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Found 6 results

  1. - On peu voir le Queen's Hotel sur la rue Peel, coin Saint-Jacques, et l'annexe à coté. Démolition de l'annexe:
  2. amNY.com Extreme Commuter: From Montreal to Queens By Justin Rocket Silverman, amNewYork Staff Writer [email protected] January 28, 2008 [/url] This Extreme Commuter rides a plane the way most of us ride the subway. Professor Adnan Turkey lives in Montreal but teaches computer science at DeVry Institute of Technology in Long Island City. He's been making that commute once a week for nine years, 45 weeks a year. Although the flight itself is only about 75 minutes long, getting to and from the airport makes it impractical to make the ride daily. Price is a factor, too. Flying directly from Montreal is too expensive even once a week, so for half the ticket price he drives across the border to fly out of Burlington, Vt. So every Monday at noon he leaves his house in Canada and makes that 2-hour trip to Vermont. He puts the car in long-term parking ($6 a day) and flies to New York, where he will sleep in a small rented apartment and teach until Thursday afternoon. Then he takes the flight and drives back home. Door-to-door it's about seven hours each way. "After working many years in Canada, I thought, 'why not come to New York City?'" he asks. "It's just next door and it's the capital of the world." Adnan knows of no other commuters on the Montreal/New York City run, and says many of the border guards laugh in amazement when he states his business in the U.S. Although the weekly $150-round trip JetBlue ticket, and the monthly rent in New York takes a bit out of his income (he won't say how much), Adnan says he has no plans to ask his wife, also a university teacher, and two college-age daughters to move to New York. Besides, money has never been his primary interest. "Education is a noble mission, so salary is not the No. 1 concern, at least for me," he says. "When I see the next generation of students learning and becoming skilled, that's my job satisfaction." Know an Extreme Commuter? Transit reporter Marlene Naanes wants to hear the story. Email her at [email protected] Copyright © 2008, AM New York http://www.amny.com/sports/football/giants/am-commuter0128,0,4574142,print.story
  3. L'avertissement des banques à l'Ontario Mise à jour le mercredi 17 décembre 2008, 15 h 25 . Les grandes banques canadiennes affirment que l'Ontario perdra des emplois si le gouvernement n'abaisse pas son impôt aux sociétés. Dans un document présenté dans le cadre des consultations prébudgétaires, l'Association des banquiers canadiens (ABC) réclame que le taux d'imposition passe de 14 % à 10 %. Une baisse de quatre points de pourcentage représenterait 6 milliards de dollars de moins dans les coffres de la province. La présidente de l'ABC, Nancy Hughes Anthony, évoque le manque supposé de compétitivité de la province et laisse entendre que des emplois dans le domaine des affaires pourraient être perdus si Queen's Park ne se conforme pas à sa prescription. Interrogé à ce sujet mercredi matin à Saskatoon, le ministre des Finances de l'Ontario, Dwight Duncan, bouillait de rage. « Je rappellerai aux grandes banques que nous éliminons la taxe sur le capital et que des gens perdent leurs emplois tous les jours. Je ne crois pas que les menaces soient la bonne façon de faire des affaires. - Dwight Duncan, ministre des Finances de l'Ontario » Le premier ministre Dalton McGuinty a réagi plus posément en suggérant aux banques de recommencer à accorder des prêts financiers aux entreprises si elles souhaitent réellement aider l'économie. M. McGuinty ajoute que si l'Ontario envoyait moins d'argent à Ottawa, sa province pourrait accélérer les diminutions d'impôts aux entreprises. À Queen's Park, seuls les conservateurs croient que le gouvernement devrait réduire son impôt aux sociétés. Mais ils ajoutent que les grandes banques pourraient contribuer à stimuler l'économie si elles refilaient en entier à leurs clients les baisses de taux décrétées par la Banque du Canada. Extrait vidéoAppel aux banques pour faciliter le passage de la crise, explique Christian Grégoire.
  4. Le constructeur automobile demanderait un prêt garanti de 1 milliard de dollars à Ottawa et à Queen's Park. Pour en lire plus...
  5. Devant le refus des républicains d'aider l'industrie automobile qui bat de l'aile, Queen's Park contemple la possibilité d'un plan de sauvetage temporaire à l'échelle nord-américaine. Pour en lire plus...
  6. November 09, 2010 8:43 AM by Staff & Wire Reports http://www.gamingtoday.com/articles/...SOP_main_event Canadian poker professional Jonathan Duhamel won the World Series of Poker main event title and $8.94 million on Monday night after keeping a stranglehold on his chips and pressuring his opponent. Duhamel took the last of Florida pro John Racener's chips in the no-limit Texas Hold 'em tournament with an ace high after 43 hands where Racener was no better than a 4-1 underdog in chips. Duhamel pushed Racener all-in and the Floridian called with a suited king-eight of diamonds. But Duhamel had an unsuited ace-jack for the lead. A flop of two fours and a nine helped neither player; and Racener didn't improve with a six on the turn and a five on the river. "It's a dream come true right now," Duhamel told the crowd at the Rio All-Suite Hotel & Casino as confetti fell from a theater ceiling. "It's like the most beautiful day of my life." "Come join the party," he said, flanked by some 200 friends and family who rooted him on while wearing Montreal Canadiens jerseys. Duhamel, an online cash game player who said poker has been his primary income for about two years, had his third cash at this year's series. But the money he won Monday night dwarfs the $43,000 he won after entering 17 earlier tournaments at the 57-event series this year. "I love playing poker so much, so I mean I'm going to be playing all those big tournaments and try to make other big scores," he said. "I'll be there next year in the World Series and try to do my best again." Duhamel, a French and English speaker who left the Universite du Quebec a Montreal during his second year studying finance, worked a series of odd jobs before playing poker full-time. He said he played for $5 and $10 minimums before the series. Now he plans to play in the world's biggest tournaments -- and buy Canadiens season tickets. "I didn't expect that at all," he said. Racener won $5.55 million for second place, never finding real traction in the biggest heads-up card match of his life. Racener said his only good hand was pocket queens and he didn't pick up anything besides that better than an ace-deuce. "I could never get anything going," said Racener, 24, of Port Richey, Fla. "It was unfortunate and he played it well." Duhamel came into the heads-up match with a significant chip lead and kept Racener from gaining much ground in a session that lasted just over an hour. Duhamel had nearly 90 percent of all the chips in play when players took a 10-minute break after 36 hands. The Boucherville, Quebec native intensified the pressure after that, pushing all in on three straight hands and dropping Racener's stack to just above 16 million chips. When Duhamel pushed again, Racener unsuccessfully tried to make a stand. Racener doubled his chips 10 hands into the session, after Duhamel had whittled his stack early on. An 11-1 underdog in chips, Racener called Duhamel's all-in wager with pocket queens and they held against Duhamel's king-four. The hand came just after minimum bets rose and gave Racener 36.9 million chips -- but he was back to his original stack less than 20 hands later. Racener began the session a 6-1 underdog in chips, with just 26 big blinds in his stack at 30.75 million. He spent most of the final table that started Saturday on the sidelines, watching as his opponents aggressively ate at each other's chip stacks. He didn't risk all his chips until he called a bluff by Filippo Candio with three queens, and doubled up twice more before watching as Duhamel withstood a high-pressure challenge from third-place finisher Joseph Cheong. The hand brought Duhamel back where he started the final table -- with a big chip lead. Chips have no monetary value in the tournament, and Racener had to lose all his chips to be eliminated. The tournament started in July with 7,319 players paying $10,000 each to enter.
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