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Found 8 results

  1. Qu'est ce que tu as fait pour être banni? De toute façon je trouve que ça commence à devenir SALEMENT plate sur ce forum!!! En passant je suis graupner!!
  2. Bienvenue à Montréal! Ils ont été arreté 3 fois dans la meme journée et ils ont recu 2 contraventions http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/montreal/ontario-licence-plates-targeted-by-police-couple-claims-1.2564815 Ontario licence plates targeted by police, couple claims A Quebec couple got pulled over three times in one day while driving in a car with an Ontario licence plate CBC News Posted: Mar 07, 2014 9:15 PM ET Last Updated: Mar 07, 2014 9:15 PM ET Caroline Guy and Joey Menscik say they will contest the two traffic tickets they got in the same day. (CBC) A Quebec couple is crying foul after being ticketed twice, and pulled over a third time — all in the same day. Caroline Guy and Joey Menscik say they feel they were targeted for having an Ontario licence plate. The two were driving east on Hochelaga Street Thursday when they suddenly saw the flashing lights of an unmarked police car. “He gives me this ticket for $162. So I say ‘Why is that?’ and he says in Quebec we're not allowed tinted windows,” said Menscik, adding that he told the officer he was from Ontario. The couple has homes in both Ontario and Quebec. The couple got two fines of $162 each in the same day. (CBC) Guy was pulled over a few years ago for the same reason — with a Quebec plate on her car — and said the officer was more understanding. “I was given a warning to have the tint removed, that I'd have to go back to the station to prove that I'd had it removed, which I did and I had no issues with that,” Guy said. They wonder why they weren’t given a warning this time. Montreal police officials say an officer may use discretionary power, but the highway code is clear. “Seventy per cent of the light must pass through the windows that are both to the left and to the right of the driver. That is applicable to all vehicles that pass through the province,” said Sgt. Laurent Gingras of the Montreal police department. Gingras says when drivers take their vehicle into another jurisdiction, they should be aware of the rules and regulations and are expected to conform to them. Stopped twice in 10 minutes After Menscik’s $162-fine for the tinted windows, the couple was stopped again a few blocks away, near the Olympic Stadium, by another officer in another cruiser. “He says to me, 'You coasted through a stop sign,'” Menscik said. They were slapped with a second $162-ticket. Then, as they were about to enter the stadium's parking garage, the same officer intercepted them again for allegedly going through another stop sign. Menscik and Guy insist they respected the traffic signs and they don't think the tickets are coincidences. “I think it went [further] than that, at that point, because of the Ontario plates,” said Menscik, adding that they will contest the fines.
  3. There was another thread with an old picture of a Citroen DS parked next to the Sun Life building, circa 1971. I forget the thread though. Here's an ad with the same car driving around Montreal! The license plate looks like a 1968 Quebec plate (white on blue). It sure doesn't look like any 1970's plate, and DS/Citroen Canada stopped around 1974... Another one but less memorable city views:
  4. jesseps

    Road rage

    Worst thing on the planet. That is one of the main reasons why I do not drive in this city. I swear, if it happens again. I am going to register for a handgun. If anyone see's a black Madza 3 on the left side backdoor (window) with Zoo York on it. Also it has an Albi Mazda sticker on the back of the car, can't remember which side though. Please take down the license plate and send it to me. Thanks. I'd probably feel safer in Israel then here.
