. With all its vitality and freshness, the show leaves one with the unmistakable impression of Montreal's ascendancy. Quebec artists are emerging now knowing who they are, apparently not seeking validation from elsewhere to feel empowered. Let's note: Montreal is home to the only international biennial in Canada (organized by the Centre International d'art contemporain), something English Canada has never pulled off. And nowhere in Canada has a museum committed to a regular showcase of this sort for Canadian contemporary art. (Province of Ontario, you're getting your butt kicked here.) It's telling that the Musée d'art contemporain de Montréal is the first to take the lead with its new Triennial. Refusing wannabe status, and with its leading institutions honouring the home culture with discernment and passion, Montreal is suddenly looking like the sexiest thing around. Nothing Is Lost, Nothing Is Created, Everything Is Transformed continues at the Musée d'art contemporain de Montréal until Sept. 7 (514-847-6232 or http://www.macm.org).
  5. Beth Nauss: In Montreal on spring break, mom and daughter chill out In a blinding display of “what was she thinking?” brilliance, I went to Montreal for spring break. The first problem was that I went with my oldest daughter. I love my daughter. She is an excellent traveling companion. But no one with a body my age should ever try to keep up with someone who is more than a decade younger and actually runs for a hobby. The second problem was that it was in Canada. For anyone who hasn’t been there, Canada is the huge mass of ice between the United States and the North Pole. In addition to ice, it is occupied primarily by Canadians, many of whom speak fluent Canadian. For reasons that seemed perfectly logical at the time, my daughter and I decided spring break was the perfect time to go to there. After all, it would be spring. Spring is warm. Therefore, Montreal would be warm. I’m sure people in Montreal get a hearty laugh at that thought. This was the first time I’d ever traveled to Canada as a destination. I’d flown over it a few times, looking down at the snow and thinking it was probably pretty cold there in the winter. After I landed, I realized it’s pretty cold in the springtime, too. In fact, based on the 10 feet of snow still on the ground at the end of March, Canada is probably pretty cold most of the time. When we checked the forecast and learned what the actual weather would be, I told my daughter not to worry, the locals must have adapted by now. I was sure that because Montreal is a major metropolitan area and tourist destination, the attractions would be open year round and would be readily accessible, clear of snow and ice. I’m sure people in Montreal get a hearty laugh at that thought as well. What I didn’t know was that their way of adapting to the snow was packing it down and walking over it, possibly because they have no choice. After a certain point, clearing snow becomes futile because you have no more places to put it. The result is that the streets are clean and dry, while balconies, vacant lots, parks, playgrounds and parking lots are buried under large mounds of snow that, in many parts of the U.S., would support multiple ski resorts. [url=http://www.readingeagle.com/article.aspx?id=87135#][/url]Fortunately, Montreal has an excellent underground public transportation system called the “Metro” (Canadian for “excellent underground public transportation system”). We found that many of the snow-covered attractions were readily visible from a Metro station so we could at least take scenic photographs before retreating back underground into an area that was warm and dry. Unfortunately, we couldn’t live in the Metro, so occasionally we had to brave the elements. One of those times involved a trip up Mont Royal, the snow-covered mountain in the middle of Montreal. The pedestrian walkway up the mountain was (of course) covered with snow, ice and numerous hardy Canadians who were walking, running, skiing and biking their way to and from the top. One even drove by, oblivious to the wrong turn that took her off the pedestrian-free road a mile behind her. These hardy Canadians were probably fortified by the local dish called “Poutine,” a pile of french fries and cheese drowning in a lake of thick brown gravy. I felt that in the interest of Canada-U.S. relations, I should try some. When I did, I found that it would have been better if I hadn’t. We did, however, make it up Mont Royal without falling. If any Canadians are reading this, before you accuse me of exaggerating, let me say that I love Canada. We had a great time there. Montreal is a beautiful city even if it is always covered with snow. Let me also say that I know that sometimes Montreal has a warm season and, at least once a century, all the snow melts. And when that happens, I hope to return. Even if you’re still serving Poutine. http://www.readingeagle.com/article.aspx?id=87135
