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Found 6 results

  1. http://www.newcitiesfoundation.org/fr-evenements-new-cities-summit/ http://www.newcitiesfoundation.org/new-cities-summit/ New Cities Foundation NEW CITIES SUMMIT The New Cities Summit, our flagship event, is the leading global event on urban innovation. The Summit brings together the top entrepreneurs, innovators, change-makers, CEOs, policy makers, investors and thinkers in this space. Our Next New Cities Summit New Cities Summit Montréal 2016 The Age of Urban Tech http://www.newcitiessummit2016.org Our Past New Cities Summits New Cities Summit Jakarta 2015 Seizing the Urban Moment: Cities at the Heart of Growth and Development http://www.newcitiessummit2015.org Read E-Book Dallas - New Cities Summit 2014 New Cities Summit Dallas 2014 Re-Imagining Cities: Transforming the 21st Century Metropolis http://www.newcitiessummit2014.org Read E-Book São Paulo - New Cities Summit 2013 New Cities Summit São Paulo 2013 The Human City http://www.newcitiessummit2013.org Read E-Book Paris - New Cities Summit 2012 New Cities Summit Paris 2012 Thinking Ahead, Building Together http://www.newcitiessummit2012.org Read E-Book New Cities Foundation Shaping a better urban future Find out more : Our Mission Blog Members Contact Follow Us Facebook Twitter LinkedIn YouTube Sign up to our Newsletter Subscribe © 2016 New Cities Foundation | Credits | Powered by WordPress Sent from my SM-T330NU using Tapatalk
  2. Un bureau du Québec à Sao Paulo Monique Gagnon-Tremblay (archives) Une délégation de 30 personnes composée de représentants des milieux universitaires et des affaires québécois termine lundi une mission au Brésil, premier partenaire commercial du Québec en Amérique du Sud. La ministre des Relations internationales, Monique Gagnon-Tremblay, a profité de cette visite pour annoncer l'ouverture prochaine d'un bureau du Québec à Sao Paulo. En entrevue au Réseau de l'information, elle a affirmé que la mission avait dépassé ses objectifs. « J'ai découvert un pays non pas émergent, mais un pays qui a émergé », a-t-elle dit, soulignant la curiosité des Brésiliens à l'égard du Québec. Des rencontres d'information sur le Québec tenues à Sao Paulo et à Brasilia ont d'ailleurs attiré quelque 500 et 300 personnes, respectivement. Le ministère de l'Immigration et des Communautés culturelles a aussi profité de la mission pour signer une entente de francisation pour les candidats brésiliens à l'immigration avec le Service national d'apprentissage du commerce. La Conférence des recteurs et principaux des universités du Québec (CREPUQ), Cégep international, l'Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM), l'Université Concordia et le Collège François-Xavier-Garneau représentaient le volet éducatif de la mission. Onze entreprises de recherche et d'innovation, des affaires et de l'économie sociale faisaient partie du volet économique. La communauté d'affaires souhaitait attirer des entreprises brésiliennes en vue du Forum des Amériques d'octobre prochain, à Saint-Hyacinthe. L'objectif de participation de l'Amérique latine à cette rencontre est de 70 entreprises. Les exportations québécoises vers le Brésil ont atteint une valeur de 364 millions de dollars en 2005, en hausse de 52 % par rapport à l'année précédente. Le Brésil compte quelque 190 millions d'habitants.
