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Found 12 results

  1. http://9to5google.com/2011/09/22/google-becomes-a-virtual-mobile-network-operator-in-spain-rest-of-europe-coming-soon/ It be interesting to see them come here and become an MVNO with one of the carriers here and maybe even start up their own ISP.
  2. Yesterday Rogers rolled out new data plans for use in Canada/US. 500 MB @ $35 1 GB @ $40 Plus it comes different forms of payment: monthly, 1 year, 2 year and 3 year. I might finally get data on my phone. It seems worth it.
  3. jesseps

    Rogers Vision

    Anyone try it out? Rant: I just wish we could sort of get a decent rate for surfing the net with our phone. One thing I noticed that the Vision (3G) is on the same network at the wireless internet (pc cards) or so I think. 1GB for $65. Something similar for consumers and not business oriented people, probably cost over $500. Plus 1GB surfing on the phone seems reasonable, it is like 30 MB a day for about $2.
  4. Anyone here ever have Mormons (Church of Jesus Christ of Later-Day Saints) try and recruit them? Talk about awkward. I was walking along a random street in Greenfield Park, when suddenly two young women approach me (one of them was kind of hot, LMAO). They gave me a warm greeting as if they knew who I was (I was trying to figure out who these people were). Anyways, they start asking me if I believe in God. I told them I did, and that I was a non-practicing Presbyterian. Then they tried to "build on" that. They started rambling about the modern prophets after Jesus' death up until 400 AD. Then they started talking about the Book of Mormon (claiming it to be something like a Third Testament). This sort of thing went on for a while (I was kind of smirking the whole time, but perhaps they took this as a positive sign). Then they wanted to set up an appointment to convert me to Mormonism. They wanted to meet at my house, or over coffee (I thought Mormons weren't allowed to drink coffee???). Fortunatley I did not agree to set an appointment. I compromised and took one of their cards which they wrote their phone number on, "In case I changed my mind". Talk about awkward. If it had been a two guys I might have ended the conversation sooner, but when an attractive young woman enthusiastically wants to talk to you, you don't exactly want to end the conversation then and there. Part of me wants to meet them to try and debate them, because I do find history/theology/philosophy can be a little interesting. However, the rational side of my brain is scared of being sucked into this peculiar religion, which I perceive to be something of a cult. I know I sure as hell don't want to be wandering around finding new recruits.
  5. Cellcom Israel $71 USD/month (270 shekels) Unlimited incoming calls from Anywhere Unlimited incoming SMS (not sure if that includes Canada) Unlimited Data (GPRS only) could be 3G True I had no idea if this includes call display or whatever Thing is I just have to pay local rates for calls within Israel. Honestly why can't any service provider do that in Canada. We have more people for the love of god! I have a feeling I'll be using a lot of MSN Messenger on my phone. Seeing I know no one will SMS me or even call lol
  6. http://www.newswire.ca/news-releases/nobel-reit-is-moving-downtown-montreal-577586241.html 2016 /CNW Telbec/ - (TSXV: NEL.UN) Nobel Real Estate Investment Trust (the "REIT" or "Nobel REIT") is pleased to announce that it is moving its head office into its most recent acquisition located at 2045 Stanley in Downtown Montreal. Our offices are therefore closed today for the move; they will reopen in our new premises on Monday May 2nd. The REIT will then be reachable again at its new phone number, 514-840-9339.