  5. Un autre article faisant l'éloge de la gastronomie montréalaise Hungering for beauty and the bistros The Boston Globe La tire, maple syrup frozen on a stick, for sale at Marche Atwater. (Jonathan Levitt for the Boston Globe) By Jonathan Levitt Globe Correspondent / May 4, 2008 Interstate 89 north of Burlington, Vt., is as big, remote, and windswept as the Western plains. I cross the Canadian border at Highgate and drive through the flatness, past miles of tidy dairy farms - pert suburban-type houses with barns and cows in back - and keep going over the Saint Lawrence River, looking down to spot Leonard Cohen's "Suzanne" and her gypsy cabin, but she's long gone. Then there it is, the island of Montreal, and at the base of Mount Royal, the skyscrapers, just a few, but tall, and huddled together. Like most big cities in Canada, Montreal feels like one last great human place before the bleakness of the northern wilderness. At Hotel St-Paul in Old Montreal, I stare at the manicured cedar bushes and the 1900 Beaux Arts façade, then walk into the lobby, past the Spanish alabaster fireplace to the front desk. Everyone who works here looks younger than 30. With the key I go upstairs and into my room with the low-slung bed, faux fur throw, ebony-stained wood floors, and view of another Beaux Arts building across the street with a giant perfectly accurate clock. I take off my shoes, turn on the flat-screen television, and watch "The Age of Innocence" dubbed into French, and I nap. When I wake up it is still light out. The streets of Old Montreal are hushed and narrow. It's the oldest part of the city, along the river, and near the original French settlement of 1642. In the twilight it's easy to imagine fur traders and Iroquois attacks. I wander through Chinatown and across rue Sainte-Catherine with its grime and strip clubs, and accidentally make eye contact with some "Mad Max Beyond Thunderdome" punks. They are begging and drumming, exotic with tattooed faces, dreadlocks, and big handsome dogs. The last time I walked around Montreal it was January and so cold that inside my coat pockets I wore socks on my hands. But now it's April and sunny and 60 degrees, and at the outdoor cafes it looks as if everyone pretty shoved off early from work to eat and smoke and drink cold beer. On Duluth Street in the middle of the flat, graffiti-clad Plateau neighborhood I stop for dinner at Au Pied de Cochon. P.D.C., as it is known, is a former wood-fired brick-oven pizza place converted into a temple of excess and neo-Quebecois peasant food by celebrity chef Martin Picard. I order venison steak frites. On the walls are jars of preserved summer tomatoes, and in the bathroom, a showerhead for a sink faucet, and a bucket of beer on ice by the toilet. It's early but crowded. Word has gotten out because the food press seems to write about the place every few weeks. But it still feels like a chummy club, and every portion could serve two or more. Picard is giant, hairy, balding, and looks like Shrek. The fries come fried in duck fat with a side of good mayonnaise; the venison steak is smothered in a rich jus with mushrooms and caramelized onions. On the plate is a cartoon of Picard, wearing a tall chef's hat, riding a pig or a shrimp, depending on the plate. After dinner I walk and walk, then wander into the bistro next to the hotel. It's called Restaurant Holder, and the music sounds like the soundtrack to a video game. They've stopped serving real food, so I order the Quebec cheese plate and eat lots of baguette. Benedictine monks make one of the cheeses, and it tastes like cleaning out the chicken coop, but in a good way. For breakfast I walk down St-Paul Street to the bakery Olive + Gourmando where, once again, everyone is beautiful. They are carrying yoga mats and ordering coffee and pastries like almond croissants and apple tarts that look too good to be real, and so I order the same. By now I am certain that the food here is better than back home, better than the over-hyped poutine, those french fries soaked in gravy and studded with cheese curds for which Quebec is known. So I think only of food and have lunch at L'Express, a bistro that has been in the same place on rue St-Denis for almost 30 years. I order duck confit on greens and frites with mustardy mayonnaise. The waitress brings a crunchy baguette and a jar of even crunchier cornichons to grab with worn wooden tongs. There is white paper on top of the marble tabletop. The duck skin stays crispy and is the prettiest golden brown. L'Express is as reserved as Au Pied de Cochon is boisterous. The bill comes on a tin plate. It seems like a good bistro can be like a diner, like a place to go every day, a kitchen away from home. And so I go to another bistro, the restaurant Leméac, at the base of the mountain, and this one is much more posh. I get the veal a la Lyonnaise, which is just a fancy way of saying liver and onions. Now it's late, and I'm tired, but I poke my head into Garde Manger, a new place people are raving about, but all I see are rich kids with their cocktails and lobster poutine, so I go back to the hotel and fall asleep in front of