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Found 18 results

  1. A une émission de Radio-Canada, on parlait de véhicules élecltriques, dont des autobus entièrement électriques qui arrêteront à des bornes, le long de leur parcours, pour se recharger pendant 1 minute. L'expert disait que la technologie existe déjà, et que les trolley bus (et tramways j'imagine) étaient des technologies dépassées. On disait aussi que le Québec est particulièrement bien placé au niveau du moteur-roue, et des technologies de batteries, pour profiter de la nouvelle vague verte. Voici un exemple: Hybrid-Electric Design ZERO emissions (with hydrogen fuel-cell or battery-electric options) Reduce fuel costs by greater than 90% Fewer parts to maintain with all-electric drivetrain Ultra-quiet drive system reduces noise pollution 90% regenerative braking recapture Unique All-Composite Body Low floor minimizes boarding time and increases passenger safety Impact resistant composite body increases vehicle safety and reduces maintenance Low center of gravity reduces chance for roll over Light weight body reduces impact on streets Modern appearance ADA-friendly design enables all passengers to ride the bus No corrosion - composite body and stainless steel subframe Other Features Safety front door prevents passengers from walking directly in front of the bus Large windshield for increased visibility Driver footwell glass for increased safety Incremental cost paid for by fuel savings http://www.proterraonline.com/transit.asp
  2. I do research at the UQAM science campus and sometimes I see candy wrappers, party-invitation fliers, or pieces of paper on the floor in the halls inside the buildings. This is explained by the large amount of students walking those halls every day, and by the presence of vending machines. This doesn't bother me a lot and I normally just pick them up and put them in the garbage. As you probably know, however, they are extremely dangerous, and the probability of someone slipping is much higher than you would imagine (the chance of someone actually falling is probably not very high but that's another subject, since it has already became a safety issue). A few days ago I saw a sign by the door of an office that read "SAFETY FIRST: NO LITTERING IN THIS AREA." The sign is still there. I found it interesting for various reasons: 1) It was in English (besides the occasional ironic science-related comic strip on the wall by the doors of some professors, I never see anything in English at UQAM). 2) It tackled littering in a complete different manner than the usual "it looks bad." 3) It is the first time I see a sign tackling littering in Montreal, and I think Quebec in general, and it was not official in any way! It was not even in French! (wait, now that I remember there are some signs that look like they haven't been changed since the 60s behind some alleys, and there is those posters that didn't seem to have worked). 4) This sign seemed to have worked. Now I don't know about (4) because it might be that the person who put up the sign had been picking up candy wrappers out of safety concern. But it would have definitely worked for me (if I were among the ones who litter), since the consequence on my actions suddenly goes from annoying some people to possibly killing a person. Anyway I just realized I don't really have a conclusion for this post so I'm gonna try to wrap it up... A while ago I saw a TED lecture by an advertising man on changing the approach to give new value to existing products. I wonder if something similar could be done regarding littering. Would there be less littering if people saw it by default as a safety issue? It seems to me like changing the approach would work. Well I don't think there is any approach here anyway. Most people in Montreal would see me as a redneck for even worrying about littering.
