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Found 7 results

  1. (Courtesy of The Montreal Gazette) :goodvibes: I remember bike riding through there practically every weekend when I was younger. Took a while, but it was a nice ride.
  2. (Courtesy of The Real Estalker) :eek: True this is nothing compared to the Desmarais estate in the middle of no where of Quebec.
  3. Montreal's Cogeco aquires Toronto Hydro Mike King, Montreal Gazette Published: Friday, June 13 MONTREAL - Cogeco Cable Inc. is spreading its network into Canada's biggest business telecommunications market with the purchase of Toronto Hydro Telecom Inc. "This acquisition is another step in the enrichment of the Cogeco Business Solutions Data offering," Louis Audet, president and CEO of the Montreal company, said yesterday in announcing the deal. He said THTI's state-of-the-art network, dedicated workforce and Toronto business market potential "should complement our existing business telecommunications activities in Ontario and allow future growth for Cogeco Cable in this line of business." Cogeco is the second-largest cable telecommunications operator in Ontario, Quebec and Portugal respectively based on the number of basic cable subscribers. Audet said the takeover "demontrates our willingness to seize upon external growth opportunities in our Canadian footprint when they arise and fit well with our business strategy." The deal provides Cogeco with a unique chance to add owned and operated points of presence throughout the greater Toronto area, linked to its other existing broadband facilities extending over the dense Ontario telecommunications corridor from Windsor to Cornwall. At the same time, THTI customers will be able to benefit from Cogeco's extensive fiber network spanning Ontario and Quebec. Shares closed at $39.89 on the Toronto Stock Exchange yesterday, up $1.08. [email protected] http://www.canada.com/montrealgazette/news/business/story.html?id=8bb1d48f-5b0f-44ce-a31a-3ee91ef6ef00
  4. Fayolle to open HQ in Montreal The French privately owned Fayolle engineering, construction and environmental group said Tuesday it is setting up its North American headquarters in Montreal, where it has operated a Canadian unit since 2006. "Through our new Montreal HQ we intend to become a major player in the architectural engineering field in Quebec and across Canada," said Hugues Fastrel, executive vice-president of Fayolle Canada. "Later, we will penetrate the North American market as a whole to continue our global expansion." Fayolle Canada has 400 employees, half in Quebec, and annual revenue of $500 million. The 80-year-old parent company is owned by the Fayolle family of France. It plans to hire 50 more workers in Montreal over the next three years. "Fayolle's decision to choose Montreal as a springboard for its North American and global development attests to the city's diverse industrial base, qualified workforce and competitive cost structure," said Jacques St-Laurent, CEO of Montreal International. the private-public partnership that works to develop Metropolitan Montreal's international status. http://www.montrealgazette.com/business/Fayolle+open+Montreal/4403605/story.html
  5. Not sure how absurd this sounds, but seeing Quebec had Hydro-Quebec as a crown corporation and it sells electricity to Quebecers and to the people in the US. Why doesn't Quebec get into the mining gold or lithium business. I was thinking of it today. Seeing Quebec once hopes to be its own proper nation, why not start mining gold. Its a great way to build a reserve to back a currency (if they ever choose to use their own) and they can sell to the people, just like what they do with Hydro-Quebec. Plus many countries have oil and other minerals owned by the Government. (Courtesy of Quebec Government)
  6. The Myth of Montreal Posted 12 Feb 2008 at 12:18 PM by Bill Archer There are a great many of you who will stop reading at the above title and skip right to the comments section which Huss thoughtfully provides in order for all and sundry to heap abuse on poor ink-stained wretches like Dan and I. Fair enough. We can take it. (Just lay off of 10Shirt. He's a sensitive, New Age guy.) So in the spirit of goodwill, mutual respect and bonhomie for which I am justifiably famous, herewith some "Inconvenient Truths" regarding Montreal fielding a team in MLS. First off, let's look at Montreal's geographical dilemma, because lost somewhere in the discussion about whether Montreal is leaving USL1 is the fact that USL1 seems to be leaving Montreal. This concept is illustrated perfectly by the history of the "Can-Am Cup" competition, which was a competition between Montreal, Toronto, Rochester and Syracuse. A nice little regional tournament which added a little drama to the season by highlighting natural rivalries. Except that Syracuse folded in 2004, Toronto left the league in 2007 and there's a good chance Rochester will cease to exist in 2008. So much for natural