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Found 18 results

  1. This is amazing: I'd love to see something similar for Canada. http://demographics.coopercenter.org/DotMap/index.html Zoom-in of NYC & LI Area:
  2. I do research at the UQAM science campus and sometimes I see candy wrappers, party-invitation fliers, or pieces of paper on the floor in the halls inside the buildings. This is explained by the large amount of students walking those halls every day, and by the presence of vending machines. This doesn't bother me a lot and I normally just pick them up and put them in the garbage. As you probably know, however, they are extremely dangerous, and the probability of someone slipping is much higher than you would imagine (the chance of someone actually falling is probably not very high but that's another subject, since it has already became a safety issue). A few days ago I saw a sign by the door of an office that read "SAFETY FIRST: NO LITTERING IN THIS AREA." The sign is still there. I found it interesting for various reasons: 1) It was in English (besides the occasional ironic science-related comic strip on the wall by the doors of some professors, I never see anything in English at UQAM). 2) It tackled littering in a complete different manner than the usual "it looks bad." 3) It is the first time I see a sign tackling littering in Montreal, and I think Quebec in general, and it was not official in any way! It was not even in French! (wait, now that I remember there are some signs that look like they haven't been changed since the 60s behind some alleys, and there is those posters that didn't seem to have worked). 4) This sign seemed to have worked. Now I don't know about (4) because it might be that the person who put up the sign had been picking up candy wrappers out of safety concern. But it would have definitely worked for me (if I were among the ones who litter), since the consequence on my actions suddenly goes from annoying some people to possibly killing a person. Anyway I just realized I don't really have a conclusion for this post so I'm gonna try to wrap it up... A while ago I saw a TED lecture by an advertising man on changing the approach to give new value to existing products. I wonder if something similar could be done regarding littering. Would there be less littering if people saw it by default as a safety issue? It seems to me like changing the approach would work. Well I don't think there is any approach here anyway. Most people in Montreal would see me as a redneck for even worrying about littering.
  3. Close Up on [FURNI] VBS.tv did a small video interview on Mike Giles of Furni. He does a lot of wood work. I had a chance to work at Furni for a day and use the laser cutter. Seeing he is good friends with the person I am doing my internship with. Blog So if your in the mood, buy one of their clocks for yourself or a present for someone Please check him out. INSIDER INFO: He is also working on Hi-Fi headphones. It is a concept form at the moment. I will tell you more or post pictures when I see the finish product. All I can say, the idea will be similar to GRADO's GS1000i but far less expensive.
  4. jesseps

    Rogers Vision

    Anyone try it out? Rant: I just wish we could sort of get a decent rate for surfing the net with our phone. One thing I noticed that the Vision (3G) is on the same network at the wireless internet (pc cards) or so I think. 1GB for $65. Something similar for consumers and not business oriented people, probably cost over $500. Plus 1GB surfing on the phone seems reasonable, it is like 30 MB a day for about $2.
  5. The Canadian government is changing the rules on foreign ownership of airlines in Canada. They can now own up to 49% of an airline up from 25%. So it is a possibility that Porter will be bought. The other new small discount players could also be bought and give more access to Canadians. Also I saw a few days ago that Southwest Airlines is looking to fly into Canada in the future. Time will tell how things turn out. It would be nice to have a carrier similar to Ryanair operate within Canada.