  6. http://www.montrealgazette.com/health/Montrealers+need+heated+sidewalks/4387020/story.html
  7. I.H.T. SPECIAL REPORT: SMART CITIES http://www.nytimes.com/2011/11/18/business/global/hip-cities-that-think-about-how-they-work.html?pagewanted=1&_r=1&sq=montreal,%20auckland,%20berlin&st=cse&scp=1 By CHRISTOPHER F. SCHUETZE Published: November 17, 2011 The story of young people, full of ambition, energy, skill and talent, moving to enticing cities that call to them like a siren’s song is as old as modern civilization. And in a world where national borders are easier to traverse, where more countries are joining the prosperous global middle class and where the cost of a one-way plane ticket is more affordable, young professionals probably have more cities to choose from than ever before. This survey is not based solely on quality of life, number of trees or the cost of a month’s rent. Instead, we examine some cities that aim to be both smart and well managed, yet have an undeniably hip vibe. Our pick of cities that are, in a phrase, both great and good: Montreal With its hearty French and North American mix, this city of 3.6 million has a real soul thanks to low living costs and long winter evenings. And it is no slouch when it comes to good food, hip culture, well-appointed museums and efficient transportation. Related With four major universities and plenty of bars, the nightlife in this bilingual city has a well-deserved reputation. Because the winters tend to be long and cold, the city possesses an extensive underground network connecting several downtown malls and a subterranean arts quarter. When spring finally does arrive, and snow is cleared from the many bike paths, the city puts out its 5,000 short-term-rental bicycles, known as Bixi. City-sponsored community gardens are sprouting around town, giving urbanites a chance to flex their green thumb. Montreal is an incredibly active town where festivals celebrating everything from jazz to Formula One dominate the city’s calendar during the summer. Thanks to Mount Royal, a large central park and cemetery that serves as cross-country, snowshoe and ice-skating terrain in the winter and becomes a verdant picnic ground and gathering spot in the summer, Montrealers never have to leave city limits.
  8. By Cat DiStasio Snow sports are wildly popular around the globe -- even in regions with no winter to speak of. No matter, because architects and engineers have joined forces to create ski and snowboard slopes in some of the most unlikely places. Whether indoors or out, artificial snow or pure natural pow-pow, these buildings with built-in slopes will blow your snow-loving mind. From the longest indoor ski slope on the planet to an eco-friendly year-round snow sports resort, this roundup has something for everyone. If you can't hold your breath 'til the next bluebird day rolls around, opt for one of these spots where it's primo shredding season with no white-out in the forecast. Rest of the pics here: http://www.engadget.com/2016/01/21/6-buildings-that-you-can-sled-ski-and-snowboard-on/#gallery=358601&slide=3774117
  9. Abolish Montreal's 'Little Kingdoms' Posted by: Michael Dudley 8 January 2008 - 1:00pm Owing to political fragmentation and 20 different mayors, the Canadian city of Montreal is becoming increasingly dysfunctional and must be simplified, writes Lysiane Gagnon. "How many mayors does a city with 1.8 million people need? In Montreal, no fewer than 20." "Mayor Gérald Tremblay chairs city council. Nineteen "smaller" mayors chair the conseils d'arrondissements; these municipal districts have become responsible for zoning, housing, parks, street maintenance and so on. The arrondissements often collide with the central administration, and some of the mayors, riding on their inflated status, behave like feudal lords." "Montreal [is] divided...into 'arrondissements' (some carved out of the main city, and others corresponding to the former suburban municipalities) [to which are] delegated massive powers. Montreal was stuck with 19 cities within the city." "More and more, Montrealers complain about the disintegration of services. They don't even know who to blame because there is no tangible political accountability." "The absurdity of the system...was especially obvious in the wake of two consecutive snowstorms that descended on the metropolitan area before Christmas. Since boroughs are responsible for snow removal, the clearing operations varied from one district to another." "In Côte-des-Neiges, the streets surrounding two hospitals were still