  3. Here are some pics I took during the weekend. The safety and medical cars Lewis Hamilton's mclaren A walk in the Paddock Before the drivers parade Ooooh say can you see... Sorry no racing for you today Pitstop time The Podium
  4. 1:40 Campaign – What happens now? AIR CANADA COMPONENT A MESSAGE FROM THE PRESIDENT Dear members, Last Thursday, on May 22nd, we met with officials with Transport Canada to present our objections and arguments against their proposed regulatory change (NPA – to consult it click HERE http://gallery.mailchimp.com/f6750312d5/files/5a08042b-48e8-48a2-88e3-4536caa1f04a.pdf), which will allow airlines in Canada to flip-flop between the 1:40 ratio and the 1:50 ratio at will, per aircraft type. It is fair to say that we took Transport Canada by surprise last Thursday – a sizable crowd participated in this meeting from across Canada, including over 125 CUPE flight attendants, members of the news media, members of Parliament, and allies representing different groups. We expressed our views forcefully and eloquently, and clearly demonstrated that passenger safety would be compromised if this regulation were approved. During our presentation, we had hoped to screen our newly recorded video testimonial of a survivor of the Air France 358 accident, which supports our position, but Transport Canada prevented us from doing so. If you would like to see this video, please click HERE Furthermore, if you would like to see a recently rediscovered short documentary produced by CUPE in the 1980's that presents a clear case for maintaining the 1:40 ratio, click HERE You will be amazed at the timeliness of the content, and at the undeniable truths that come from the mouths of Canadian flight attendants who survived airplane accidents. Another video is currently circulating which features a photomontage of graphic visual examples of why the 1:40 ratio should be maintained. You can see this video HERE We would encourage you to share the above videos using your own personal networks and social media. The May 22nd session was a learning experience for all of us. It was evident that Transport Canada is determined to give our airlines an unprecedented luxury, which no other country on the planet has. With the flip flop regulation, airlines will be allowed to pick whichever FA ratio leads to the fewest FAs per aircraft type, and then change the ratio whenever it suits the airline’s configuration or financial priorities, with only 60 days notice. TC was also extremely disrespectful to the two NDP MPs who took the time to attend ("the Minister will answer your question") and was unresponsive to many of us who highlighted the negative impact of the proposal on our work and safety ("noted" or some other equally evasive response like "trust us"). We were very successful in obtaining wide news coverage, and had the opportunity to engage the media in print, radio and live television. The quote from TC Cabin Safety inspector Christopher Dann was priceless, and found its way in the Globe and Mail and the Toronto Star, amongst others: The safety level afforded by 1 in 50 "can't be equivalent" to the 1 in 40. With this quote, we have put TC on the defensive. Here are a few great examples of some of the media we received: TELEVISION - RADIO Globe and Mail video report CTV National News TVA nouvelles en direct CBC Radio WRITTEN PRESS CTV News Vancouver Sun Globe and Mail Toronto Star CBC News Here is our plan going forward, and this is where we need your continued help: We will be submitting a comprehensive dissent to the NPA, emphasizing that it is less than what we have today, is unprecedented in the world and has not be proven to be workable or enforceable by Transport Canada, among other such general arguments. Where there are good "mitigating factors", we will endorse them and urge them to be put in place regardless of the FA ratio. Where the "mitigating factors" are ineffective, we will say so and describe the changes that are needed. In addition, we will be re-working our PowerPoint presentation as a separate written submission on what the NPA does not address in the real world of flight attendant work, emergencies and evacuations. Transport Canada will be receiving comments regarding the proposed regulatory change up until June 23, 2014. Please send them your thoughts and opinions. Comments can be sent to: [email protected] and please also send a copy to CUPE Researcher Janet Dassinger: [email protected] to allow us to keep track of them. All of your comments are valuable and should be on the record. There should be emphasis on how the NPA will negatively impact passenger and our safety, particularly on narrow body aircraft but also on wide body aircraft if the airlines are successful in blocking the minimum floor level coverage provision for 1 in 40 operations. Please also request that Transport Canada hold another meeting to allow for further discussion on this important matter. For all submitters, please conclude your submission with the following statement: "I request a written response to my questions and comments before pre-publication of any such regulation in Canada Gazette Part I by return e-mail". Encourage others you may know to make submissions as well on the problems with this NPA. Feel free to have others sign on to your comments so it is coming from more than you alone. Finally, please use your written comments to seek out a meeting with your MP if you have not already done so. State your concerns and stress that what is being proposed in the NPA is less safe than what we have today (as admitted by TC's own Christopher Dann); it is a unique rule that does not meet the international standard despite what Minister Raitt has said; there are no real "mitigating factors" that can compensate for a missing FA; and all of this Transport Canada rule-making must be subjected to a Parliamentary Inquiry. Together we will make a difference. In Solidarity, Michel Cournoyer President Air Canada Component of CUPE Forward to Friend Copyright © 2014 Air Canada Component of CUPE, All rights reserved. You are receiving this email because you have subscribed. Our mailing address is: Air Canada Component of CUPE 25 Belfield Rd. Etobicoke, On M9W 1E8 Canada Add us to your address book unsubscribe from this list update subscription preferences
