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Found 10 results

  1. http://www.thrillist.com/drink/montreal/montreal-s-first-map-of-bars-near-the-metro-montreal-metro-bar-map <article itemscope="" itemtype="http://schema.org/Article" id="node-3601078" class="node node-article-view" style="max-width: 640px; margin-bottom: 1em;">INTRODUCING MONTREAL'S FIRST METRO BAR MAP PUBLISHED ON 5/21/2014 BY KATHERINE SEHL For all its greatness, using the Montreal Metro can occasionally be an experience that leaves you needing a stiff drink, so we’ve put together a guide to help you do just that -- by plotting out the best bar within a 5-10 minute walk of every one of the most popular stops on the map (and therefore excluding the industrial bar-wasteland of the Orange Line’s Northwest corner, the drinkery-free parks & suburbia tagged onto the ends of the Green Line, and the Yellow Line’s teetotal island layover). Check out a blown-up version of the map here, and see below for each line in its individual glory. </article>
  2. Popular Lebanese eatery Boustan changes hands. http://www.montrealgazette.com/life/Popular+Lebanese+eatery+Boustan+changes+hands/6356953/story.html
  3. http://www.montrealgazette.com/business/Realtor+lose+Montreal+listings/9285009/story.html Realtor.ca to lose Montreal listings BY ALLISON LAMPERT, GAZETTE REAL ESTATE REPORTER DECEMBER 13, 2013 7:10 PM Starting Jan. 1, Montreal brokers will only be able to list homes for sale on Centris.ca, a real estate website unique to Quebec. Photograph by: DAVE SIDAWAY , The Gazette MONTREAL — The Canadian Real Estate Association’s popular Realtor.ca website — widely known as the MLS — will no longer list Montreal homes for sale. The Greater Montreal Real Estate Board said Friday its brokers have voted in favour of separating from CREA. Starting Jan. 1, Montreal brokers will only be able to list homes for sale on Centris.ca, a real estate website unique to Quebec. Real estate brokers who favoured separating from CREA won by 66 votes out of 3,826 votes cast. Montreal’s 9,700 brokers will no longer be able to list homes for sale on Realtor.ca — also known as the Multiple Listing Service — or on CREA’s ICX.ca, which features commercial properties. “We were disappointed when we saw the decision,” said CREA spokesperson Pierre Leduc. Leduc could not say how many listings were generated by CREA’s Montreal membership. Quebec’s 17,000 brokers currently generate 80,000 listings on Realtor.ca. Brokers from four real estate boards located in Montreal, Quebec City, Granby and Drummondville have voted to leave CREA, while brokers from the Saguenay and the Laurentians will make a choice on whether to separate next week. The votes follow a lengthy dispute over rising fees for members, duplication of services like the Realtor and Centris websites, along with a brewing turf war over the listing of Quebec homes for a flat fee by out-of-province brokers. The Montreal board has objected to instances of brokers from Ontario — who are not subject to Quebec’s strict professional rules — listing a home in the Belle Province for a flat fee. CREA said it cannot stop its members from Ontario, or other provinces, from listing homes for sale in Quebec. Citing October data, the Montreal board said Centris was the fourth most popular real estate website geared at buying or renting a residential property in Quebec, with Realtor.ca ranked ninth. The most popular site was Kijiji. However, several Montreal brokers told The Gazette they were concerned about the decline in visibility that comes with losing access to Realtor.ca at a time of a softening Montreal real estate market. Leduc said Montreal-area brokers who are unhappy with the “yes vote” can join one of Quebec’s eight boards that are still members of CREA. He said he’s also heard of a “partitionist” movement among brokers who want to set up a separate Montreal real estate board that would remain part of CREA. “CREA will support these endeavours.” [email protected] Twitter: RealDealMtl
  4. "Alice in Lark Land" http://www.oldcarbrochures.com/static/NA/Studebaker/1962_Studebaker/1962-Alice%20in%20Lark%20Land/dirindex.html I especially like "when you get a flat, pull over to the side of the road, put on fresh lipstick, get out, wave and look helpless and feminine" (p. 15) (I like this one since it is so true ) I also like "when driving on an expressway, use distractions like the radio" For context, it seems to have been a booklet supplied with the Studebaker Lark for '62. It was a popular car with ladies as the car was small, and also Studebakers had a feature that held the brake for you on a hill, so that starting the car off from a stop on a grade was a trivial operation, which made them attractive to feeble drivers.
