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Found 11 results

  1. Mark is probably the best person to answer this question. Is TK limited to 3x weekly at YUL? or is that just the airlines choice. What does the future hold for them at YUL?
  2. I do research at the UQAM science campus and sometimes I see candy wrappers, party-invitation fliers, or pieces of paper on the floor in the halls inside the buildings. This is explained by the large amount of students walking those halls every day, and by the presence of vending machines. This doesn't bother me a lot and I normally just pick them up and put them in the garbage. As you probably know, however, they are extremely dangerous, and the probability of someone slipping is much higher than you would imagine (the chance of someone actually falling is probably not very high but that's another subject, since it has already became a safety issue). A few days ago I saw a sign by the door of an office that read "SAFETY FIRST: NO LITTERING IN THIS AREA." The sign is still there. I found it interesting for various reasons: 1) It was in English (besides the occasional ironic science-related comic strip on the wall by the doors of some professors, I never see anything in English at UQAM). 2) It tackled littering in a complete different manner than the usual "it looks bad." 3) It is the first time I see a sign tackling littering in Montreal, and I think Quebec in general, and it was not official in any way! It was not even in French! (wait, now that I remember there are some signs that look like they haven't been changed since the 60s behind some alleys, and there is those posters that didn't seem to have worked). 4) This sign seemed to have worked. Now I don't know about (4) because it might be that the person who put up the sign had been picking up candy wrappers out of safety concern. But it would have definitely worked for me (if I were among the ones who litter), since the consequence on my actions suddenly goes from annoying some people to possibly killing a person. Anyway I just realized I don't really have a conclusion for this post so I'm gonna try to wrap it up... A while ago I saw a TED lecture by an advertising man on changing the approach to give new value to existing products. I wonder if something similar could be done regarding littering. Would there be less littering if people saw it by default as a safety issue? It seems to me like changing the approach would work. Well I don't think there is any approach here anyway. Most people in Montreal would see me as a redneck for even worrying about littering.
  3. I'm starting this thread to inquire more about the relationship between the city of Montreal and the province of Quebec. Let me start with some of my observations. Having lived almost 6 years in this city it seems to me that people from Montreal are pretty much split into two categories: Those who consider themselves Quebeckers (mostly francophones) and those who consider themselves Montrealers (mostly anglophones). The former seem to know a lot about the history of Quebec, while the latter know that there used to be a famous restaurant where the Hotel St-Martin now stands, and are informed of at least one major urban development on the island. I find this division to be a bit dangerous, and very similar to the relationship between Quebec and the ROC, though in a smaller scale. During my time here I have come to understand a bit more the need for Quebec to separate from the ROC (almost every person from outside of Canada has been explained this conflict as a complete joke before coming here). However I feel that if Quebec were to leave Canada, the "Montrealers" I described above would not be very happy. Not because they consider themselves to be Canadian, but because they feel Quebec has never really cared about the problems of this city as much as a province is supposed to care about its largest and most important urban centre. Do my observations make sense to you guys?
  4. Deal Book If this did go through, I do wonder if NM would land up in Canada.
  5. Infographic: Every Person In The U.S. And Canada, On One Crazy, Zoomable Map FORGET LAKES, RIVERS, STATES, AND CAPITALS--THIS MAP JUST SHOWS PEOPLE. ALL OF 'EM. Most maps are curious combinations of the natural and the man-made, charts that show us the rivers, lakes, and mountains that have developed across millenia as well as the lines we humans have established, in much more recent history, to divide them all up. But this map by Brandon Martin-Anderson, a graduate student at MIT’s Changing Places lab, shows one thing and one thing only: people, as counted in the most recent U.S. and Canadian censuses. Martin-Anderson’s map (which is really worth a look in its full, zoomable glory) is dizzyingly dense, with some three hundred million data points, but it’s also exceedingly straightforward. One dot per person--nothing else. The designer says he got the idea when he was looking at a series of race and ethnicity dot density maps created by designer Eric Fischer. Curious about what his own neighborhood would look like in greater detail, he started plotting census data. "I started with the University District neighborhood in Seattle," he says, "but then I was curious about Seattle. Then I was curious about western Washington, then Washington, then the whole West Coast, then the U.S." At first glance, the picture it shows is understandable enough. Major cities are dense pockets of black, with more uninhabited white space cropping up as you move from east to west. But it’s remarkable just how pronounced that drop-off is moving from states like Minnesota, Iowa, and Missouri to the Dakotas, Nebraska, and Kansas, and the states beyond. As Martin-Anderson points out, that abrupt drop-off lines up neatly with the average precipitation experienced by those areas. "I love this a lot," he says, "because it illustrates the extent to which humans in large numbers act like something so simple and biological--like a field of grass growing under the reach of a sprinkler." Other observations from the mapmaker? For one thing, the map shows just how sparse northern Canada really is; 64% of the country’s population actually resides south of Seattle. It also illustrates some unique regional trends. The band of black along the Eastern Seaboard isn’t much of a surprise, but the metropolitan axis running from Atlanta to Raleigh-Durham is surprisingly dense. For Martin-Anderson, the process of making the map was also enlightening. Sifting through the census data, he found that the highest density blocks were prisons, dorms, barracks, homeless shelters, and luxury apartments. "It’s an extremely heterogeneous collection of outliers," he says. "People are prone to making politically charged statements about the goodness or badness of population density, but it’s very difficult to make any true and wide-reaching statements about areas with extremely high population density." But the project raises other questions still, mainly about the types of maps we make and use as a society. If the concept behind the dot-a-person map is so straightforward, and the results so insightful, why don’t we see them more often? The answer, says Martin-Anderson, can be traced to the fact that we’ve only recently become familiar with an easy-to-use tool for making sense of insanely dense, multi-scale maps: pinch-to-zoom. "I think designers are scared of overwhelming their users," he says, explaining the dearth of similar efforts until now. "Glancing around my computer’s screen right now I see maybe 3,000 characters of text or clickable regions--3,000 elements. The population map throws about 340 million objects at you at once, and I think most people’s intuition is that that’s just far too many things to display at once." But as we’ve all become masters of our maps apps, designers may need to change that assumption. "It’s super amazing how comfortable the average person is with zooming in and out of an image illustrating data with scale-free structure," the designer says. "I think it’s due to the tremendous amount of work that Apple and Google have done acclimating people to zooming. The majority of traffic to the map so far has been on devices where people are navigating through pinch-zoom. Point being: In the past, unfamiliarity and difficulty in zooming made scale-free graphics difficult, so designers either simplified them or ignored them. Now that people are used to zooming, we don’t have to make decisions for our users about where they should spend their attention. We can just give them everything at once." To test that theory for yourself, grab your iPad and check out the zoomable version of the map on Martin-Anderson’s site. http://bmander.com/dotmap/index.html Via : fastcodesign.com
  6. jesseps