  5. Yet another crane collapses in NYC... What is it with cranes in NYC? Every month there's a crane collapse story. Are they raised differently? Does it have to do with the crane company's safety standards? This is a most unfortunate occurence that keeps repeating itself. Especially when lives are lost... http://www.cnn.com/2008/US/05/30/crane.collapse/index.html
  6. Roads safe, Quebec insists AMY LUFT, The Gazette Published: 7 hours ago Quebec's Transport Department wants drivers to know the province's highways are safe, despite a metre-wide pothole found on the Turcot Interchange. Still, the road damage reminded some that action needs to be taken quickly to ensure the safety of motorists. "It definitely enforces the point that structures are in bad shape," said Laval Mayor Gilles Vaillancourt, head of a coalition that wants better funding of infrastructure in Quebec. "The bridges won't be demolished tomorrow, but we need to make sure what remains is not in a beautiful state but in a solid state." Engineers have confirmed that the pothole discovered Friday on Highway 15, just north of the exits for Highway 20 and the Ville Marie Expressway, was simply the result of deteriorating asphalt and concrete and was not a structural issue, like those plaguing many Quebec roadways. "Of course, we'd like to reassure people of the safety of the Turcot Interchange," Transport Quebec official Nicole Ste-Marie said. "What happened (Friday) was not related to roadwork on other access ramps." Highway 15 through the Turcot Interchange was reopened to traffic at 7 a.m. yesterday after overnight paving between the exits for Highways 20 and 720 (the Ville Marie Expressway) and the Décarie Expressway. Two lanes were closed about 8:45 a.m. Friday when a motorist drove into the pothole, which ran one metre deep straight through the span. The lanes were shut for about five hours. One lane was shut again Friday afternoon because repairs could not be completed. Structural repairs are to begin tomorrow on 10 of the 12 access ramps to the Turcot Interchange. The work had already been scheduled this week to take advantage of reduced traffic during Quebec's construction holiday. Highways 15, 20 and 720 converge on the Turcot Interchange, which carries an estimated 280,000 vehicles every day. As for the rest of the province's highways and structures, Ste-Marie urged motorists not to worry. "We'll eventually be doing some repairs (to structures), but if there's a problem or safety concern, Transport Quebec never neglects to tell the public." Vaillancourt said he is satisfied with the measures being taken to maintain the overpasses before they are replaced or repaired. "I've discussed the issue with engineers and I've been reassured the upkeep is good," he said, adding that rebuilding the spans "is not going to happen overnight." Vaillancourt is head of the Coalition pour le rénouvellement des infrastructures du Québec. Its members include the provincial federation of municipalities, the Conseil du Patronat employers lobby, and industry and professional associations. Repairs are to continue as planned on the rest of Quebec's troubled overpasses. After the collapse of the de la Concorde Blvd. overpass in Laval in September 2006, which killed five people, and the subsequent inspection of 135 overpasses deemed to be in questionable condition, Quebec has budgeted $2.7 billion for roadwork this year. The lion's share is to be spent to repair or replace overpasses. It's part of a four-year, $12-billion investment to upgrade Quebec's crumbling infrastructure. Transport Quebec said in April the province would replace 25 overpasses and tear down three others. Major repairs on 25 more spans began at that time. At least three of the overpasses to be replaced are in Montreal. They include two on Highway 138 over Monette St. at the Mercier Bridge, both scheduled to be replaced by 2013, and one on Gouin Blvd. over Highway 19, to be replaced in 2009. The Dorval Interchange is to be torn down, though no date has been set. Transport Quebec wants to assure drivers the span is well maintained. "While it will eventually be demolished, right now we are doing sporadic repairs ... to make sure safety is maintained," Ste-Marie said, adding the Dorval Circle is to be reconfigured to ease traffic woes in the area, not because it is unsafe. As for the current state of Quebec's overpasses, Vaillancourt said he's a little nervous, despite the progress. "It's easy to know when there's a hole in the pavement, but it's hard to know when a bridge will collapse," he said. "You never know." [email protected] http://www.canada.com/montrealgazette/news/story.html?id=b45ac453-fbf9-45aa-8380-c55e10568c42&p=2