  7. Old Damascus is quite unique, it is enclosed by very high walls and it can only be accessed by very few doors ( i believe 7 of them). Streets are never wider than the width of two cars, and most of them are unmapped and wide enough for one person to pass. Old Damascus is composed of a good sized Christian Minority, and you can find packed Churches on Sundays and other Holidays. Old Damascus is the heart of the oldest still inhabited city in the world, Damascus goes back to over 4000 years before Christ. So I'm not going to spoil any surprises, check the pics and some commentaries... i tried to be as concise as possible, but if you do have questions, just ask. If you haven't checked the first part: Going to Old Damascus There's no detached houses in Damascus, its all 3-4-5 stories with no elevator. Thats why you don't see many fat Syrians :-) The almighty Minister of Finance... aka Mafia. My host in his '78 Mercedes annoyed by my too many pics... he hasn't seen nothing yet. The usual 3 lanes become 6 lanes traffic in Syria. More fountains... Notice the fruits on the left, that guy makes amazing fresh pressed juice... I was always having one too... 25sp or 50 cents. That's the most important commercial street in Damascus, the mazout deliverer and his horse perfectly blend. The almighty Commercial Bank of Syria... the biggest fiasco I've ever witnessed in my life... it takes maybe 5 or 6 signatures to cash in a regular cheque (45 minutes)... to bad I couldn't take any pics inside. A roundabout, very common. Another common sight... ok maybe not, a fellah wit his lamb :-) A vestige of old railroad tracks. Thats a movie theatre... look at those sexy women. BTW, going to the movies in Syria is seen as a bad thing by the masses. A viaduc. Thats the old central station. Good luck in getting in. Can't remember what was that building. Thats the telegraph and communication central... if you want a phone line, you go there. (the waiting list for a phone line was so long that we got it nearly 10 years after we already moved to Canada) Market (Souq) al-Hamidiyya and Roman ruins So we wanted to visit Al Hamidiyya, unique I confess, and encolsed in Old Damascus. These are the walls of Old Damascus. Thats the new part of the markt... not intresting. That guy on the left doesn't seem to like being taken in a picture :-) Here we are... it is encolsed by roof. This is the prime spot of the Sook (which spans on many many blocks). Secondary streets where the sook spans.
  8. (Courtesy of Public Mobile) Thing is they are going to use CDMA G-Band. They are targeting the 38% of Canadians who do not have mobile phones. Seems interesting. Only way this can work if their plans are like $10/month or something.
  9. jesseps

    Nexus One

    I can't wait to get mine (had to ship it to Vermont) LOL Only reason I got this baby is Android 2.1. I never use data on my phone, I'll still be using wifi. Even if I wanted to use data on my phone the 3G wont work until Videotron launches in the summer with their AWS spectrum. Specs It does suck that it doesn't have multitouch, but the voice command feature pretty interesting to say the least. I should hopefully be reviewing the phone, days after receiving it. The competition in some way or another... Nokia N900 (3G AWS w/QWERTY) Sony X10 (3G w/o QWERTY exclusive to Rogers in 2Q10) iPhone 3GS (3G w/o QWERTY supported by multiple carriers) Motorola Droid / Milestone (3G AWS w/QWERTY) Blackberry Storm2 (3G AWS w/QWERTY) One main advantage I see with Nexus One the use of AMOLED. Only other phone from HTC that has it is Bravo. Only other manufacture that uses is AMOLED is Samsung. 3G AWS only works with WIND and soon DAVE (both are excluded from QC). Come on Videotron (summer). One thing LG came out with the EVE which is sold exclusively with Rogers at the moment. LG also working now on EVE2 which the specs will rival Nexus One, seeing Qualcomm Snapdragon processing speed at 1 GHz. One thing Apple has an advantage with ARM processors seeing they can handle 2 GHz (supposedly), time will only tell when they release their new generation iPhone in 2010. One advantage that Nexus One has right now is with the WiFi 802.11n