  6. For a while now I have been thinking about how Canada would be like, if we actually had a decent size population. I found an article from the Globe and Mail from a few years ago, saying we should really consider increasing the number of immigrants coming to this country. How do we get 1.9 million new people to move to Canada and live here, each and every year? Yes, the current major cities like Toronto and Montreal will continue to grow, but we should find ways to get other cities to grow also. If we did manage to get to 100,000,000 people living in Canada by 2050, we would have a density of 10 people per sq.km. That would be almost similar to present day Russia (excl. the annexation of Crimea). The US has 35 people per sq.km. With that we would see Canada explode to well over 300 million people. Yes it would be a lot of more mouths to feed. Plus we would need a rapid expansion in new urban centers across the provinces and especially the territories. We would also need to develop/revitalize current industries and create new industries. I know the energy (petrol) and mining sectors are in the toilet, but if we managed to increase the population, we would probably bring those industries back to life. We may be able to finally fly Montreal to Vancouver or within this country for cheaper or drive through the Prairies and be bored out of our minds or even driving all the way to Iqaluit and not worry about the gas tank, seeing there may be a station close by and not 1000's of km away. Also we can finally see many of the national parks and provincial/territorial parks, that are inaccessible and costs 10s of thousands of to visit. The reason I bring up the territories, they are grossly under populated. If there are more people there and more towns/cities connecting them to the south, the cost of living there will decrease. Plus by 2050-2100, more people will be moving north because of climate change. I found one agency formulate by 2050, we would see Canada's population grow to well under 50 million, we would be one of the wealthiest per capita, but our GDP would be lower. If we could increase the population to 100 million and also find a way to still have a similar GDP per capita as the one forecast for 2050 with 50 million, we would be the 4th wealthiest instead of the 17th. It is a long shot and I know Canada has a lot to do before that time, but we should really think about the future of this country.
  7. Shows you where the money is going these days. Great looking skyscraper! Article on FP: http://business.financialpost.com/2013/07/04/telus-to-build-400-million-tower-in-calgarys-downtown/?__lsa=e9e9-144b
  8. CTV.ca News Staff Environment Canada confirms that a funnel cloud formed in Montreal's east end Wednesday afternoon, creating a rare tornado-like waterspout. Images of the event showed what appeared to be a twisting pillar of water rising out of the St. Lawrence River. Montreal was expected to be pounded by rain throughout the day. Environment Canada warned of winds reaching up to 90 kilometres per hour, and hail two centimetres in diametre. But despite those conditions, waterspouts are more commonly found in tropical weather. "These systems are usually formed in places like the Florida Keys because the temperatures are warmer and the water temperatures are also warm," said Martin Belanger, a meteorologist with MeteoMedia. "This one formed in Montreal, which is very rare." He added that funnel clouds which trigger waterspouts are basically a "tornado over the water," and have similar characteristics. "It looks kind of like a tornado. It's similar," he told CTV Montreal. "It has the same winds turning counterclockwise, and the wind speeds are roughly around 60 to 120 kilometres per hour. This time it was formed over water, which is why it's called a waterspout." There were no reports of damage from the waterspout.
  9. I haven't found any news about it yet but there is a weird smell all around Downtown (well at least Place des Arts, lower Main and Concordia). The smell resembles that of dead animals (trust me, I know), but no dead animal could smell that far, so it's probably industrial. Any guesses? Same thing appears to have happened in Toronto a couple of weeks ago: http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showthread.php?t=1368017 A similar (yet less disgusting) mystery was solved in New York in 2009 by mapping 311 calls: http://www.nytimes.com/2009/02/06/nyregion/06smell.html Montreal is a much less dense city though and most people here don't call 311 for these things.
  10. Where do you locate on the Political Compass? After taking the Test, if you can either post the coordinates and/or the graph with the dot on it. Economic Left/Right: 7.00 Social Libertarian/Authoritarian: 4.62 I'm fairly right economically, however on social issues I tend to be more centrist (however in the authoritarian quadrant still). In general, I'm ideologically similar to Harper and McCain. Bush if a little further right than I am and more authoritarian. Obama is further left and a little less authoritarian. Take the test here: http://www.politicalcompass.org/
  11. It isn't really my "vision". I was speaking to my mother this morning and she said the canal is never used. She would love to see people using it to kayak or turn it into another larger version of what they are doing to one of the Quai's in Old Montreal. It would be more than 6 km of fun during the summer and in the winter, it could be used to skate on (similar to the Rideau Canal in Ottawa).