  7. Imaginez la Scène, 3 voies, la 1ere pour tourner à Gauche, celle du centre pour aller tout droit et la dernière pour tourner à droite. Le cycliste qui veux allez à gauche devrait logiquement se placer entre la 1ere et la 2e voie. Malheureusement c'est rarement le cas et plu souvent qu'autre chose, les cyclistes, ne font pas leur stop ou leur lumières ici à Montréal. Voilà qu'à Portland ils sont en trian d'essayer un projet pilote pour les cycliste qui suivent les règles. qu'en pensez vous. Sources: http://www.treehugger.com/files/2008/03/portlands_bike_boxes.php After recognizing the economic benefits of creating a network of bike paths on city streets, Portland, Oregon has unveiled a new traffic tool designed to ensure cyclists' safety in the city. The bike box is a bright green rectangle painted onto asphalt at intersections and reserved exclusively for bikes. By moving car traffic back several feet from intersections, space is created for bikers at the front of the line, giving them visibility and a measure of priority while waiting at streetlights. The bike box was created as a response to traffic accidents involving right-turning cars running over cyclists, known as a "right hook" accident. The bike box is meant to give bikers greater visibility by positioning them directly in front of waiting cars. Green-colored bike paths will also lead to intersections, and right turns will not be allowed during red lights. Oregon law requires cars to yield to bikes in bike lanes. The bike boxes are being installed at 14 particularly accident-prone intersections, and the city plans to monitor the intersections to see how the bike boxes affecting cyclist safety. An educational campaign, including signs and billboards, is also planned. For a first look at pictures of Portland's new bike boxes, check out this link at BikePortland.org. Also, check out the City of Portland's brochure explaining the bike box here.
  8. Read more: http://www.montrealgazette.com/business/Honda+expands+recall+more+Toyotas+probed/2545016/story.html#ixzz0fArsGWkh Hmm....
  9. Read more: http://www.cbc.ca/canada/montreal/story/2010/01/29/qc-charest-protests-india-asbestos.html#ixzz0e4r4XXPU
  10. Sharing the streets JULIA KILPATRICK, The Gazette Published: 6 hours ago Skateboard users risk fines as well as injury when they travel on public arteries like sidewalks or bike paths. But while aficionados complain about the regulations, police say their goal is safety Turning his back to the traffic screaming past a small skateboard park east of the Gay Village, Kyle Naylor pulled his board out of his backpack. The skateboard was split in two jagged pieces. A car had run over it earlier, when Naylor was skating to the park for an afternoon session with friends. "My friends all put in some cash so I could buy a new board," Naylor, 18, said. Email to a friendEmail to a friendPrinter friendlyPrinter friendly Font: "We didn't want to miss out on our skate day." Skateboard commuters like Naylor risk more than a broken board when they choose to ride on the street. Bylaws prohibit skateboarding on Montreal's roads and sidewalks. Fines for ignoring the rules range from $30 to $300. Commander Daniel Touchette, of the Montreal police traffic division, says the fines are justified because skateboarders are not equipped to share the roads with other vehicles. "The regulations exist for the safety of skateboarders," he said. "If they are on the street and they fall, there's no saying where they might go." Naylor's broken board appears to support that argument, but the statistics don't. Montreal police issued 116 tickets for offences related to skateboarding or inline skating in the street in 2006, Touchette said. Police records don't specify when a motor vehicle accident involves a skateboarder, yet Touchette said that, to his knowledge, there have been no serious or fatal accidents involving skateboarders in the past year. Last year, the city added 25 kilometres of bicycle lanes on the island in an effort to curb greenhouse gas emissions and encourage the use of alternative transportation. But while those lanes are open to cyclists and inline skaters, they are closed to skateboarders, leaving many frustrated by the city's refusal to see skateboarding as a legitimate means of transportation. "It's ecological, and you can take public transit with it, which you can't with your bike," said Alex Jarry, 31, manager of the Underworld skateboard shop on Ste. Catherine St. E., near Sanguinet St. He travels to and from work daily on his skateboard, and says concerns about the safety of boarding in the street are overblown. "People who skate in the street, they control their board," he said. "If you don't feel confident to ride in the traffic, you don't do it." Naylor said he would rather try his luck in the street than compete for space on the sidewalk, as some less experienced skateboarders do. The issue made national headlines recently after Fredericton resident Lee Breen, 25, spent a night in jail for refusing to pay a $100 fine for skateboarding on city roads. Naylor and his friends Alex Potter, 19, and Ryan Baird, 18, ride their boards everywhere - and pay the price. All three have been fined for skateboarding on public property, including streets, sidewalks and parks. "Everybody I know, they've got fined for skateboarding," Jarry said. "It's legal to sell skateboards and illegal to practise it." That's not the case, Touchette said: "It's not illegal. You have parks and other places where you can use them for sport." Skateboarders can hone their skills legally at more than 30 outdoor parks across the city. But commuters who would rather skateboard than drive a car do so at their own risk - physically and financially. "For transportation, you cannot use a skateboard to move from place to place in the streets of Montreal," Touchette said. [email protected] http://www.canada.com/montrealgazette/news/story.html?id=7d7951ab-8d48-4b4c-bafa-3fa2843eac88
  11. http://spacingmontreal.ca/2011/05/01/saint-pierre-river-site-to-become-montreals-first-woonerf/ Definition of a woonerf: A woonerf (Dutch plural: woonerven) in the Netherlands and Flanders is a street where pedestrians and cyclists have legal priority over motorists. The techniques of shared spaces, traffic calming, and low speed limits are intended to improve pedestrian, bicycle, and automobile safety.
