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Found 9 results

  1. Why does montreal have worse roads than any other north american city? If climate really plays a role, why does ottawa or toronto have much smoother roads with a nicer texture and color, other than the newly repaved hwy 40, i don't think there is a single nice road in this city, i am very cautious while i drive around i just never know what's on the way, i own a brand new car which i paid alot for and i keep fealing that these roads will destroy the suspension components prematurely. Will there ever be a solution for this problem? I mean even brand new pavement is usualy wavy and unproportionate and ends up looking just as bad as before after 2-3 years Oh and i'm new here! Hi everyone
  2. Canada falls behind in basic worker benefits: McGill study Doesn't measure up to other countries on sick leave, vacation time and breastfeeding breaks MIKE KING, The Gazette Published: 6 hours ago mike king the gazette Canada is perennially a top-10 finisher in United Nations rankings as one of the best countries in the world to live in. But a new McGill University study indicates that Canada lags behind many other countries on some basic worker benefits. The school's Institute for Health and Social Policy conducted recently an international survey that is the first research of its type to measure Canadian laws and practices vs. those of 180 other countries in such areas as maternity leave, annual paid vacations, sick leave and breaks for breastfeeding mothers. The Work Equity Canada (WECan) index, conducted by the institute's Jody Heymann, Martine Chaussard and Megan Gerecke, found Canada scores well for having policies that guarantee paid leave to care for dependents with serious illnesses. But Canada fared worse in other areas. The 78-page report notes: - In nearly 90 other countries, workers are guaranteed three weeks or more of paid leave a year, while most Canadian workers with a year's tenure are guaranteed only two. In Ontario, Prince Edward Island and the Yukon, even workers with long service are guaranteed just two weeks of vacation. - At least 156 countries provide leave for sick workers, 81 of them offering full wage replacement. Canada guarantees just more than half as much, 55 per cent of insurable income, with most provinces and territories not guaranteeing job protection during leaves of more than 12 days. - More than 100 countries officially provide new mothers in the formal workforce with complete wage replacement during maternity leave. Most women in Canada are only guaranteed 55 per cent of their insurable income during maternity leave. Quebec is the exception, with women receiving 70 to 75 per cent of their insured income. - Since breastfeeding has been proven to dramatically reduce illness and death among infants and toddlers, 114 countries have laws guaranteeing women the right to a break to breastfeed at work. Not a single province guarantees the same benefit. On leave for dependents with serious illnesses, Canada is one of 39 countries with such leaves with pay and among them one of only 16 Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development members making the guarantee. Institute director Heymann notes there's a wide variation in laws and practices from province to province, especially when it comes to helping parents handle pregnancy and childbirth. "Quebec offers parents more choice, higher wage replacement rates and five weeks paternity leave for men's exclusive use," Heymann said. "In addition, Quebec allows self-employed workers to opt out into parental benefits," she added. "No such provisions exist for self-employed workers in the rest of Canada" - a group that makes up 15 per cent of the employed workforce. René Roy, secretary-general of the Quebec Federation of Labour, said he's studying the McGill report and isn't ready yet to comment on it. To view the full report, visit http://www.mcgill.ca/ihsp [email protected]
  3. Quebec Tories swapped ad expenses, Elections Canada alleges TIM NAUMETZ The Canadian Press July 22, 2008 at 9:26 AM EDT OTTAWA — The Conservative Party shifted thousands of dollars in advertising expenses from two of its top Quebec candidates to other Quebec candidates who had more spending room in their 2006 federal election campaigns, the lawyer for Elections Canada has suggested. A former financial officer for the party confirmed last month in a court examination that expenses incurred by Public Works Minister Christian Paradis and former foreign affairs minister Maxime Bernier were assigned to other candidates. But former chief financial officer Ann O'Grady said the expenses were “prorated” to the other candidates because the firm that placed the television and radio ads billed Mr. Paradis and Mr. Bernier for higher amounts than their campaign agents originally committed. Elections Canada lawyer Barbara McIsaac probed Ms. O'Grady over records involving an eventual claim for $20,000 in radio and TV advertising by Mr. Paradis and $5,000 in advertising claimed by Mr. Bernier. The financial statements and invoices – filed in a Federal Court case concerning $1.3-million in questionable Conservative ad expenses – also showed that Mr. Bernier and Mr. Paradis paid a fraction of the ad production costs compared with other Tory candidates. Mr. Bernier and Mr. Paradis are among 67 Conservative candidates whose advertising expenditures are under investigation by the federal elections commissioner. Agents for some of the candidates took Chief Electoral Officer Marc Mayrand to Federal Court after he refused last year to reimburse the expenditures on grounds that they did not qualify as local candidate expenses. The Commons ethics committee is also conducting an inquiry into the bookkeeping, which Elections Canada alleges allowed the Conservative party to exceed its national campaign spending limit by more than $1-million. The Canada Elections Act prohibits candidates from absorbing or sharing the election expenses of other candidates. NDP MP Pat Martin, a member of the ethics committee, said if the party did shift expenses from Mr. Bernier and Mr. Paradis to other candidates it would add an entirely new dimension to the controversy. “I can't get (fellow NDP MP) Judy Wasylycia-Leis to put $5,000 of my expenses into her expenses,” Mr. Martin said. “That's absolutely not allowed.” In a sworn cross-examination last month, the transcript of which was subsequently entered in the Federal Court file, Ms. McIsaac pressed Ms. O'Grady about advertising and ad production costs that were transferred from Mr. Bernier and Mr. Paradis to other candidates. Ms. McIsaac challenged Ms. O'Grady's explanations that the expenditures were reassigned because the candidates had been mistakenly invoiced for more than the amounts their official agents originally committed for the campaign. “I'm going to suggest to you that Mr. Bernier was less than $2,590 from his spending limit and that he couldn't afford to put the additional amount into his return,” Ms. McIsaac said to Ms. O'Grady. “That would be total supposition,” Ms. O'Grady responded. “Who knows what else would have been going on at the time? I can't comment on how Mr. Bernier ran his campaign.” In the case of Mr. Paradis, Ms. O'Grady conceded that the candidate had originally committed his campaign to a media buy totalling $30,000, was eventually invoiced $29,766 and subsequently received a “credit note” of $10,000 that was reallocated to another candidate, Marc Nadeau. “Now, again, the reason for this was that Mr. Paradis had reached his limit with respect to spending as well, is that correct?” Ms. McIsaac asked. “He had to allocate some of his money to Mr. Nadeau, did he not, because he was close to his limit?” “I would not know that,” replied Ms. O'Grady, who replaced former Tory chief financial agent Susan Kehoe several months after the election. Ms. McIsaac also questioned Ms. O'Grady over the fact that Mr. Bernier paid no production costs for his share of the advertising. Mr. Paradis paid only $233.93 for his share, even though Ms. McIsaac said other candidates paid $4,500 each for production costs.
  4. jesseps