clogged days after the snowfall, while the quiet residential streets of Rosemont were thoroughly clean. The worst was in Ville-Marie. Sherbrooke, Montreal's major east-west artery, was still lined with giant snowbanks when the second snowfall hit. On Ste-Catherine, Montreal's major commercial street, the Ville-Marie workers never managed to spray salt or sand on sidewalks covered with black ice. "It was the worst performance in memory," wrote Gazette city columnist Henry Aubin, who believes that snow clearance, like firefighting and policing, should be subject to a unified policy." "Actually, Montreal is ready for more: The city should be recentralized and its little kingdoms abolished." Source: Globe & Mail, Jan 07, 2008 http://www.planetizen.com/node/29179 Full Story: Down with Montreal's 19 kingdoms
  10. Tiré de Facebook pensez que vous êtes un Anglais de Montréal. (les seul anglais que j'aime bien ) You Know You're A Montrealer When? you have ever said anything like "I have to stop at the guichet before we get to the dep." your only concern about jaywalking is getting a ticket. you understand and frequently use terms like 'unilingual,' 'anglophone,' 'francophone,' and 'allophone.' you agree that Montreal drivers are crazy, but you're secretly proud of their nerves of steel. the most exciting thing about the South Shore is that you can turn right on a red. you know that the West Island is not a separate geographical formation. in moments of paranoia, you think that there's no red line on the Metro because red is a federalist colour. you have to bring smoked meat from Schwartz's and bagels from St-Viateur if you're visiting anyone west of Cornwall. you refer to Tremblant as "up North." you know how to pronounce Pie IX. you have an ancient auntie who still says "Saint Dennis." you believe to the depth of your very being that Toronto has no soul - but your high school reunion is held in Toronto because most of your classmates live there now. you greet everyone, from lifelong bosom friends to some one you met once a few years ago, with a two-cheek kiss. you know at least one person who works for the CBC, and at least one other person who used to work for Nortel. you know what a four-and-a-half is. you're not impressed with hardwood floors. you've been hearing Celine Dion jokes longer than anyone else. you can watch soft-core porn on broadcast TV, and this has been true for at least 25 years. you cringe when Bob Cole pronounces French hockey player names. you get Bowser & Blue. you were drinking cafe-au-lait before it was latte. Shopper's Drug Mart is Pharmaprix and Staples is Bureau en Gros, and PFK is finger lickin' good. you really believe Just For Laughs is an international festival. for two weeks a year, you are a jazz afficianado. you need to be reminded by prominent signage that you should wait for the green light. everyone on the street - drivers, pedestrians, and cyclists - think they're immortal, and that you'll move first. you're proud that Montreal is the home of Pierre Trudeau, Mordechai Richler, William Shatner, Leonard Cohen and the Great Antonio... and, you consider Donald Sutherland (and by default, Keifer), Guy Lafleur, Charlie Biddle, and Roch Carrier Montrealers, too. you know that Rocket Richard had nothing to do with astrophysics. you know the apocryphal story of the fat lady at Eaton's. you miss apostrophes. you've seen Brother Andre's heart. no matter how bilingual you are, you still don't understand "ile aux tourtes." you know the difference between the SQ, the SAQ, and the SAAQ. you measure temperature and distance in metric, but weight and height in Imperial measure. you show up at a party at 11 p.m. and no one else is there yet. April Wine once played your high school (alternatively, Sass Jordon or Gowan). you know that Montreal is responsible for introducing the following to North America: bagels, souvlaki, smoked meat and Supertramp. Also, Chris de Burgh. you don't drink pop or soda, you drink soft drinks. you have graduated from high school and have a degree, but you've never been in grade 12. the margarine in your fridge is the same colour as lard. every once in a while, you wonder whatever happened to Luba. you never thought that Corey Hart was cool, but you know someone whose cousin or something dated him. there has to be at least 30 cm of snow on the ground in less than 24 hours for you to consider it too snowy to drive. you remember where you were during the Ice Storm. you used to be an Expos fan, but now all you really miss is Youppi. you know that your city's reputation for beautiful women is based on centuries-old couplings between French soldiers and royally-commissioned whores (aka Les Filles du Roi). you don't understand anyone from Lac-St-Jean, but