  10. http://www.citylab.com/navigator/2016/02/should-the-law-step-in-to-outlaw-pedestrian-cellphone-use/462669/?utm_source=SFFB From The Atlantic CityLab Officials Keep Trying, and Failing, to Outlaw Distracted Walking A proposed bill in Hawaii is the latest in a doomed line of legislative attempts to deal with pedestrians on their cell phones. EILLIE ANZILOTTI @eillieanzi Feb 15, 2016 4 Comments Image Lori Foxworth/Flickr Lori Foxworth/Flickr You’d be hard-pressed to find anyone who’d say that texting and walking mix well. New York’s (sadly fictitious) Department of Pedestrian Etiquette listed “walking with your face in a map or mobile device,” among its violations. Beyond the annoyance factor, it’s a health risk: 2010 data show that at least 1,500 people a year wound up in the emergency room after taking to the streets on their phones. The Pew Research Center has found that 53 percent of adult cell phone users have bumped into something as a result of distracted walking. And if you still don’t see the hazard, consider the La Crescenta, California, man who nearly texted himself straight into a bear. Yet people keep doing it. And when common sense fails, the law steps in. Or, at least, tries to. A bill introduced in the Hawaii House of Representatives at the end of January would ban pedestrians from crossing a street, road, or highway while using a mobile electronic device. The House Committee on Transportation deferred the bill on Wednesday, bringing to mind a similar ban proposed by the Honolulu City Council in 2011, which never reached approval. Legislative attempts to curtail pedestrian cellphone use do not have very successful track record. Carl Kruger, a former state senator from New York, introduced a proposal in 2007 that would have barred the use of electronics in intersections at the risk of a $100 fine. “Government has an obligation to protect its citizenry,” he said. The bill failed. Similarly, a 2011 Arkansas proposal to outlaw wearing headphones in both ears while walking went nowhere. (Studies have shown that, relative to texting, music isn’t even that great of a distraction.) Jimmy Jeffres, the senator behind the bill, knew it wouldn’t pass but introduced it anyway to raise awareness of the issue. "You might not get the full effect of the Boston Symphony Orchestra with one ear,” he told the Associated Press, “but you at least will be aware of your surroundings." Those lackluster outcomes didn’t stop the Utah Transit Authority from trying to slap a $50 fee on pedestrians using their phones, headphones, and other devices while crossing Salt Lake City’s light rail tracks in 2012. But the ordinance never became statewide law. Craig Frank, a Republican representative who opposed the bill, said at the time: “I never thought the government needed to cite me for using my cellphone in a reasonable manner.” (AP Photo/Ben Margot) Distracted driving laws have had a considerably easier time making it through the legislature; 46 states ban texting and 14 ban hand-held phone use entirely. But attempts to monitor how people conduct themselves while walking (or, for that matter, riding a bike) frustrate safety advocates who view pedestrians and cyclists as the most vulnerable city street users. Numerous states have proposed public awareness campaigns to direct pedestrian attention away from their phone screens and back toward their livelihoods; California’s 2014 campaign implores: “Stay Alert. Stay Alive.” Some researchers have become doubtful that such campaigns can work. Corey Basch of William Patterson University, co-author of a recent report on pedestrian distractedness at five Manhattan intersection, found that “Don’t Walk” signs failed to affect those distracted by their devices; nearly half of observed walkers who crossed against the light were looking at their phones, putting them at a greater risk, she said, than those who were paying attention to their surroundings. Consequently, she’s not sure pedestrians would heed—let alone notice—additional signage encouraging them to watch out for themselves. “The urgency to always be in touch and the fear of missing out on something has grown so strong I'm not even sure they're aware of how dangerous it is," Basch told NJ.com. sent via Tapatalk
  11. Ça s'est vu avec les autos et la locations d'appartement sur les sites de petites annonces, mais les fraudeurs s'essayent avec la vente de maisons et de condos maintenant. Ils vont jusqu'à monter de faux cabinets d'avocats pour inciter les acheteurs éventuels à leur laisser de grosses sommes d'argent... via CBC Fake real estate ads prey on buyer desire for home deal Police say fraudulent websites targeting potential renters more common than scams to sell homes CBC News Posted: Dec 02, 2013 5:00 AM ET Last Updated: Dec 02, 2013 9:50 AM ET An Ottawa woman says she was shocked to learn the condo she was selling online was also being offered on another website at a deeply discounted price, part of a complicated scam targeting unsuspecting homebuyers. Julie Gutteridge is selling her upscale downtown Ottawa condo for about $260,000, and placed ads with real estate website Grapevine and online classified advertiser Kijiji. She then noticed a nearly identical ad — with