    Gst

    January 1st it goes down to 5%. Currently we pay 13.95%. As of January 1st it be 12.875%. I remember if it was just yesterday, when we paid 15.025%. All we have to do is twiddle our thumbs, when we see the price change on the products, because of the high dollar.
  5. GDS

    Tuition 2008

    2007/2008 2008/2009 Canada $4,558 $4,724 Newfoundland and Labrador $2,632 $2,632 Prince Edward Island $4,440 $4,530 Nova Scotia $6,110 $5,932 New Brunswick $5,590 $5,590 Quebec $2,056 $2,167 Ontario $5,388 $5,643 Manitoba $3,271 $3,276 Saskatchewan $5,015 $5,015 Alberta $5,122 $5,361 British Columbia $4,922 $5,040 Undergrad tuition rises to average of $4,724 a year: StatsCan CBC News Full-time Canadian undergraduate students paid an average of $4,724 in tuition for the 2008/2009 academic year, an increase of 3.6 per cent over the previous year, Statistics Canada said Thursday. The rise, which follows on the heels of a 2.8 per cent increase in the 2007/2008 academic year, was especially prominent in Quebec, Ontario, Alberta, British Columbia and Prince Edward Island. Fees held steady in Newfoundland and Labrador, New Brunswick, Manitoba and Saskatchewan, and dropped in Nova Scotia. Despite the drop in Nova Scotia — the result of the implementation of the Nova Scotia University Student Bursary Trust in March 2008 — students paid the highest fees anywhere in Canada: $5,932. Quebec ($2,167) and Newfoundland and Labrador ($2,632) had the lowest tuition fees. Statistics Canada analysts were at pains to point out that the average annual increase over the last decade has outpaced the consumer price index. The CPI is a way of measuring the cost of items purchased by a typical Canadian in any given month, and includes shelter, food, entertainment, fuel and transportation. In the last 10 years, tuition has increased annually an average of 4.4 per cent — it was $3,064 in 1998/1999. In contrast, the CPI rose at an annual average rate of 2.3 per cent. Meanwhile, tuition fees for full-time undergraduate international students increased 3.9 per cent on average to $14,495 compared to the previous year. Canadian graduate students paid 3.3 per cent more for tuition than a year earlier, with an average of $5,777 in fees this fall. Tuition fees don't include additional compulsory fees, such as those for athletics, student health services and student associations, which increased 3.3 per cent from a year earlier. On average, Canadian undergraduate students paid $695 in additional compulsory fees in 2008/2009, up from $673 a year earlier.
  6. :confused: The product I subscribed to a while back was this: http://whitecapresearch.com/ I barely used them, its nice that I am getting a refund but it be nice to know why
  7. Renduring Completed Built: 2006 Its on the McGill campus. Matrox, President paid $10 million to cover part of the costs.