you can fake the accent. you've been to the Tam Tams, and know they have nothing to do with wee Scottish hats. you discuss potholes like most people discuss weather. You encounter bilingual homeless people. While watching an American made-for-TV movie, you realize that "Vienna" is actually Old Montreal, that "New York" is actually downtown and that the "The Futuristic City" is actually Habitat '67. You find it amusing when people from outside Quebec compliment you on how good your English is. You have yet to understand a single announcement made on the Metro PA system, no matter what the language. You think of Old Montreal as nothing but a bunch of over-priced restaurants, old buildings and badly paved streets. You understand that La Fete Nationale is not a celebration of "Quebec's birthday". You don't find American comedians speaking "gibberish" French even remotely funny. You don't find it weird that there's a strip club on every corner downtown. you like your pizza all-dressed How about Montrealers' resistance to winter boots? No matter how much snow there is, you'll still find people walking around in running shoes.(Mara Inniss) You find it amusing when people from outside Quebec compliment you on how good your English is. ( Laura Weinstein) esti calisse de tabarnaque! Never mind swearing in french; swearing in quebecer is like wiping your ass with silk! (Audrey March) You can order a cheeseburger in three different languages... and never ask "hey, where's the ketchup?" (Michael Langlais) You have no patience for nonsense about NY bagels being world-famous except that Montreal bagels are better and more world-famous. You often switch from "heat" to "A/C" in the same day. Your parents drive at 120km/h through 13 feet of snow during a blizzard, without flinching. You carry jumper cables in your car and your girlfriend knows how to use them. Driving is better in the winter because the potholes are filled with snow. You know all 4 seasons: almost winter, winter, still winter, and construction. ) You know what a "dillalo burger" is. You know difference between smoked meat and Schwartz's. You care more about which habs player isn't playing well than the current world events. You know what a Depaneur is. When 1/4 mil + people know a single homeless guy. you go into a grocery store in another province and don't understand why they don't have alcohol. when someone asked for directions to get to the metro/train in downtown, we all say "If you see the super sex sign, you've gone too far." (Helene Legault) You expect there to be a dollarama walking distance from anywhere....and if there isn't there should be. when everyone in the room's first language is english but you still watch the habs on RDS on saturday nights 'cause you can't stand the CBC announcers When you think Georges-Vanier is just an optical illusion 'cause you've never seen anyone get on or off You know you're a montrealer when your parents still refer to Dorchester and you know which street they're referring to You say Métro instead of subway. You know ur a montrealer when you smell weed as often as cigarettes. You know ur a montrealer when you can walk down ste - catherine while smoking a joint You know ur a montrealer when a cop politely asks you to put out your joint. you remember that Belmont Park was WAY better than Laronde. when at the first sign of +9 celcius, your ass is outside on any terrasse having sangria (Alli Cat) you know you're a montrealer when you're not surprised to see 100s of cars honking with portuguese, italian, etc. flags, because you know they just won a football game. (Carolyn Hance) When you're constantly defending Canada to Quebecers, and Quebec to the rest of your Canadian friends. (Mark Ordonselli) When it's -15 with 30cm on the ground and you still think " hmm, maybe I'll take my bike" (Ken Roy) when you remember that Pierrette's was THE depanneur -and there was no such thing as Couche Tard (Lori McKenna) No matter what concert it is you always end up cheering "Ole Ole Ole Ole" to get the band back on stage for an encore. As if you were at a soccer game. when, in winter, you can go to work, have a bite, go shopping, see a movie and come back home without ever seeing the daylight. When you think that Mont-Royal is actually a mountain. (Brittany France) when you find it normal that "Guy" exit off the 720 doesn't take you to "Guy" street... and neither does the "Atwater" exit!! (Audrey Gutierrez) When the surname of President Vladimir Putin sounds funny however you pronounce it. (Ka Lun Sze) You were more upset for Youppi possibly being put into retirement than you were for the Expos' departure (although that was lethal too). You try to start the "ole" chant even when Montreal teams aren't involved.