the same digital photos she had used on her advertisement — on another real estate website. The one difference: the price. The clone ad listed the condo for $108,000. "I was shocked... because I first heard of it, then I got an email from just a person that had noticed the two listings," said Gutteridge. "They actually used the same description that was on Grapevine. Not only the pictures of my unit, but the same description, address, everything but the unit number ... and of course the contact information," she said. Police investigators have seen a number of fraudulent websites targeting potential home renters, particularly people coming from far-away cities. But for someone to attempt to sell a home that he or she doesn't own is rare and particularly involved. Buyer pressured to close sale quickly "This is fairly elaborate, going to the point of setting up false law firm websites," said Sgt. Mike Noonan with Ottawa police's organized fraud section. "They are duplicating the ad, but drastically reducing the asking price, and that's what seems to jump out at legitimate homebuyers. They see, 'Wow, look at the price of that home and it looks good,'" said Noonan. The key to the confidence game is a reliance on both the desire of a homebuyer to get a good deal, and pressure from the supposed seller to close the deal quickly, says Noonan. CBC Ottawa's Simon Gardner learned this first-hand when he called the number on a duplicate advertisement for a different home — in Orleans, and listed in a duplicate ad for $129,000, or less than half the actual price. Gardner identified himself as "Andrew Gardner" and created a plausible back story after CBC News determined a journalist would be unable to understand how the seller's operation worked if he called and represented himself as such. The man who picked up the phone identified himself as Paul — a name CBC News assumed was fake — and said he couldn't meet Gardner in person because he was in Toronto with clients. He claimed he was selling the home at a discounted price because he was under financial stress and needed money fast, but offered assurances that the home had not been a grow-op. "Actually we do need some money urgently and there is no lien on the house, the house is paid for and it's going really quick. I have a couple of other interested buyers," Paul said. He said in order to close the deal, Gardner would have to deposit $12,000 in a bank account. The man then said his lawyer would contact Gardner with details about the transaction. The man also provided a link to the website of a Toronto law firm specializing in real estate. Law firm not recognized by law society Checks with the Law Society of Ontario reveal the firm doesn't exist, and the phone numbers listed on the website are not active. But nevertheless, Gardner was sent official-looking purchase documents asking him to wire his deposit into a Royal Bank account in Brampton, Ont. The account does exist, but it is unclear whether the account holder is involved or is an unwitting victim in a confidence scam. Noonan said tracking the suspected scammer is difficult, particularly if operating outside Canada. "The internet service providers, we don't seem to be able to track down. Our suspicion is that it's not even originating from within Canada and with a money wire service. Once that money leaves the country, it can be retrieved anywhere in the world," he said. Gardner made repeated efforts to meet with Paul, as well as his lawyer, to try to close the transaction in person, but was met with a series of excuses. After weeks of back-and-forth emails, text messages and phone calls, Gardner identified himself as a reporter and said he was investigating a potential real estate scam. 'How do you sell a house you don't own?' "What scam is that, I don't get you," Paul replied. "Well, let me ask you," said Gardner. "How do you sell a house you don't own?" At that point, the phone went dead, and Gardner received a text a short time later. "Nice try Andrew (Simon) you are a good scam baiter," the text read. "Pls lets drop everything. I am leaving this stupid job. I got forced into this lifestyle." It's not known if anyone has fallen for this kind of fraud, but Gutteridge feels it may already have hurt her chances of selling her place. "They may assume what I have on Grapevine is a scam or [may] not be comfortable moving forward with anything," she said. Noonan said homebuyers should be wary of suspiciously low price homes when the supposed seller never has time to meet. As for home sellers, he said the best you can do is keep an eye on real estate websites to ensure your ad hasn't been duplicated.
  12. no-photoshop either They look so unrealistic