  5. (Courtesy of KDVR Fox 31) The previous topic was written by a woman from here but was published from the Globe and Mail. I found that out when I did some research on the writer.
  6. Have any of you seen the previews for this new show on ABC. Its a remake of the popular V tv show from the early 80's. It looks pretty fvcking awesome!! Go to the ABC website, and you can watch a 10 minute preview trailer. Looks good! http://abc.go.com/shows/v
  7. J'ai failli tomber de ma chaise...venant du Globe I’m in love. Montreal has always reminded me of an unapproachable crush – it’s arty and sophisticated, and, to me, seems to possess an impenetrable coolness. In recent years, the rise of its indie music scene, trendsetting street fashion and unapologetically rustic comfort cuisine has only added to its mystique. On previous visits, I had felt every bit the awkward outsider. I’d wander the streets of Old Montreal or take in the view from atop Mount Royal, keenly aware that those who lived here were going to the better bars, eating fabulous food and participating in all sorts of amazing activities that I couldn’t even begin to imagine. This time, I wanted to crack that barrier. So I joined a tour. Guided tours are typically the antithesis of cool. But Shea Mayer’s Fitz & Follwell Co. is a different kind of tour company. As the Montreal resident explains, his cycling tours aren’t just meant to take visitors to the most popular tourist attractions. Rather, they’re based on his idea of a perfect day in the city. “That’s how I designed the routes: What’s my favourite bagel place? Where do I think the best coffee is? What do I do when I go down to the market?” he says. His Bike & Yoga tour, for example, takes visitors through the bohemian neighbourhood of Le Plateau, with a break along the way for smoothies at his favourite juice bar and stops for yoga sessions in three of the area’s tranquil parks. His all-day Mountainside to Riverbank package offers a more challenging ride for seasoned cyclists up to the top of Mount Royal, then down along the St. Lawrence River to Saint-Helen’s and Notre Dame Islands. I chose to tag along on his ’Hoods and Hidden Gems tour, lured by the promise I would be immersed “in the local hangouts of the city’s hippest habitants.” Upon my arrival at his Mount-Royal West Avenue shop, Mr. Mayer sets me up with a sleek black city cruiser, which he has christened “Jeanne,” after the pioneering Montreal nurse Jeanne Mance. (All of the bikes at his shop are similarly named after the city’s historic figures, like “Molson” after the beer tycoon, and “Lili” after the legendary burlesque dancer Lili St Cyr.) Montreal is renowned for being a bike-friendly city, with designated cycling lanes throughout the side streets and thoroughfares. It’s also the launching pad for the now-famous Bixi, a bike-sharing system that allows users to rent a vehicle from one of the many stations scattered around town and deposit it at another station when they’re finished riding. The system has proved so popular that cities around the world, from Toronto to Melbourne, have adopted it. But because Bixi bikes are meant for only short commutes, they’re not ideal for longer, leisurely trips. My Jeanne offers a smoother ride. Mr. Mayer leads our small group through the tony francophone enclave of Outremont and Le Plateau. Along our route, he stops to point out quirky details, not always found in guide books, such as where larpers (live action role players) gather to enact their fantastical battles or where resident bohemians hold their “tam tams,” or drum sessions. We stop to pick up freshly baked bagels at the Montreal institution St. Viateur Bagel, and tote them across the street to Mr. Mayer’s neighbourhood hangout, Café Olympico, where he orders us the café’s specialty espresso coffees. La suite ici: http://www.theglobeandmail.com/life/travel/destinations/travel-canada/how-i-fell-in-love-with-montreal/article2192143/