the TV. In the next morning's cold rain, la tire, maple syrup frozen on a stick at Marché Atwater, makes for a smoky sugar high of a breakfast. Marché Atwater is the smaller and more expensive of the city's two public markets. Afterward, I wander around the cleaned up and condo-fied, but still gritty, St-Henri neighborhood until it's dinnertime and time to go to Restaurant Joe Beef. The place is named for Charles McKiernan (1835-89), the inn and tavern keeper nicknamed Joe Beef because of his knack for rounding up meat and provisions for hungry fellow soldiers during the Crimean War. The legend goes that McKiernan kept wild animals - black bears, monkeys, wildcats, a porcupine, and an alligator - in the basement of the tavern and brought them up for entertainment and to restore order at the bar. When he died the animals were in his funeral procession. Joe Beef preserves the innkeeper's outlaw attitude and supposedly his bathroom door. At the bar, John Bil from Prince Edward Island shucks oysters. He is a Canadian shucking champion and an elite marathon runner. He feeds me oysters and bourbon until chef-owner Frédéric Morin brings out the deep-fried white bait with tartar sauce, and the whole king crab, and more bourbon. Then we go next door to Liverpool House, a quirky sort of Italian/French/Quebecois place that Morin also owns, and we eat black pudding with foie gras and ribs braised in Dr. Pepper. Morin makes rum punch and brings out a cheese plate with warm green grapes. The restaurant closes and I follow the cooks to their favorite dive bar, and after it closes, I go along to their favorite diner where just before dawn I have a plate of poutine, soggy and wonderful. Jonathan Levitt, a freelance writer in Maine, can be reached at [email protected]
  6. EQ3 has launched in Montreal I have been a fan of EQ3 for a while but with no store in the town where I am living, I was more an observer than a participant. Until now! Yesterday, on my way out of Ze Apéro Montreal event, I spot the front window of EQ3 just in front of Meat Market. That is a lot of unfamiliar names for people that do not reside in Montreal. Ze Apéro is a monthly happy hour gathering for the young professional jungle of Montreal. Meat Market is a hip meat restaurant bar. EQ3 provides affordable furniture and home décor accessories to modern design conscious consumers. Tableware and barware collections There are many things that you can grab for your next party. Start with the latest SCRIPT clear glassware collection with its golden shapes. These types of glass plates are all the rage over the last year or two. The trend does not really died since designers always invent new patterns for several brands. That is how this idea is kept fresh. The latest by EQ3 are the KHOKHLOMA Plates. The color palette feels very autumnal. A sense of refinement and coolness emerge from the WILA Plate Set of three different sizes and the original WILA Fruit Tray. They are simple enough to not steal the show to the food but the design is strong enough to make a statement by itself. The REPLAY Ottoman Tray is a product that has a few years in age but that I feel as aged well. Maybe it is because I always wanted one but it does not fit my décor right now. I will show you soon some inspiration pictures by EQ3 for Holiday decoration and gift ideas. I know it is too early to think about Christmas decorating but what I have to show you deserve it. It has entertaining in style written all over it. Address of the new Montreal EQ3 Store: 4428 Boulevard Saint-Laurent | Montreal, QC H2W 1Z5 T 514.982.9992 Where to find EQ3? EQ3 showrooms are located across Canada in Vancouver, Calgary, Winnipeg, Toronto, London, Ottawa, Burlington and Montreal. EQ3 is a Canadian brand that introduced an innovative and affordable furniture concept with an European design flair. This is the best alternative to IKEA. In the United States, EQ3 stores can be found in the San Francisco Bay Area, Los Angeles, Grand Rapids, Richmond, Norfolk, Charlotte and Phoenix, amongst other locations. Sourcing: Glassware: SCRIPT Decanter at EQ3 - price: $24.99 Glassware: SCRIPT DOF whiskey / juice glass at EQ3 - price: $6.99 each Serving ware: KHOKHLOMA Plate at EQ3 – starting at $14.99 for the small Serving ware: WILA Plate Set - price: $79.99 CAD for a set of 3 plates Serving ware: WILA Fruit Tray at EQ3 – price: $84.99 CAD Home decor: REPLAY Ottoman Tray at EQ3 – price: $79 CAD Find a shop: Store locator of EQ3
  7. http://www.mondev.ca/condo-for-sale-montreal/Plateau-Mont-Royal/QUARTIER+ST-DENIS-+28+NEW+CONDOS+IN+THE+PLATEAU/ - St-Denis and Ste-Gregoire, 3 floors. - 28-unit condos and lofts. - Ready: Fall 2015 Yet another project by Mondev, plate plate plate, yawwwwwwwn, if these guys were to be just a tiny bit more creative, with some minimal architectural effort, something distinctive!!! They could change the face of Montréal with the amount of construction they have at the moment, but as long as it sells, they will keep that recipe. That's unfortunate.
  8. (Courtesy of the Montreal Gazette) I have been wanting to check this place out for 3-4 years now, I should totally go now.