  12. Has anyone here had any experience with NYC nightlife? I've been to some killer house parties on long island, but aside from a bar near Times Square, i never had time to sample the nightlife. In a few weeks, my gf and I are going, and we want a different venue every night Also, a rooftop terrasse would be killer. Are there any in NYC, similar to Terrasse Magnétic, but on a 70-storey building instead of 20 storeys? What do you guys recommend!
  13. I was just wondering why there aren't any architecture TV networks? There seems to be a lot of people interested in the topic. Lots of sites devoted to architecture and forums, but no TV networks. There are TV networks that specialize in law, some in food, lots in sports/fitness, some in health, but none really in architecture. I know there are sites online that have architecture videos, and some sites that just specialize in videos. What I mean is an actual TV network similar to CNN, CNBC, ESPN, TLC,etc... Anyone know why? I'd love to see one. What are peoples thoughts?
  14. This map roughly shows each of the states in the US and the country to which they have a similar GDP.
  15. There really is a 'nous,' and it includes us The Gazette Published: Saturday, July 12 Summer is a much-longed-for season in Quebec, but one that is rarely productive from the point of view of fraternal feeling. By the time we get past St. Jean Baptiste day and July 1, whatever communal spirit the hockey playoffs have generated between francophones and anglophones has become a little frayed. Competitive parade-going is not an exercise calculated to bind a society closer together. This year had additional challenges to solidarity, with the tensions aroused by the Bouchard-Taylor Commission report and that stylized politicians' re-enactment of the Battle of the Plains of Abraham over the federal role in the 400th anniversary of the founding of Quebec City. So it was a remarkable pleasure to learn, this week, that the linguistic, cultural and social divergences that seem to flare up so often are, according to academic researchers, basically insignificant. A new study has found that there are very few important differences in attitudes between francophones and anglophones in Quebec. Anglos here are far more like francophones than we are like anglophones in the rest of Canada or in the United States. Writing in the U.S. Journal of Social Psychology, researchers from Bishop's University conclude that Quebecers, no matter what their mother tongue, show comparable open mindedness and emotional stability and are equally productive on the job, careful, attentive and agreeable. A couple of stereotypes do remain true to some degree, the psychologists said of their sample of 50 francophones and 50 anglophones: anglophones are slightly more conservative. But centuries of living together have not only made us similar, but have also given us something of a distinct personality. That's a real "us," all of us, francophone and anglophone alike. The study authors say there are three distinct personality/culture areas in North America: Quebec; the U.S. South; the rest of Canada and the U.S. combined. In Quebec, we have opted for a system of social solidarity. Elsewhere, the preference is for a more individualistic, free-market approach to building a society. Quebec anglophones are not different from their francophone compatriots in that regard. The researchers think that because we share the same physical place and same lifestyle, we have come to share similar attitudes in many matters. This is good news, if only we could hear it. It means the weary identity politics which some use in an effort to divide us have little firm foundation. We can all get along.
  16. I was wandering around Old Montreal / Griffintown last night. I noticed that only a few buildings actually have exterior lighting which is a shame. There are three buildings that actually caught my eye and I do wish that many more buildings in that area, in the next few years follow suit; Hotel St James, Canada's Custom House and Grand Trunk Railways. I do like that a handful of the buildings, are being revitalized (having their exteriors cleaned). Also seeing that Place D'Youville parking lot does not exist anymore, what would be nice if the city can manage to turn it into a space similar to Square Saint Louis with a water fountain in the middle. One thing I would like for the city to do, but they won't is rip up all the streets with asphalt and put stones back in, so Old Montreal as a whole have the old world feeling. Also use Edison bulbs in the lamp posts, I know they aren't eco-friendly but the streets would have an interesting look at night. There is also a few parking lots, west of McGill that I do wish that would be turned into green space and have high rises put in, but that would happen for a long time. Also while wandering last night, there was one street that I managed to go down, seeing all the buildings had similar architecture it felt like I was actually back in Paris which was a beautiful thing. If I do manage to go back to Old Montreal tonight, I will for sure take a picture of the street and post it here. I guess the whole area while change even more, when the Bonaventure is finally ground level.