rivalries. In fact, USL1 used to have quite a few teams within a quick plane flight, and all of them - save the teetering Rochester Rhinos - are now just memories: Long Island collapsed in 2002. Pittsburgh and Indiana in 2003. Syracuse was gone in 2004. Virginia Beach in 2006. Toronto skipped to MLS in 2007. And what new cities have taken their place? Well, there was Portland Oregon in 2001, followed by Puerto Rico in 2003 and Miami in 2005. In other words, if Rochester really does go the way of all things, the shortest road trip and closest "regional rival" will be the Carolina Railhawks, in Cary, NC, a mere 871 miles away. If home and home grudge matches between those two don't light you up, your next choices would be Charleston, SC (1134 miles) St Paul (1240 miles) and their friendly neighbor Vancouver, which is a staggering 3000 miles from the stinky cheese of home. And the league is welcoming a new member this year: Austin Texas (the obnoxiously named "Aztex"). Apparently the Dark Side of the Moon still has some stadium issues to sort out, but look for them in 2009. In short, if you're a travel agent, the Impact is the Mother lode, Holy Grail, put-down-a-deposit-on-oceanfront-property of clients. By the end of 2008 they'll have racked up more frequent flier miles than Barack Obama. Compare this planeride/hotel existence competing against a bunch of far distant cities the average Quebecois couldn't care less about with membership in Major League Soccer East: Toronto anybody? How about New York? New England? DC? Possibly Philadelphia? Think maybe you could gin up a little fan interest in any of those games? Talk about a no-brainer: step up to a Division 1 league offering readymade rivalries with major North American cities and have your travel expenses go down? Where do I sign? Get Garber on the horn! Plus, as everyone knows, because it gets repeated on BigSoccer 50 times a day, Montreal is a) moving into a gleaming new Soccer Specific Stadium this April, b) Draws 12,000 fans a game in a minor league and c) is owned by a scion of the deep-pockets Saputo family, worldwide cheese purveyors. What else could you possibly want? What kind of idiot is Don Garber, wasting time playing footsie with Philly and St Looey while this golden opportunity is just a quick hop across the border? Well, to paraphrase Havey Keitel (Mr Wolf) in Pulp Fiction, let's not start "congratulating ourselves" quite yet, gentlemen. There are a couple of issues getting lost in the confetti here, to wit: First of all, the Impact is not owned by team President Joey Saputo. After the team went bankrupt in 2002 (something nobody ever seems to mention) the team was resurrected as a non-profit organization owned by Saputo, the Quebec Government and Hydro-Quebec. It's charter is to serve as a representative for Montreal tourism and as an incubator for Quebec-born soccer talent. So leaving aside the question of just how Phil Anschutz might feel about being partnered with a bunch of French-speaking politicians, and just how this ownership structure translates to MLS (and, honestly, it doesn't) there's the fact that a good deal of the Impact's success at the box office is due to the fact that they field as many Quebed-born players as they can find, another thing which won't likely translate well into MLS unless their goal is to lose all the time. Furthermore, Saputo, who would have to be the one to take over ownership and become and MLS partner, has been bad mouthing MLS for the better part of a decade, very publicly disparaging the caliber of play and scoffing at any hint that he might be interested in joining up. Back when MLS was desperate for someone - anyone - to step up and buy a team, Saputo ridiculed the idea that it was worth the $10 million asking price. A year or two later, when he could have bought in for $15 million, he announced that it just wasn't worth the money. But maybe, as the USL has migrated away from Montreal, and after seeing Toronto's success last season, maybe he's changed his mind and, being the gracious, good-hearted, forgiving types that we are, why wouldn't we simply forgive and forget and - assuming he's changed his mind, a proposition for which there is but scant evidence - roll out the red carpet and welcome him with roses and champagne? Short answer: his stadium. Now, on any day of the week you can read dozens of BigSoccer expansion experts raving about the wonderful new stadium in Montreal. They'll tell you how, although it only seats 13,000, it is "expandable" to 18,000 (officially it was 17,000 but 18 sounds better, apparently) and if that's still a little small, well, why let that get in the way of a good story? I would suggest to those of you who are dying to put MLS in that building to look at a couple facts. Starting with the cost of construction: Among recent stadium projects, Red Bull Park will come in somewhere between $180-200 million. If memory serves, Bridgeview was built for around $100 million. Sandy