  3. Doing business in Brazil Rio or São Paulo? For the first time in decades, Brazil’s Marvellous City looks attractive for business Sep 3rd 2011 | RIO DE JANEIRO AND SÃO PAULO | from the print edition LAST year Paulo Rezende, a Brazilian private-equity investor, and two partners decided to set up a fund investing in suppliers to oil and gas companies. Although this industry is centred on Rio de Janeiro, Brazil’s second-largest city, with its huge offshore oilfields—and fabulous beaches, dramatic scenery and outdoor lifestyle—they instead established the Brasil Oil and Gas Fund 430km (270 miles) away, in São Paulo’s concrete sprawl. Even though it means flying to Rio once or twice a week, Mr Rezende, like many other businesspeople, decided that São Paulo’s economic heft outweighed Rio’s charms. But the choice is harder than it used to be. For many years, São Paulo has been the place for multinationals to open a Brazil office. It may be less glamorous than Rio, as the two cities’ nicknames suggest: Rio is Cidade Maravilhosa(the Marvellous City); São Paulo is Cidade da Garoa (the City of Drizzle). But as Mr Rezende sadly concluded: “São Paulo is the financial centre, and that’s where the money is.” Edilson Camara of Egon Zehnder International, an executive-search firm, does 12 searches in São Paulo for each one in Rio. The biggest mistake, he reckons, is for firms to let future expatriates visit Rio at all. “They are seduced by the scenery and lifestyle, and it’s a move they can sell to their families. But many have ended up moving their office to São Paulo a couple of years later, with all the upheaval that entails.” From a hamlet founded by Jesuit missionaries in 1554, São Paulo grew on coffee in the 19th century, industry in the first half of the 20th—and then on the misfortunes of Rio, once Brazil’s capital and its richest, biggest city. The federal government abandoned Rio for the newly built Brasília in 1960, starting a half-century of decline. Misgoverned by politicians and fought over by drug gangs and corrupt police, Rio became dangerous, even by Brazilian standards. The exodus gained pace as businesses and the rich fled, mostly for São Paulo. Now, though, there are signs that the cost-benefit calculation is shifting. São Paulo’s economy has done well in Brazil’s recent boom years and it is still much bigger, but Rio’s is growing faster, boosted by oil discoveries and winning its bid to host the 2016 Olympics (see table). Last year Rio received $7.3 billion in foreign direct investment—seven times more than the year before, and more than twice as much as São Paulo. Prime office rents in Rio are now higher than anywhere else in the Americas, north or south, according to Cushman and Wakefield, a property consultancy. Community-policing projects are taming its infamous favelas, or shantytowns: its murder rate, though still very high at 26 per 100,000 people per year (2.5 times São Paulo’s), is at last falling. Brazil’s soaring real is pricing expats paid in foreign currencies out of São Paulo’s classy restaurants and shopping malls; Rio’s recipe of sun, sea and samba is still free. Even Hollywood seems to be on Rio’s side: an eponymous animation, with its lush depictions of rainforest and carnival, is one of the year’s highest-grossing films. Rio’s mayor, Eduardo Paes, has big plans for capitalising on the city’s magic moment. He has set up a business-development agency, Rio Negócios, to market the city, help businesspeople find investment opportunities, and advise on paperwork and tax breaks. It concentrates on sectors where it reckons Rio has an edge: tourism, energy, infrastructure and creative industries such as fashion and film. “A couple of years ago, foreign businessmen would come to Rio and ask what we had to offer,” says Mr Paes. “We had no answer. Now we roll out the red carpet.” The political balance between the two cities has changed too. In the 1990s São Paulo was more influential and better run: it is the stronghold of the Party of Brazilian Social Democracy (PSDB), the national party of government from 1995 to 2002. Now the PSDB is in its third term of opposition in Brasília, and though it still governs São Paulo state, it is weakened by internal feuds. In Rio, by contrast, the political stars are aligned. The state governor, Sérgio Cabral, campaigned tirelessly for the current president, Dilma Rousseff—and received his reward when police actions in an unruly favela late last year were backed up by federal forces. São Paulo’s socioeconomic segregation, long part of its appeal to expats, is starting to look like less of an advantage. Most of its nicer bits are clustered together, allowing rich paulistanos to ignore the vast favelas on the periphery. In Rio, selective blindness is harder with favelasperched on hilltops overlooking all the best neighbourhoods. But proximity seems to be teaching well-off cariocas that abandonment is no solution for poverty and violence. Community policing and urban-renewal schemes are bringing safety and public services. Chapéu Mangueira and Babilônia, twin favelas a 20-minute uphill scramble from Copacabana beach, are being rebuilt, with a clinic, nursery and a 24-hour police presence. The price of nearby apartments has soared. Other slums are also getting similar make-overs. Rio’s Olympic preparations include extending its metro and building lots of dedicated bus lanes, including one linking the international airport to the city centre. By 2016, predicts City Hall, half of all journeys in the city will be by high-quality public transport, up from 16% today. São Paulo’s metro extensions are years behind schedule, and the city is grinding towards gridlock. Its plans to link the city centre to its main international airport (recently voted Latin America’s most-hated by business travellers) rely on a grandiose federal high-speed train project, bidding for which was recently postponed for the third time. Rio is still unpredictably dangerous, and decades of poor infrastructure maintenance have left their mark. Its mobile-phone and electricity networks are outage-prone; the língua negra(“black tongue”, a sudden overflow of water and sewage) is a staple of the rainy season; exploding manholes, caused by subterranean gas leaks, are a hazard all year round. All in all, still not an easy choice for a multinational—but it is no longer foolish to let prospective expats fly down to Rio to take a look. http://www.economist.com/node/21528267
  4. Dans le but de mettre en place des mesures politiques pour contrer la crise mondiale, les pays du G20 sont réunis à Sao Paulo pour un sommet de deux jours. Pour en lire plus...