  17. A facelift for St. Jacques? Tue, 2008-09-02 16:04. Shuyee Lee St. Jacques Street in NDG is known mainly for car dealerships, auto repair shops, seedy motels, vacant lots and empty storefronts. But the borough wants to give it a facelift and attract more residents and stores. It's proposing a bylaw that would bar new body shops, gas stations and other industrial business from opening up and rezone the area as mostly residential with room for restaurants, boutiques, grocery stores and similar "user-friendly" businesses. They're focussing on the stretch between Madison and Decarie. The existing industrial businesses would be allowed to stay. A public consultation is being held tonight at 6pm at 5151 Côte-Sainte-Catherine.
  18. The most expensive tunnel in the world Jul 29th 2012, 17:28 by N.B. | WASHINGTON, D.C. EARLIER this month, Amtrak, America's government-owned passenger rail corporation, released a plan outlining how it's going to spend $151 billion it doesn't currently have (and has no prospect of receiving anytime soon) to bring true high-speed trains to America's crucial Boston-New York-Washington rail axis. Gulliver has already explained why Amtrak's project is ambitious, expensive, and unlikely. But the more you delve into the details of the plans, the sillier they appear. Take, for example, Amtrak's proposal to bore a 10-mile rail tunnel underneath Philadelphia. As Steve Stofka, a transport blogger, explains, this proposal would require the most expensive type of tunnel imaginable—"It is freaking expensive to bore a ten-mile-long tunnel through an alluvial floodplain under a highly urbanised area—and to maintain it, since it will reside below the water table," Mr Stofka writes. At $10 billion, he notes that the project would be about three times as expensive per mile as the Gotthard Base Tunnel under the Swiss Alps. And all this is for marginal improvements in speed and access. The tracks around and through Philadelphia aren't, generally, big obstacles to high-speed rail—the tunnels in and around Baltimore, Maryland are. It would be much cheaper to replace Baltimore's terrible tunnels than to build a fancy new one under Philadelphia. The Philadelphia tunnel, unfortunately, isn't even the worst part of Amtrak's plan. That honour goes to a $7 billion renovation of Washington's Union Station (pictured), which Slate's Matthew Yglesias rightly calls "insane". Amtrak's cost estimate is many times higher than for similar projects in Europe. And as Mr Yglesias notes, it seems that Amtrak doesn't have its priorities straight: [F]rom the look of Amtrak's proposal in addition to the high unit costs problem, there seems to be an awful lot of emphasis on doing stuff that has no really clear operational benefits. For example, they don't like the fact that right now Union Station's existing platforms have unsightly and inconvenient columns in the middle of them. To get rid of the columns, they need to scrap the 2,000-space parking deck that they're supporting. Then they want to replace the parking deck with a 5,000-space four-level underground garage. That's an awful lot of money to spend on something that has minimal operational value from the standpoint of actually operating a railroad. There's no doubt that America's big east-coast cities could benefit from access to true high-speed rail. But before it gets the funding necessary to make that happen, Amtrak should put forth a credible, smart proposal that puts the needs of passengers and the public first. I have taken Amtrak trains out of Union Station several hundred times. I've never given more than a moment's thought to the "unsightly and inconvenient" columns on the platforms, but I have noticed how trains crawl through the tunnels in Baltimore and move much more slowly, overall, than similar trains in Europe. Renovating Union Station and replacing its parking garage isn't likely to make Amtrak's trains go any faster. Amtrak needs to get a handle on which kind of projects are worth billions of taxpayer dollars—and which aren't. http://www.economist.com/blogs/gulliver/2012/07/rail-renovations