Stadium is projected to wind up at roughly $115 million. Chester (Philadelphia) and the proposal in Miami both call for $100 million buildings. Saputo Stadium (Stade Saputo for you Francophones) will be completed this April at a total cost of $15 million. Canadian. By comparison, Columbus Crew stadium, which a lot of MLS fans denigrate as being a cheaply built galvanized erector set high school stadium cost Lamar Hunt over $28 million. Ten year ago. So let's have a look at the gleaming soccer palace which so many of you insist ought to become an MLS venue immediately if not sooner, shall we? The small cement block building in the corner is the combination restroom and concession stand. Just like your local high school only smaller. The expansion to 17,000? They'll put another set of bleachers in the open end, where the consruction trailers are. It'll make all the difference, I'm sure. Now this is a very nice little stadium for USL1. Works very well. But for MLS? Seriously? I mean, the place makes Crew Stadium look like Anfield. Sorry, Montreal. It's just not going to happen. http://www.bigsoccer.com/forum/blog.php?b=277
  7. Canada Says Aloha to aloft Starwood Hotels' New Select-Service Hotel Brand, Created by the W Hotels Team, To Open Properties in Toronto and Dorval TORONTO, May 16 /CNW/ - Starwood Hotels & Resorts Worldwide, Inc. (NYSE:HOT) announced today at the Canadian Hotel Investment Conference, plans for two aloft hotels in Canada. These aloft properties, part of Starwood's new select service hotel brand, will be located in downtown Toronto and in Dorval at the Montreal Airport, and will be franchised under long-term license agreements with Starwood. In the same way W Hotels broke through the clutter of conformity in the upscale hotel arena, aloft - A Vision of W Hotels will raise the bar in the tired select-service category, delivering urban-inspired, loft-like guest rooms, enhanced technology services, landscaped outdoor spaces for socializing day and night and an energetic lounge scene to nearly 500 markets worldwide by 2012. "aloft has set out to eliminate the trials of travel by incorporating style, convenience and a social environment - similar to the atmosphere in W's Living Rooms - to an otherwise tired, lonely experience," said Brian McGuinness, VP, aloft brand development. "We're excited about moving into Canada - clearly aloft has made a strong connection with the development community in North America and around the world." aloft guest rooms will feature 9-foot ceilings, oversized windows to maximize natural light and create a residential feel, ultra-comfortable beds, well-designed workspaces, and wireless access throughout the property. The hotels will also feature re:fuel, a gourmet grab & go food and beverage concept featuring signature sweet, savoury and healthy foods, 24 hours a day, as well as a destination bar for unwinding, aptly named w xyz. The aloft Toronto will command a superb address in the dynamic Niagara St. and Portland St. enclave. The hotel will feature 250 guest rooms in a brand new construction high-rise concept. The site, adjacent to picturesque Victoria Memorial Square Park, backs onto Front St. West, with the arrival court and main entrance on Niagara St. The area is fast becoming known for lifestyle offerings, including some of the city's best restaurants and hippest residential projects. The developer, owner/operator is Manga Hotels International, which is owned by Dave Toor. Construction is slated to begin mid-2007, with a projected opening in late 2008. The aloft Dorval will offer travellers at Pierre Elliot Trudeau International Airport a refreshing new place to stay. The new hotel, featuring 136 loft-like guest rooms, will be located right at the entrance to the bustling airport. The developer and owner/operator is the Silver Hotel Group, owned by Deepak Ruparell. Construction is slated to start in late 2006, with a projected opening some 12 - 18 months later. "We are thrilled to be bringing the aloft concept to life in this vibrant, hip area of Toronto," said Dave Toor, President & CEO, Manga Hotels International. "aloft hotels brings a unique sense of style and service to our guests that will bring something fresh and exciting to the market. It is great to be working with the team at Starwood as they continue to raise the bar." "It is very exciting for us to have the opportunity to be on board as this new brand takes off in Canada," said Deepak Ruparell, President, Silver Hotel Group. "We believe that aloft hotels will offer travellers a new twist on their hotel stay, offering a stylish, refreshing alternative to what's currently out there." Each aloft hotel will incorporate W's heritage: a totally sensory experience, design integrity and attention to materials as much as to details. Design visionary David Rockwell and the Rockwell Group, whose award-winning projects include the Kodak Theater, Nobu and the W Union Square, collaborated on aloft's design.