  8. Source, TheStar For the thirsty traveller with a hankering for hops and a soft spot for the little guy, there may be no better place to visit than Montreal. Brew pubs and microbreweries abound and most are within stumbling distance of major hotels, bed and breakfasts and hostels. The city is also home to one of the biggest beer festivals in North America. The June 3-7 Mondial de la biere will showcase some 300 different brands of beer made by upwards of 100 brew pubs as well as large and small-scale breweries – the majority of them from Quebec. Festival spokeswoman Marie-Josee Lefebvre said there are more than 70 brew pubs and microbreweries in the province with three or four new ones opening every year. "They call us little Belgium because of the growing (number) of microbreweries," she said. "I think Quebec people love and enjoy tasting and discovering beer because it's in our roots to share good moments with friends around a good beer." The popular festival, which will mark its 16th year, is free and visitors need only purchase beer tickets at a buck apiece to begin sampling. Lineups, however, could be long, especially on weekends, and a four-ounce sampler could cost as many as five tickets. Lefebvre said the festival, which last year attracted some 80,000 people, is becoming increasingly popular among tourists. "We have a lot of people coming up from the U.S. and Europe," she said. "I receive many emails during the year from people who say, 'I want to plan my vacation in Montreal and I want to attend the Mondial de la biere."' For those seeking a more low-key brew experience any time of the year, Montreal has more than a dozen pubs featuring a variety of home brews. Among the most revered for its innovation is Dieu du Ciel in the city's trendy Plateau-Mont-Royal area. The 10-year-old pub doesn't look like much with its hand-scribbled chalkboard signs and run-of-the-mill finger foods but that's just because at Dieu du Ciel, it's all about the beer. "The goal here is always to brew the best beer possible and to also brew a lot of different beers," says co-owner Stephane Ostiguy. "We like to play with spices and stuff like this. We always like to bring something new to the beer scene." The pub, which has nine on-site fermenters, has experimented with some 60 recipes over the years and offers a large rotation of beers. Ostiguy said there are between 14 and 17 beers available on tap at any given time including favourites like the popular Imperial coffee stout. All are made with quality ingredients, be it coffee, peppercorns or hibiscus flowers and, as such, prices may be higher than they are for the average pint. Students and young professionals between 25 and 35 make up the bulk of its clientele but American beer enthusiasts have been known to stop by for a pint. Another popular brew pub is Brutopia – a three-floor downtown hangout where regulars mingle with tourists and live music and tapas are always on special. In business since March 1997, the pub offers a variety of seasonal beers as well as tried and true staples that are all brewed on site by its brewmaster. While the bar has some 50 different recipes, its staples include a traditional, hoppy pale ale, a light blond, a honey ale, a nutty brown malt and a raspberry beer. It also has such seasonal beers as a maple cream, a chocolate stout and a Scotch ale. "We try to stay faithful to a lot and then we keep a certain amount of production space for seasonal recipes," said manager Jeffery Picard, who describes Brutopia's beer as "delicious" and ``affordable." While he once knew every single competitor personally, he admits there's been a proliferation of brew pubs in the city and believes it could have something to do with Quebec culture. "Maybe it's part of the slightly anti-establishment culture, the alternative culture," he said. Acclaimed beer writer Stephen Beaumont, who has penned a half-dozen books and countless articles about the bubbly elixir, said Quebec has shown more innovation in brewing than any other province. He calls Quebecers "artisanally inclined when it comes to food and drink," and that it was a major market for niche Belgian and French beers long before craft brewing really took off. Blanche de Chambly, he said, was the first Belgian white brewed in North America, while Les Brasseurs du Nord invented the ``rousse." Still, he said, many Quebec microbreweries remain unknown outside of the province and he encourages beer lovers visiting the province's most populous city to get acquainted with them. "I would strongly recommend a Montreal brew pub crawl to anyone with an interest in beer," he said. "Begin the evening with a Czech-style Pilsner on the terrace at L'amere a boire, then head around the corner to Cheval Blanc for their seasonal specialties before finishing the night at Dieu du Ciel trying almost everything they have on tap. "That would be a night well spent."