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Found 5 results

  1. Newbie

    Garbage Cans

    Hi! I hope this post is not miscategorized. Since I moved to Montreal I have been looking forward to seen these old garbage cans replaced: They are too small, break easily, are always leaking, and most of them have lots of garbage under them which looks really bad (I don't even know how it gets there though I have a few theories). Anyway, in 2007 I found out that Michel Dallaire (the BIXI industrial designer) was to design new benches and garbage cans for downtown: http://www.ledevoir.com/2007/12/17/168881.html In 2008, renderings of the new designs appeared on his website: http://www.dallairedesign.com/flash/index.html And after that nothing happened. Is there any way to know what happened to this? Are they ever going to be replaced?
  2. Roads safe, Quebec insists AMY LUFT, The Gazette Published: 7 hours ago Quebec's Transport Department wants drivers to know the province's highways are safe, despite a metre-wide pothole found on the Turcot Interchange. Still, the road damage reminded some that action needs to be taken quickly to ensure the safety of motorists. "It definitely enforces the point that structures are in bad shape," said Laval Mayor Gilles Vaillancourt, head of a coalition that wants better funding of infrastructure in Quebec. "The bridges won't be demolished tomorrow, but we need to make sure what remains is not in a beautiful state but in a solid state." Engineers have confirmed that the pothole discovered Friday on Highway 15, just north of the exits for Highway 20 and the Ville Marie Expressway, was simply the result of deteriorating asphalt and concrete and was not a structural issue, like those plaguing many Quebec roadways. "Of course, we'd like to reassure people of the safety of the Turcot Interchange," Transport Quebec official Nicole Ste-Marie said. "What happened (Friday) was not related to roadwork on other access ramps." Highway 15 through the Turcot Interchange was reopened to traffic at 7 a.m. yesterday after overnight paving between the exits for Highways 20 and 720 (the Ville Marie Expressway) and the Décarie Expressway. Two lanes were closed about 8:45 a.m. Friday when a motorist drove into the pothole, which ran one metre deep straight through the span. The lanes were shut for about five hours. One lane was shut again Friday afternoon because repairs could not be completed. Structural repairs are to begin tomorrow on 10 of the 12 access ramps to the Turcot Interchange. The work had already been scheduled this week to take advantage of reduced traffic during Quebec's construction holiday. Highways 15, 20 and 720 converge on the Turcot Interchange, which carries an estimated 280,000 vehicles every day. As for the rest of the province's highways and structures, Ste-Marie urged motorists not to worry. "We'll eventually be doing some repairs (to structures), but if there's a problem or safety concern, Transport Quebec never neglects to tell the public." Vaillancourt said he is satisfied with the measures being taken to maintain the overpasses before they are replaced or repaired. "I've discussed the issue with engineers and I've been reassured the upkeep is good," he said, adding that rebuilding the spans "is not going to happen overnight." Vaillancourt is head of the Coalition pour le rénouvellement des infrastructures du Québec. Its members include the provincial federation of municipalities, the Conseil du Patronat employers lobby, and industry and professional associations. Repairs are to continue as planned on the rest of Quebec's troubled overpasses. After the collapse of the de la Concorde Blvd. overpass in Laval in September 2006, which killed five people, and the subsequent inspection of 135 overpasses deemed to be in questionable condition, Quebec has budgeted $2.7 billion for roadwork this year. The lion's share is to be spent to repair or replace overpasses. It's part of a four-year, $12-billion investment to upgrade Quebec's crumbling infrastructure. Transport Quebec said in April the province would replace 25 overpasses and tear down three others. Major repairs on 25 more spans began at that time. At least three of the overpasses to be replaced are in Montreal. They include two on Highway 138 over Monette St. at the Mercier Bridge, both scheduled to be replaced by 2013, and one on Gouin Blvd. over Highway 19, to be replaced in 2009. The Dorval Interchange is to be torn down, though no date has been set. Transport Quebec wants to assure drivers the span is well maintained. "While it will eventually be demolished, right now we are doing sporadic repairs ... to make sure safety is maintained," Ste-Marie said, adding the Dorval Circle is to be reconfigured to ease traffic woes in the area, not because it is unsafe. As for the current state of Quebec's overpasses, Vaillancourt said he's a little nervous, despite the progress. "It's easy to know when there's a hole in the pavement, but it's hard to know when a bridge will collapse," he said. "You never know." [email protected] http://www.canada.com/montrealgazette/news/story.html?id=b45ac453-fbf9-45aa-8380-c55e10568c42&p=2