  11. Montreal snowplow driver suspended for burying car Vehicle's owner had been in argument over parking space Last Updated: Monday, February 2, 2009 | 11:29 AM ET CBC News A Montreal couple found their car covered with snow after an argument with a plow driver over the weekend near McGill University.A Montreal couple found their car covered with snow after an argument with a plow driver over the weekend near McGill University. (Kristy Rich/CBC) A Montreal snowplow driver has been suspended for dumping a whopping pile of snow onto a car after a dispute over a parking space. Now the couple who found their car looking more like an igloo than a sedan want an apology from the driver. "I think [he] should be sorry for what he did. He caused a lot of trouble for a lot of people," Roy Dudley, the owner of the car, told CBC News. On Friday night, Dudley parked his Volkswagen Jetta on Lorne Crescent near his home east of McGill University. A private snow-removal crew contracted by the city was clearing snow off one side of the street, so Dudley chose a spot on the other side. 'It was amazing how much snow there was on it. Obviously, it was deliberately done.' —Car owner Roy Dudley Dudley said one of the drivers ordered him to move his car because it could get in the way of their efforts to clear the narrow roadway. However, Dudley refused, saying there were no signs prohibiting him from parking there. The plow driver's boss arrived on the scene and suggested a truce: He offered to clear out a space for Dudley's car on a street nearby. Satisfied, Dudley moved his car to the new space and returned home. But he awoke Saturday to a frosty surprise. The entire street was clear except for two mountains of hard-packed, dirty snow covering his car. "It was amazing how much snow there was on it. Obviously, it was deliberately done," said Dudley. Roy Dudley found his car snowed-in on Lorne Crescent in Montreal.Roy Dudley found his car snowed-in on Lorne Crescent in Montreal. (Kristy Rich/CBC) His wife, Margaret Thompson, was dumbfounded. She said it would have been impossible for the couple to shovel out their car because the snow was so hard and compact. "Why would they do that?" she asked. "I realize their job is stressful and everyone is on their case about clearing the snow. But … where else are we supposed to park? Parking down here is really hard in the winter." City orders contractor to dislodge car The couple called police and the city, and by Saturday evening a city supervisor arrived on the scene. The supervisor ordered the contractor to clear the snow off the car. The crew returned Sunday and used a front-end loader and a tow truck to free the car from its snowy tomb. 'That is a rare problem, but it could happen. We have a very large operation.'—Yves Girard, Montreal's director of snow removal "I was happy that in front of my eyes, less than 24 hours later, the problem was being taken care of," said Dudley. Montreal's director of snow removal, Yves Girard, described the incident as an isolated one. "That is a rare problem, but it could happen. We have a very large operation," said Girard. "We have 3,000 employees, many pieces of equipment working on sidewalks and streets, and sometimes there are complaints because people don't want to move their cars." Entreprise Michaudville, a private snow-removal company, employed the driver. Gilles Gauthier, the driver's supervisor, told CBC News he'd never before seen a situation like this involving one of his employees. He said the company is taking responsibility for the incident and has suspended the driver for the rest of the season. Montreal has received near-record levels of snowfall this winter. Click on the link for pictures: http://www.cbc.ca/canada/montreal/story/2009/02/02/mtl-plowrage-0202.html