  5. Ce montant servira à agrandir et à moderniser son usine de Sao José dos Campos, dans l'État de Sao Paulo. Pour en lire plus...
  6. Top Fashion Cities of 2008 Named in Annual Survey July 14, 2008 The Top Fashion Cities of 2008 have been named by the Global Language Monitor (http://www.LanguageMonitor.com) in its annual global survey. Topping the list for 2008 are New York, Rome, Paris, Milan, London, Los Angeles, Sydney, Las Vegas, Berlin and Tokyo. Madrid (No. 15), Stockholm (No. 20), Cape Town (No. 23) and New Delhi (No. 24) broke into the Top 25. Falling off the list were Sao Paolo and Bangkok. Other notable movement included Sydney moving up five spots to No.7 and Dubai jumping up twelve spots to No.12. “Our yearly rankings clearly reinforce recent trends: the Big Five (New York, Rome, Paris, Milan, and London), far and away dominate the world of fashion, especially in the eyes of the print and electronic media, as well as on the internet. At the same time, the second tier of the cities in the world fashion rankings are coming on strong,” said Millie Lorenzo Payack, Fashion Correspondent and Director of the Global Language Monitor. “And, by the way, money spent on media outreach can, indeed, make a difference; witness Dubai." The world ‘rag’ business is estimated to be close to one half trillion USD. Regional rankings are provided below. This exclusive ranking is based upon GLM’s Predictive Quantities Index, a proprietary algorithm that tracks words and phrases in print and electronic media, on the Internet and throughout the blogosphere. The words and phrases are tracked in relation to their frequency, contextual usage and appearance in global media outlets. The Top Fashion Cities, 2008 ranking, last year’s rank, and commentary follow. 1) New York (1) - No. 1 for the fifth year running. 2) Rome (2) - The Eternal City, again, a strong No. 2. 3) Paris (3) - Perhaps No. 1 in the world’s hearts and mind - but not the media’s. 4) Milan (5) - Overtakes London in this survey. 5) London (4) - The Elite Five far outdistance the rest. 6) Los Angeles (7) - LA knocks on the door of the Elite Five. 7) Sydney (12) - Sydney makes a huge move, breaking into the Top 10. 8) Las Vegas (9) - The intense media spotlight improves Vegas’ ranking. 9) Berlin (11) - Berlin continues its very strong presence. 10) Tokyo (6) - Tokyo remains the capital of the Asian Fashion Industry. 11) Hong Kong (8) - Threatening to move ahead of Tokyo. 12) Dubai (24) - Massive marketing fueled by petrodollars can make an impact. 13) Shanghai (14) - Vies with Hong Kong for the lead in China. 14) Singapore (10) - Significant fashion infrastructure keeps its ranking strong. 15) Madrid (New) - Reasserts the Iberian fashion lead over Barcelona. 16) Moscow (16) - Firmly ensconces itself in the Top Twenty. 17) Santiago (19) - Leads Latin America. 18) Melbourne (15) - Take a second seat to a high-flying Sydney. 19) Stockholm (New) - First Scandinavian on the list. 20) Buenos Aires (22) - Traditional leader in fashion continues to move up the rankings. 21) Johannesburg (23) - Joburg improves two spots. 22) Mumbai (18) - Mumbai again leads the Subcontinent. 23) Cape Town (New) - Joburg’s rival is new to the list. 24) New Delhi (New) - New Delhi makes the List, but still is outpaced by Bollywood. 25) Barcelona (13) - Still in the Top Twenty-five though Madrid has strong lead. 26) Miami (New) - Makes the list on its leadership in swimwear. 27) Krakow (25) - Share the neo-Bohemian spotlight with Prague. 28) Prague (New) - No neo about this rising center of fashion. 29) Toronto (New) - First Canadian city on the list; Montreal just missed the rankings. 30) Rio de Janeiro (20) - Strong Latin American No. 3 outpacing Sao Paolo. Others in the rankings included Copenhagen, Montreal, Sao Paolo, and Bangkok. Regional Rankings Asia and Oceania: Sydney, Tokyo, Hong Kong, Shanghai, Singapore, Melbourne (Bangkok) Europe: Rome, Paris, Milano, London, Berlin, Madrid, Stockholm, Barcelona (Copenhagen) India: Mumbai, New Delhi Latin America: Santiago, Buenos Aires, Rio de Janeiro (Sao Paolo) Middle and Eastern Europe: Moscow, Krakow, Prague Middle East and Africa: Dubai, Johannesburg, Cape Town North America: New York, Los Angeles, Las Vegas, Miami, Toronto, Montreal
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