    VISA Codesure

    <object width="640" height="385"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YX08fdvFwaM&hl=en_US&fs=1&"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YX08fdvFwaM&hl=en_US&fs=1&" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true" width="640" height="385"></embed></object> Pretty cool. I wonder if we will see this in the near future. RBC are releasing some or all of their new credit cards with to be used by PayWave systems, which is convenient, but does not make sense when you have chip&pin on the card to stop people from using it. Even with the chip&pin security, the card can still be entered manually and be used. One thing I would like for Canadian banks to start handing out security keys for bank accounts. Instead of having to update your password or remembering it when you go online. The key has a randomly generated password you need to use to access your account online. Only person I have seen something like that was my ex. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Security_token
  7. jesseps

    Shoes

    I know this is a weird topic but hey, it was bound to happen. At Cours Mont Royal, there is a new shoe store that opened up called Minelli from France. Its their first North American store, but it seems like its their first store in the Americas. If your looking for shoes, go check it out. The prices are reasonable (by my standards). I got a pair good quality leather shoes, that also have a leather sole and that are made in Portugal. Some other ones are made in Spain, Italy and maybe in France. The size range is from 40 to 45 (no half sizes). If I heard the sales person correctly, each size only gets 6 pairs. Honestly we finally have a middle market. No more looking at Aldo or Harry Rosen for shoes. :goodvibes:
  8. <object width="448" height="374"><embed src="http://www.worldstarhiphop.com/videos/e/16711680/wshhey87R36sC39KMzOs" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowfullscreen="true" width="448" height="374">How much time do you think the cabbie will serve? Seeing people who kill someone while driving drunk, in this province serve hardly anytime. More graphic video, has been posted below.</object>
  9. I just noticed on Fedex.com, my package is being shipped to somewhere with no address. I called up Fedex the person there was like please call BrightPoint. I did call BrightPoint, which transferred me to HTC, which told me to call Fedex back. Fedex again tried to change the address but couldn't and told me to contact BrightPoint to send them a fax for a change of address. I called BrightPoint and they said they can't do that seeing the product in transit. Called up Fedex again to tell them what was going on. One person said I need a utility bill to pick up the package in Burlington, VT which doesn't make sense the package has no address. Another person said I can pick it up with my Passport even if I am Canadian and another person said it might just go back to BrightPoint thats in Indiana. Again I called up HTC which they tried to resolve the issue and another issue came up, they can't access my order. Plus I also called up CIBC Visa. They can't do anything about lost packages other than they can refund me for the cost of the package. All this in 2 hours. Funny thing is... I asked for ground delivery and they gave me ground delivery home service, even though I am delivering it to a business. Even if they had the address on the package, they would be trying to deliver it to a business on Saturday thats not open. Thing is I some how managed to find out what trailer my package is on So I guess can try and hijack the Fedex trailer
  10. After having a terrible time trying to find a good apartment Downtown that is not taken by someone in person immediately after I inquire about it, I am considering renting in Verdun, near De L'Eglise metro. Judging by street view, Wellington street is a smaller (and probably cleaner) version of Mont-Royal avenue. I basically have three questions: Are there any 24-hour coffee shops around? Is it as safe as, say, Downtown? How is commuting from there? Feel free to answer any other question that I didn't ask. Thanks a lot!
  11. Mukesh Ambani - $63.2 billion * Carlos Slim Helu - $62.2993 billion * William (Bill) Gates - $62.29 billion * Warren Buffett - $55.9 billion * Lakshmi Mittal - $50.9 billion Read