  3. Montreal police logo transformed to five-pointed star ANNE SUTHERLAND, The Gazette Published: 7 hours ago Montreal police have banished the river, the mountain, the downtown skyline and the cross on Mount Royal. These symbols of the city, emblazoned on Montreal police cars and police officers' shoulders since 1972, are being replaced with a logo that features a five-pointed star and the word "police." The star represents the human form, showing that the public is the primary concern of the police, said Sgt. Ian Lafrenière, a police spokesperson. The logo will be painted on police vehicles as the rolling stock is replaced and stitched onto new police uniforms as they are issued. "The logos will be on all uniforms over three years and on all police vehicles in five years," said Ville Marie borough councillor Catherine Sévigny, a member of the Montreal island council's public security committee. The logo will also be on the uniforms of parking meter attendants, police cadets, métro cops, crossing guards, taxi inspectors and all others who work under the authority of the Montreal police department. The cost of designing the new logo was less than $25,000, Montreal police Chief Inspector Paul Chablo said. Also next year, 12 community stations will be merged into six, putting an extra 200 officers on the streets, police chief Yvan Delorme said. [email protected]
  4. Does anyone know if there is any way an individual with enough money could purchase one of the old Metro wagons after they are replaced by the new trains?
  5. Voici comment nos projets (une "tour" de 7 étages) naissent à Montréal: dans la contreverse! Publié le 20 janvier 2011 à 08h18 | Mis à jour à 08h18 Le MBAM s'oppose à la construction d'une tour Gabriel Béland La Presse Le tout nouveau pavillon du MBAM devait avoir une vue imprenable sur le mont Royal. Dans le plan des architectes, les visiteurs devaient pouvoir contempler les oeuvres d'art tout en admirant la montagne. Mais tout ça est maintenant mis en péril par le projet de construction d'une tour de 25 m tout près du musée, a appris La Presse. Cette tour d'habitation, qui serait érigée sur le terrain où se trouve l'actuelle maison Redpath, contreviendrait au règlement d'urbanisme de l'arrondissement et viendrait bloquer la vue sur le mont Royal, dénonce le Musée des beaux-arts de Montréal. Sa directrice générale, Nathalie Bondil, a même écrit au maire Gérald Tremblay pour l'exhorter à bloquer le projet. Elle demande que le futur immeuble, situé à un jet de pierre du musée et de son annexe, respecte le plan d'urbanisme et n'excède pas 16 m de hauteur. «Le Musée s'est astreint à concevoir son projet d'annexe en fonction du règlement de zonage, rappelle le directeur de l'administration du MBAM, Paul Lavallée. La Ville nous a obligés à en limiter le volume. Et puis arrive ce projet d'un promoteur privé qui, lui, obtient une dérogation. C'est majeur.» Sept étages plutôt que trois Amos et Michael Sochaczevski, propriétaires de la maison Redpath, veulent la démolir presque entièrement. À la place de l'immeuble patrimonial, ils entendent ériger une tour de 25 m et 7 étages, même si le règlement d'urbanisme interdit de dépasser 16 m et 3 étages. Ville-Marie et son maire, Gérald Tremblay, ont donné leur accord au projet et à une série de dérogations au règlement d'urbanisme le 8 novembre dernier. Paul Lavallée n'hésite pas à qualifier le projet de «néfaste» pour le Musée. Il rappelle que la verrière qui couronne le nouveau pavillon de 40 millions a été construite justement pour la vue sur la montagne. «Le design de la verrière veut permettre au public de voir la montagne, dit-il. Tout ça va être bloqué. Ça va tout bousiller.» «C'est inacceptable», dénonce l'architecte responsable de l'annexe du musée, Claude Provencher, associé de la firme Provencher Roy " Associés. «Quand on a conçu la verrière, on ne s'attendait pas à se retrouver avec un édifice d'une telle hauteur» tout près. Le MBAM a fait faire une étude d'impact pour savoir comment la construction d'une tour de sept étages à la place de la maison Redpath allait nuire à son nouveau pavillon. Les conclusions sont éloquentes: la vue sur la montagne est presque complètement obstruée par la tour, constate-t-on sur une simulation (photos ci-dessus). Le nouveau pavillon du musée a été aménagé juste en face de l'actuel Musée des beaux-arts, dans l'ancienne église Erskine and American. Le Musée espère avec cette annexe doubler la superficie qu'il consacre à l'art canadien. Le pavillon, dont la construction sera achevée dans quatre semaines, doit être inauguré en septembre. L'arrondissement doit encore approuver le projet en troisième lecture au début du mois de février. Les deux conseillers de l'opposition - François Robillard, de Vision Montréal, et Pierre Mainville, de Projet Montréal - devraient voter contre. Tout indique que les conseillers d'Union Montréal voteront pour, y compris le maire de Montréal et de l'arrondissement, Gérald Tremblay. http://www.cyberpresse.ca/actualites/regional/montreal/201101/20/01-4361884-le-mbam-soppose-a-la-construction-dune-tour.php
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