  12. 1-50 Regulation in Effect for all Aircrafts as of August 1, 2015 Transport Canada has announced that the 1:50 ratio will be the new regulation in effect for both wide and narrow-bodied aircraft effective August 1, 2015. Airlines will be able to “flip flop” between the former 1:40 ratio and the new 1:50 ratio according to their operational requirements. Exit doors may also be left uncovered on wide-bodied aircraft, a major change from previous proposed regulations. Your Union views this development as a completely unacceptable and unnecessary risk to the safety of both crewmembers and the public. In changing the regulation without the usual consultation process, Transport Canada and the Harper government continue to act on behalf of the airline industry and in a manner that is without sufficient parliamentary and public scrutiny. Decades of privatization, deregulation and hyper-competition have led to a relentless drive to cut labour costs. Transport Canada makes no secret of this, and has calculated that the regulation will allow operators to achieve cost savings of $288,469,940 during the next ten years by reducing the number of Flight Attendants and associated costs including salaries, hotel stays and per diems. To read the new regulation, please see: http://gazette.gc.ca/rp-pr/p2/2015/2015-06-17/html/sor-dors127-eng.php. For the federal government and its transportation officials to so baldly place profit over safety is a national disgrace. It appears this government has learned nothing from the rail tragedy in Lac Megantic, which has also been linked to deregulation and the loosening of safety rules Your Union is reviewing all available options to continue our legal fight against the 1:50. We will update you on our intended response as soon as possible. We also look forward to the upcoming federal election, which we are confident will oust Harper and elect a government that supports worker rights and public safety. But to achieve that goal, our members must do their part. The Airline Division Political Action Committee will be working hard between now and the election to turn out Flight Attendants to vote. We will bring the full weight of our safety expertise forward to the new government and the public. Our research on this issue has been extensive, and is grounded in the real life understanding of the safety risks associated with reduced cabin crew. In fact, we believe our members’ real life experience is the best possible evidence that 1:50 jeopardizes safety, disrupts service, and reduces the job satisfaction and morale of Flight Attendants. During the past several months we have been compiling our members’ stories about the effect of 1:50. In the coming weeks, we will publish a series of bulletins that capture the voices of members describing how 1:50 has affected them on and off the job. Each bulletin will describe a different aspect of how 1:50 has affected them, including at work where members report increased fatigue, anxiety about decreased safety and service; and at home, where members report reduced income, greater stress and depression, and harm to personal relationships and overall wellbeing. These stories are gleaned from the responses of well over 100 Flight Attendants who responded to questionnaires made available by the Component and CUPE Local 4092. We encourage members to continue to share their stories in the months to come. Please follow the next bulletins. Your Union remains committed to fighting the 1:50 ratio on the legal, regulatory, and political levels. http://accomponent.ca/
  13. Look at these pics..kind of courageous or foolhardy??? Where's the CSST?? Great bygone era photos from the great metropolis of New York City. Just gives me goose bumps looking at these men who are long forgotten but their work still lives on and gives us, skyscraper fans, thrills... Skyscraper Lunch These photos depict scenes of workers who participated in the construction of skyscrapers between 1920 and 1935. As you will see, the safety measures were somewhat peculiar. These pics are from the following medical advice Guru. :applause: