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Found 17 results

  1. Gillette to phase Tiger Woods out of ads New York — Associated Press Published on Saturday, Dec. 12, 2009 11:57AM EST Last updated on Saturday, Dec. 12, 2009 4:05PM EST New York — Associated Press Published on Saturday, Dec. 12, 2009 11:57AM EST Last updated on Saturday, Dec. 12, 2009 4:05PM EST One of Tiger Woods’ major sponsors will phase the world’s most valuable athlete out of its advertisements while he takes time off to repair his personal life. Gillette’s announcement Saturday marks the first major sponsor of the superstar athlete and corporate pitchman to distance itself from Woods. “As Tiger takes a break from the public eye, we will support his desire for privacy by limiting his role in our marketing programs,” said Gillette, a division of Procter & Gamble. Other sponsors are mulling their options and trying to gauge the fallout from the man who has become the face of golf, as he drops off the circuit for an unspecified period. AT&T said it is evaluating its relationship with the golfer. Representatives from Accenture won’t say what its plans are regarding Woods, whom the consulting firm has used to personify its claimed attributes of integrity and high performance. “I think you will see the handful or so of companies that he has relationships with doing some real soul searching and making some probably, for them, difficult decisions in the next few days,” said Larry L. Smith, president of the Institute for Crisis Management, in Louisville, Ky. Late Friday, Woods announced an indefinite leave from golf and public life to try to rescue his marriage after a two weeks of intense coverage of his infidelity sullied his carefully cultivated good guy image. The decision and contrite tone of his statement was seen by marketing experts as a smart step to repairing his public image. His previous brief and vague statements on the matter were criticized as insufficient to quell the intense scrutiny and to lessen the damage from more than a handful of women who claim to have had affairs with him. “It’s just like your most beautiful fashion brand is being trashed,” said John Sweeney, director of sports communication at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill’s School of Journalism and Mass Communication. “I don’t expect Tiger to be the gold standard anymore, but he’s not going out of business ... He’s too big and too talented to be fired, but he will have significant declines from what he was.” Woods, 33, spent 13 years burnishing a pristine personal brand. His good looks and multiracial heritage gave him broad appeal. His domination of the game and fist-pumping flair for the dramatic established his tournament appearances as must-see TV. His work ethic is admirable. Marketers were drawn to his image as a clean-cut family man who mourned the death of the father who taught him the game, doted on his mother and married a former Swedish model with whom he has two young children. Woods is the pitchman for brands ranging from AT&T to Accenture to Nike. His array of endorsements helped him become the first sports star to earn $1 billion. Michael Jordan, Woods’ closest contemporary, is a distant second. Jordan has accumulated about $800 million during an NBA career that spanned nearly 20 years, according to Forbes. Nike, which built its $650-million golf business around Woods, said late Friday it supports his decision. Gatorade, a unit of PepsiCo Inc., said previously it supports Woods and said Saturday it has no updated comment. Gillette’s decision includes phasing out Woods from its television and print advertising, and from public appearances and other efforts linking the two entities together, Gillette spokesman Damon Jones said. “This is supporting his desire to step out of the public eye and we’re going to support him by helping him to take a lower profile,” he said. Gillette, which operates from Boston while parent P&G is based in Cincinnati, has had a contract with Woods since 2007. Jones declined to provide further details, including length and value, of the contract. Woods hasn’t been seen in a prime-time television commercial since a Gillette spot on Nov. 29, according to research firm Nielsen Co. Jones said that was because golf is currently off-season, so the company is promoting new products like Gillette Fusion MVP with football and baseball stars instead, because those seasons are more current. As any ads featuring Woods expire, they will not be renewed. Jones said that did not mean the company was severing its ties with Woods. There had been no upcoming scheduled public appearances for Woods, he said. He declined to comment on when the company would resume including Woods in its marketing, and would not say whether that would be linked with the timing of Woods comeback, when and if he decides to resume playing golf.
  2. Malade Les condos 56 Leonard à NYC viennent de vendre un locker de 200 p.c. au sous-sol pour 300,000$! C'est 1,500$ du pied carré!!!
  3. Un tour de table avec des spécialistes en marketing et branding (ainsi que Richard Bergeron). À écouter, et on reparle de vos réactions. http://www.radio-canada.ca/audio-video/pop.shtml#urlMedia=http://www.radio-canada.ca/Medianet/2010/CBF/JeLaiVuALaRadio201008071505_1.asx
  4. Habs 'recession-proof' Canadiens anniversary merchandise is selling well. and the team even has an authorized special edition Monopoly game By MIKE KING, The GazetteJanuary 9, 2009 8:03 AM Being a sports monopoly with a merchandising power play extending to its own Monopoly board game has helped insulate the Montreal Canadiens from an economic slump affecting other teams and even entire leagues, a Concordia University marketing professor says. "The Canadiens and the New York Yankees may be the only two franchises that are recession-proof," said Bruno Delorme, a sports marketing and management professor at Concordia's John Molson School of Business. He called the century-old hockey team an anomaly in the sports world for its continued success during difficult financial times and offered reasons for the club's ability to remain prosperous. First, there's the monopoly of being what Delorme described as "the only true professional North American-wide sports franchise" in town. Second, the team is celebrating its 100th anniversary this season, boosting its already rich heritage. The official team boutique at the downtown Bell Centre has been expanded to accommodate additional souvenirs marking the centennial celebrations, items ranging from reproductions of vintage jerseys to an authorized special edition Habs Monopoly game. Anniversary merchandise creates a large revenue stream, said Delorme, who admitted to "buying a brick myself" in reference to the 20,000 personalized bricks being sold in Centennial Plaza outside the Bell Centre. The commemorative bricks, which can be inscribed with names and messages, range in price from $175 to $799 plus tax. Struggling corporations like the Big Three U.S. automakers are drastically cutting back sponsorship dollars for sports - something Delorme said especially affects the National Basketball Association, National Football League, Major League Baseball and their teams. But the impact is less on the National Hockey League because "hockey is a more gate-driven sport." Also playing in the Habs favour is a phenomenon Delorme pointed to: "when there's a recession, people tend to look to sports for escapism." Asked to comment on Delorme's remarks, Donald Beauchamp, team vice-president of communications, said the privately owned Canadiens don't discuss the business side of the operation. [email protected] © Copyright © The Montreal Gazette
  5. Federal cash could put CFL team in Quebec City RHEAL SEGUIN Globe and Mail Update September 3, 2008 at 3:31 PM EDT The federal government will announce today a multimillion dollar infrastructure program for Quebec that could pave the way for a Canadian Football league franchise in Quebec City. The federal funding includes the expansion and renovation of Quebec City's Laval University sports centre where local investors are offering to expand the football stadium in their bid for a CFL franchise. According to prominent Quebec City lawyer Marc Bellemare, local investors have already set aside half of the $40-million needed to expand the stadium with the other half expected to come from other potential investors once the project is approved. However the head of Laval University Denis Brière has been reluctant in giving his full support to the stadium's expansion for a CFL franchise. “It would be irresponsible to say no to the expansion of the football stadium.,” Mr. Bellemare said on behalf of the anonymous investors in an interview on Tuesday. “The investors need to settle the situation involving the stadium. And then we can move and show the rest of Canada that Quebec City is truly a city capable of attracting a CFL franchise.” According to a marketing conducted on behalf of the investors the marketing firm Impact Recherche, 71 per cent of Quebec City residents support a CFL franchise. The study obtained by the Globe and Mail showed that 43-per cent of the 1001 people polled would be interested in purchasing a season ticket and that 85-per cent believed that Laval University sports centre would be an appropriate location to hold CFL games. The investors worked closely with the Montreal Alouettes in preparing their project for a CFL franchise. Alouette's president Larry Smitth said in a recent local radio interview he embraced Quebec City as a potential CFL franchise location saying it would create a healthy rivalry between the two city that would boost interest for the league throughout Quebec. According to Mr. Bellemare, CFL director general Michael Copeland also indicated to him that Quebec City would be an ideal location for the league's proposed expansion project. Quebec City has one of the most popular university football teams where the Laval University Rouge et Or has attracted as many as 19,000 people to local games in a stadium that only has slightly more than 10,000 seats. The marketing study showed that the attraction of CFL franchise in the city would not have a negative impact on the popularity of local university foot ball games. “The university hold four local games per season. Most of the CFL local games could be scheduled in July and August and would no compete with the university games,” Mr. Bellemare said. “Now it's up to the government to urge the university to change their plans for a new sports centre to allow for the stadium's expansion. Laval University's current $85-million sports centre proposal includes the construction of an indoor soccer field on empty land next to the current football stadium. The city has announced it will inject $10-million in the project with the other $75-million coming from equal contributions from Ottawa and the province. The investors have proposed that the university modify the plan in order to move the soccer stadium further east and use the empty field for the expansion of the football field. Today federal Minister of Transport, Infrastruture and Communities Lawrence cannon will confirm Ottawa's contribution to the university's sport centre proposal. Mr. Cannon as well as Quebec Finance Minister Monique Jérôme-Forget are expected to respond to investors' proposal for changes to the University's plan that could pave the way for a CFL franchise in the city.
  6. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia The Barcode Project is a section of the Bjørvika portion of the Fjord City redevelopment on former dock and industrial land in central Oslo. It consists of a row of new multi-purpose high-rise buildings, due to be completed in 2014. The developer is marketing the project as "The Opera Quarter." There has been intense public debate about the height and shape of the buildings. video from Kristian Larsen
  7. Transcontinental fait l'acquisiton de Rastar 4 septembre 2008 - 12h56 LaPresseAffaires.com Transcontinental (TCL.A) a annoncé avoir fait l’acquisition de Rastar, une entreprise américaine de marketing direct et dans l'impression numérique de données variables. Selon l’imprimeur québécois, Rastar va permettre à Transcontinental de poursuivre l’expansion de ses services marketing. Rastar est une société privée dont les revenus annuels s'élèvent à environ 50 M$ US et compte parmi ses clients de nombreuses entreprises qui évoluent dans des marchés comme l'automobile, les biens de consommation et l'industrie du détail. Le communiqué de presse ne donne pas de détails sur la valeur de la transaction. Le PDG de Transcontinental a souligné l’apport de cette acquisition pour son groupe. «Nous commençons à peine à explorer le potentiel des services de marketing intégrés que nous pouvons désormais offrir à nos clients», a souligné François Olivier. Les quelque 350 employés de Rastar se joindront au secteur des produits et services de marketing de Transcontinental, sous la responsabilité de son président, Guy Manuel.
  8. Les détails financiers de l'acquisition ne sont pas dévoilés. Rastar est une entreprise américaine de marketing direct et dans l'impression numérique de données variables. Pour en lire plus...
  9. Im not trying to start a crap fest, but here are the poll results from leger marketing (Page 3) http://www.legermarketing.com/documents/pol/081119ENG.pdf Whats even more interesting is that 25% of PQ voters would vote against separation, so either there are some sovreigntists hiding in the Liberal support or in the ADQ
  10. As the Economy Worsens, Is There Money for Play? The economy was a factor in a recent merger involving Dale Earnhardt’s team, left. General Motors often runs Super Bowl commercials, center, and sponsors events like the baseball All-Star Game. By KATIE THOMAS Published: November 15, 2008 From the “Buick” emblazoned on Tiger Woods’s golf bag to the Chevrolet Camaro that Cole Hamels drove home last month for being named the most valuable player of the World Series, it is hard to be a sports fan without stumbling across some type of advertisement for General Motors. The company consistently ranks first among advertisers of televised sporting events, outspending other automakers by more than two to one. Billy Casper, left, received a car for winning the inaugural Buick Open in 1958. The tournament has been a PGA Tour staple. But as G.M. faces a financial crisis that has executives pleading with Congress for a federal bailout, many are wondering how far the company’s troubles will extend into the sports industry, which is already struggling to attract advertisers and sponsors in a weakened economy. “It’s one of those trickle-down effects that people don’t look at,” said David E. Cole, the chairman of the Center for Automotive Research, a nonprofit research organization. “It has already hit hard.” G.M. has been scaling back its sports presence for at least a year. Cadillac, a G.M. brand, withdrew its sponsorship of the Masters golf tournament in January, and this summer, G.M. ended its relationships with two Nascar racetracks: Bristol Motor Speedway in Tennessee and New Hampshire Motor Speedway. The company is not renewing its longstanding partnership with the United States Olympic Committee when their contract expires at the end of this year. In one of the most dramatic examples of the company’s diminishing sports profile, G.M. said recently that it would not buy television commercials in this season’s Super Bowl broadcast. As G.M. argues its case before Congress, some firms whose contracts with the company are up for renewal are anxiously monitoring developments. “We’re actually in negotiations as we speak,” said Mitch Huberman, the senior vice president of Fox Sports Enterprises, which owns Pac-10 Properties and handles marketing for the Pacific-10 conference. Its contract with Pontiac, also produced by G.M., ends this year. “There are a lot of question marks in terms of where budgets are going,” Huberman said. “It’s kind of wait and see.” G.M., hit hard by plummeting consumer spending and tight credit markets, has reported that it is running out of cash and faces bankruptcy if it does not receive emergency federal assistance. In its third-quarter report, released earlier this month, the company said it planned to trim advertising by 20 percent and promotional spending by 25 percent. “We’re looking at literally everything,” said Peter Ternes, G.M.’s director of communications for sales, service and marketing. He said the cuts would be applied evenly but did not provide details about proposed changes to the company’s sports budget. Still, he said G.M. would not withdraw from sports entirely. “I think we’ll still be there,” he said. “It may not be at the volume that people have seen before, but we’ll still be a presence.” G.M.’s troubles come at a time when sports organizations are struggling to attract sponsors in a weak economy. The Nascar teams Chip Ganassi Racing and Dale Earnhardt Inc., citing a difficult economic climate, announced a merger last week. On Friday, the Tour de Georgia, one of the nation’s premier cycling events, said it was canceling its 2009 race because it could not find a sponsor. Also on Friday, Nascar said it was suspending all testing at its tracks next season as a cost-cutting measure. Like beer and razors, automobiles have long been a staple of commercials during major sporting events, and for good reason, marketing experts said. At a time when digital video recorders and an array of cable channels have splintered television audiences, sporting events attract a large and passionate audience who often watch events as they happen. G.M. has historically taken advantage of this audience by investing heavily in television advertising. The company has been the top TV sports advertiser for at least the last five years, vastly outspending its nearest competitors. For example, in 2007, G.M. spent close to $578 million on TV sports advertising. The No. 2 advertiser, Toyota, spent less than half that, or nearly $287 million, according to Nielsen Media Research. Earlier this year, General Motors aired 11 advertisements during the Super Bowl, according to TNS Media Intelligence, a research firm. The decision not to buy a Super Bowl ad in 2009 may have more to do with public perception than with the company’s cash-strapped predicament. This year’s spots are each selling for $3 million, a fraction of G.M.’s total sports spending. However, if the company were to receive a federal bailout, airing a Super Bowl commercial could anger taxpayers who see the purchase as extravagant, said Kenneth L. Shropshire, the director of the Wharton Sports Business Initiative at the University of Pennsylvania. “Then people are saying, was that the right use of money for a one-day sporting event?” he said. Although executives for several television outlets would not speak publicly, several said their sales representatives had detected a shift in G.M.’s ad purchases — what some called a “flight to quality” — toward programs that have proved successful in the past. And although G.M. recently scaled back its presence on networks in prime time, one network television executive said sports remained a “stable destination.” There are signs that G.M. is continuing to invest in some sports. About a year ago, Chevrolet extended its sponsorship of Major League Baseball through the 2010 season. Ternes, the G.M. spokesman, pointed to plans by the company to invest heavily in next year’s N.C.A.A. men’s Final Four in Detroit, the nation’s automobile capital. On the surface, organizations with existing agreements with G.M. may consider a bailout a preferable outcome, because under a bankruptcy, the company could ask a court to void contracts. But because a federal bailout would also very likely lead to significant restructuring, some said G.M. could be compelled to try to renegotiate active contracts anyway. “With the bailout probably comes strings attached, and what those strings are, who knows?” said Greg Brown, the president of Learfield Sports, which handles marketing for 50 university athletic programs. Rather than seek to cancel existing contracts, several sports executives said G.M. and other companies were more likely to scale back promotions and focus on initiatives that led directly to a sale. “If you’re on the verge of bankruptcy, then you want to find out how to get the money now, rather than how do I get the 15-year-old to start thinking about the car they want to buy in the future?” Shropshire said. Sponsors may focus on promotions that draw fans to dealerships, like T-shirt giveaways or ticket sweepstakes, said Jim Andrews, the editorial director of IEG Sponsorship Report, a trade publication. Sponsorships, he added, can also create a “warm, fuzzy” perception that a company is supporting a customer’s favorite team. “That’s why you’re not seeing any of the automakers, even though they are in dire straits, saying we’ve got to pull out wholesale,” Andrews said. “Because I think they know there is a return on investment.” In some cases, foreign automakers have stepped in when American companies have pulled out. Chevrolet, for example, decided not to renew its sponsorship of the United States Ski Team last year, but Audi took its place. Honda recently replaced Dodge as the official automobile of the N.H.L. Although the troubles in Detroit played a role in that outcome, Honda fit better within the N.H.L.’s goal of becoming a more international brand, according to Keith Wachtel, the league’s senior vice president for corporate sales and marketing. But for now, marketers at a variety of sports organizations say they are in for some tough times. “In this environment, autos are going to be off across the board,” said Tim Finchem, the commissioner of the PGA Tour. Two of its tournaments are sponsored by Buick through 2010, and others are sponsored by Chrysler, BMW, Honda and Mercedes. “They’re doing, in varying degrees, terrible,” he said. “The U.S. automakers are really struggling. Now, who knows?” Finchem, however, said he was confident the companies would remain in business, which meant “they’re still going to be selling cars and, again, we have a good platform from which they can promote.”
  11. Efforts de marketing réussis des commerçants? Écoles plus exigeantes? La rentrée scolaire est devenue une intense période de magasinage, avec d’autant plus de stress pour les parents qui font face cette année à une quasi-récession. Pour en lire plus...
  12. How Pepsi won the Quebec Cola Wars By René Bruemmer, The GazetteJuly 11, 2009 MONTREAL - Pepsi had a major problem. More specifically, Pepsi had a major Quebec problem. After decades of protracted Cola Wars, the perennial challenger was finally making some headway on Coke in 1984, which outsold Pepsi four-to-one in Canada in the early ’70s. Waves of successful marketing campaigns, including the long-running “Take the Pepsi Challenge” taste test, helped bring Pepsi up to parity with Coke in English food stores in Canada by 1980. Except in Quebec, which was jarring because the province had long been associated with a fondness for Pepsi – so much so the corporation’s first bottling plant outside of the U.S. opened in Montreal in 1934. Yet the corporation’s latest rebranding campaign, “The Choice of a New Generation,” backed by global superstars Michael Jackson, David Bowie and Madonna, was falling flat in Quebec. In 1984, according to a report compiled by the Canadian Congress of Advertising, Pepsi had stalled at 87 per cent of Coca-Cola’s share in a province that imbibed 25 to 30 per cent of all the soft drinks in Canada. Marketers decided to embark on a risky, expensive and unorthodox scheme: abandon Michael Jackson and develop an advertising strategy that would reflect the distinct society’s cultural differences, sensibilities and sense of humour. Riskier still because while Pepsi had been adopted as a self-effacing term by some Quebecers, it was also a derogatory slur used by non-francophones to describe them. If the marketing plan was seen as offensive, Pepsi could become a pariah. Being No. 2 had its advantages, however, noted University of Ottawa marketing professor Luc Dupont. “As the constant David, Pepsi was condemned to take risks, which made it more inventive, forced it to rely more on its intelligence,” he said. Pepsi would stake its multimillion-dollar offensive on a local comedian and his coterie of bizarre characters. In exchange, Quebec would become, and remain, one of the few places in the world where Pepsi has conquered the king of pop. *** Pepsi is celebrating its 75th anniversary in Quebec this year, in conjunction with the opening of the Montreal plant in 1934. It’s rolling out a new logo and ad campaign, one of more than a dozen branding changes over a history that dates back to 1898. It’s also putting $40 million into its Montreal bottling facilities, one of several plants in the province employing a total of 1,200 people. That investment, along with large amounts of money spent sponsoring sports and culture (among them the Colisée Pepsi arena in Quebec City, and the Pepsi Forum in Montreal) is another key to its success, says Éric Blais of Toronto-based Headspace Marketing, which advises companies on how to reach the Quebec market. “They have become part of the cultural landscape, both through marketing and direct involvement in the province,” Blais said. Despite the fact it was created only 12 years after Coke, Pepsi remained a constant second, staking its market share largely on the fact it was distributed in larger, reused beer bottles and offered more fizz for the buck (actually a nickel for a 12-ounce bottle in the Depression era). But being the underdog allowed it to take chances. In the 1940s it became one of the first corporations to use a realistic black family in its ads (as opposed to Aunt Jemima), and hired a black manager for all-black sales teams that would target the huge niche market of African Americans, despite virulent opposition from within and outside of the company, including the Ku Klux Klan. But in the 1980s the New Generation offensive – meant to lure young drinkers who would make Pepsi their habit – was tanking here. Standard marketing practice would have been to tweak the campaign by translating it into French and using some of Quebec’s many popular rock stars. Instead, the J. Walter Thompson company relied on qualitative research and decided go with a different selling point – comedy. “Young Quebecers in the 1980s ... were crowning their own celebrities and creating their own made-in-Quebec lifestyle,” wrote the J. Walter Thompson company in a submission to the Cassies, the Canadian Advertising Awards. “Research revealed an inner confidence among Quebec target groups. ... “Since Quebec was culturally unique, it had developed its own entertainment system complete with its own stars,” especially in the comedy milieu. “It was a style of comedy that used typical Quebecois stereotypes to redefine the emerging new ‘street-smart’ culture of young, urban Quebecers.” Claude Meunier, famous for his absurdist humour on Ding et Dong television skits, was chosen. The theme of Meunier’s ads remained an intractable joie de vivre and an undying love of Pepsi. His brief, 30-second spots debuting in 1985 and featuring a variety of characters and a humour only Quebecers could appreciate became an instant hit. Pepsi came almost neck and neck with Coke the same year. By 1986, David had surpassed Goliath and continued to thrive, despite the fact Coke fought back, outspending Pepsi two-to-one on six media campaigns between 1985 and 1993. “Quebecers had the sentiment that a multinational corporation finally took the trouble to try and understand them, using the same language, with the same accents,” Dupont said. A nation moored in a sea of English could empathize with company fighting for purchase in an ocean of Coke. “Subconsciously, Quebecers identify with products that are No. 2,” Dupont said. “In addition to the absurd humour and joy of life, they like to say, ‘We’re different here. We changed things.’ ” The Meunier campaign would last 18 years, aided by the fact Meunier became the star of La Petite Vie, an early ’90s Quebec sitcom watched by 4 million out of a possible 6 million viewers every Monday night. The Meunier Pepsi campaign won the 1993 CASSIE Best of Show advertising award. *** Today, Coke dominates the global market with 51 per cent of the total sales compared with Pepsi’s 22 per cent, according to John Sicher, editor of Beverage Digest. But in Quebec, the Pepsi stable of soft drinks owns 61 per cent of the market to Coke’s 20, said Manon Lavallée, market development manager for PepsiCo Canada. It’s a dominance unseen anywhere else in North America, although Pepsi does nudge out Coke by a slight margin in the Atlantic provinces and a few states. (Coke officials told The Globe and Mail recently the gap is not that large in Quebec when restaurant, hotel and sporting events sales are factored in, but did not give specific numbers.) Twenty-five years after Meunier started with Pepsi, he’s still there, although in a lesser role, shifting to Diet Pepsi. Pepsi opted for a new campaign to speak to a new, multicultural generation of Quebecers in 2003, featuring five young men extolling the unique elements of Quebec (poutine, potholes, moving day and here we say “icitte," not “ici”) under the banner “Ici, c’est Pepsi.” In the rest of the world, it’s Coke. Which is remarkably similar to Molson Canadian’s I Am Canadian ad campaign that focused on Canada’s uniqueness vis-a-vis the U.S. “Pepsi’s ad campaign allowed us to feed that image of ourselves as different," Dupont said. “Even though in fact, we are not so different.” The Pepsi Meunier campaign is taught in textbooks now, Dupont said, a lesson in how to adapt to your market, and change with the time. In its submission for a Cassie award, members of the BBDO Canada marketing firm responsible for the Ici campaign wrote: “The driving force behind Pepsi’s Quebec success was Claude (Meunier’s) unique ability to show that Pepsi is a natural companion to Quebecers.” For the Ici c’est Pepsi campaign, consumers in test market groups “told us Pepsi is part of the fabric of Quebec life and they should be damn proud of it.” The Ici spots, said Chris Hamilton of Pepsi in Strategy Magazine, tested in the top two per cent of all ads ever tested in Quebec. The campaign won a 2005 Cassie. “The ads gave a sense of belonging, the pride in being distinctive,” Blais said. “They tapped into that sentiment of being proud of being the only place in the world where Pepsi is No. 1. “It said ‘We stand on our own, we are distinct.’ ” [email protected] © Copyright © The Montreal Gazette
  13. http://www.journaldemontreal.com/2015/01/30/les-horreurs-de-montreal Les horreurs de Montréal Le Journal a dressé la liste des 9 endroits les plus laids en ville Sarah Bélisle SARAH BÉLISLE Vendredi, 30 janvier 2015 18:17 MISE à JOUR Vendredi, 30 janvier 2015 19:02 « Cheaps », « moches », ou carrément dignes de « l’ère communiste », les alentours de l’aéroport, l’îlot Voyageur et l’échangeur Turcot brillent au palmarès des endroits les plus laids de Montréal. L'échangeur Turcot Nul doute que l’enchevêtrement de bretelles d’autoroutes qui constituent l’échangeur Turcot est vital aux transports routiers sur l’île, alors que plus de 300 000 véhicules l’empruntent chaque jour. N’empêche que la structure de béton qui tombe en ruines ne gagnera pas de concours de beauté. L’îlot Voyageur PHOTO LE JOURNAL DE MONTRÉAL, CAROLINE D’ASTOUS L’îlot Voyageur est une véritable «verrue» qui défigure le centre-ville de Montréal. Vestige du fiasco financier et immobilier qui a secoué l’UQAM, la construction résidentielle qui devait surplomber la rue Berri a été laissée en plan en 2007. Depuis, les Montréalais attendent le parachèvement de la construction de ce squelette de béton, ce qui devrait être chose faite d’ici quelques années. Autour de l'aéroport PHOTO LE JOURNAL DE MONTRÉAL, PIERRE-PAUL POULIN «C’est cheap (...) Ça fait comme les pays de l’Est sous le communisme» – Professeure Anne-Marie Broudehoux «Ce n’est pas normal que la première impression qu’on ait en débarquant de l’avion soit celle d’une zone de guerre», lance le professeur de marketing à l’UQAM, André Richelieu, à propos des abords de l’aéroport de Montréal. «Ce n’est pas acceptable. L’image que ça laisse, ce n’est pas tolérable», déplore-t-il. Sa collègue, Anne-Marie Broudehoux, professeure de l’UQAM spécialiste en images de la ville et marketing urbain partage cet avis. Alors que le chemin reliant l’aéroport au centre-ville est la toute première chose que les touristes voient en arrivant à Montréal, «c’est toutes des arrières cours de hangars [...] Ça fait cheap. Ça ne donne pas beaucoup de prestance quand tu arrives dans une grande ville. Ça fait comme les pays de l’Est sous le communisme. C’est moche.» Notre-Dame Est (entre le centre-ville et l'Autoroute 25) PHOTO LE JOURNAL DE MONTRÉAL, PIERRE-PAUL POULIN La rue Notre-Dame Est «à moitié abandonnée» n’est pas un des endroits les plus reluisants de Montréal, selon la professeure Anne-Marie Broudehoux de l’UQAM, spécialiste en images de la ville et marketing urbain, partage cet avis. «C’est vraiment moche!», s’exclame-t-elle. Mais c’est aussi l’un de ces lieux plutôt laids qui mériteraient le plus qu’on s’attèle à renverser la vapeur, selon elle. François Racine, professeur au département d'études urbaines et touristiques de l'UQAM, classe cette portion de rue dans sa liste des «lieux marqués par la présence d'infrastructures véhiculaires lourdes et dépourvus de toutes qualités urbaines». Il s’agit là d’«espaces discontinus et disloqués très peu attrayants pour les piétons et même pour les automobilistes, voire insécurisants», note le professeur. Les viaducs en particulier PHOTO AGENCE QMI, PASCAL GIRARD Tout particulièrement, les viaducs font partie d’une série d’«espaces inquiétants et sinistres pour les piétons et les cyclistes», note François Racine, professeur au département d'études urbaines et touristiques de l'UQAM. La faute revient aux chemins de fer qui, en plus de scinder des quartiers en deux, obligent les résidents à emprunter des viaducs pas du tout accueillants, mal éclairés et peu sécuritaires, ajoute sa collègue, la professeure Anne-Marie Broudehoux de l’UQAM, spécialiste en images de la ville et marketing urbain. Sous les autoroutes PHOTO LE JOURNAL DE MONTRÉAL, BEN PELOSSE Les dessous des autoroutes de Montréal n’ont rien de bien rassurant. Sinitres et épeurants, il suffirait d’un rien pour en faire des endroits captivants et surprenants. «Le moche c’est souvent des endroits (comme sous les autoroutes) tellement potentiellement intéressants, mais qui sont négligés», explique Dinu Bumbaru, directeur des politiques chez Héritage Montréal. D’autres villes que Montréal «ne peuvent pas se permettre des plaies béantes en plein dans leur ville» ainsi et y ont installé une foule de choses, allant jusqu’à en faire une marque de commerce, relate M. Bumbaru qui propose notamment d’installer de la végétation sous les voies rapides de Montréal. Raffineries de l’est PHOTO LE JOURNAL DE MONTRÉAL, CHANTAL POIRIER Les grandes raffineries de l’Est de l’île d’où s’échappent des filets de fumée ne sont pas en reste. Leurs immenses structures métaliques tout droit issues du monde industriel ne sont pas particulièrement douces aux yeux de bien des gens. Les routes et infrastructures routières «pour l’ensemble de l’oeuvre» PHOTO AGENCE QMI, JOËL LEMAY Il ne fait nul doute dans l’esprit de plusieurs que les routes et infrastructures de la métropole ont grand besoin d’être retapées. Et le mot est faible, selon le professeur titulaire en marketing de l’UQAM, André Richelieu. «Pour une ville du standing de Montréal, ça prend des infrastructures dignes de ce nom. L’état des routes est pitoyable. C’est inacceptable», lance celui qui raconte avoir l’impression de conduire un jeep dans une course à obstacles lorsqu’il circule à Montréal. Sainte-Catherine Ouest PHOTO LE JOURNAL DE MONTRÉAL, SARAH BÉLISLE «Si on veut être dans les ligues majeures, on doit avoir un centre-ville digne de ce nom» – Professeur André Richelieu La rue Sainte-Catherine est l’artère de Montréal qui constitue LA vitrine de la ville auprès des touristes. Or, tout un pan de la Sainte-Catherine Ouest jusqu’à l’ancien Forum «fait pitié», regrette le professeur en marketing de l’UQAM, André Richelieu. «L’ouest tout simplement abandonné. Ça fait vraiment pitié, alors que c’est une localisation de premier ordre. Il y a beaucoup trop d’édifices abandonnés, délabrés. Je ne me l’explique pas», laisse tomber le professeur. «Si l’on veut être dans les ligues majeures, on doit avoir un centre-ville digne de ce nom. La Sainte-Catherine n’est pas à la hauteur.» Quoi faire pour embellir la ville? Faire au moins attention à son apparence Qu’on considère que certains endroits plus laids que d’autres, «ce n’est pas un problème de beauté en fait. On peut discuter longtemps d’esthétisme, de goûts. C’est une question d’avoir l’air de faire l’entretien de la Ville, de faire attention à son apparence, de souci de présentation», insiste la professeure Anne-Marie Broudehoux. Pour l’heure, plusieurs lieux montréalais «donnent l’image d’une société mal organisée, un peu toute croche». Elle ne suggère pas pour autant qu’on ait recours à des architectes de renom ou encore qu’on injecte des millions de dollars. Nul besoin de porter des vêtements hors de prix pour donner l’impression de faire attention à sa personne et bien se présenter en public, plaide la professeure. Place aux arts urbains Montréal regorge de talents et il ne tient qu’à elle de les utiliser pour embellir ses rues, fait valoir la professeure Anne-Marie Broudehoux. Des arbres à la tonne Il ne suffirait que de planter des arbres et de verdir certains coins de Montréal pour les rendre bien plus jolis, plaide la professeure Anne-Marie Broudehoux. Réparer (enfin) les routes Impossible de passer à côté, il faut régler une fois pour toutes la question des routes en mauvais état de la métropole, est d’avis le professeur André Richelieu. D’autant plus qu’«on se soucie tellement de l’image de marque de Montréal à l’international (alors qu’on laisse les rues dans un tel état)», fait-il valoir. sent via Tapatalk
  14. Festivals: The Festival International de Jazz de Montréal wins the prestigious 2007 Silver Posted by: eJazzNews Readeron Tuesday, January 29, 2008 - 11:26 AM Montreal, Monday, January 28, 2008 - The Hospitality Sales and Marketing Association International presented the prestigious Silver Adrian Award 2007 to the Festival International de Jazz de Montréal during a ceremony held today in New York. This was the 51st anniversary of the Silver Adrian Award, considered a very high distinction in the travel sector. A jury consisting of experts from the domains of hotel management, travel, tourism and media considered no fewer than 1,300 submissions before choosing the Festival in the category of "Attractions/Theme Park for Feature Placement Print-Consumer Newspaper" after having read an account in the San Francisco Chronicle. "We are very honoured to receive this prestigious award. It is the result of years of work by the Festival to develop and deploy a marketing strategy, which appears to have paid off handsomely, judging by the growing number of tourists who flock to Montreal each year for our annual 'high mass' of jazz. I would also like to highlight the excellent work and commitment of Lou Hammond & Associates, the agency which has represented us for years in the U.S. market," stated André Ménard, co-founder and artistic director of the Festival. Every summer, the Festival International de Jazz de Montréal presents over 650 shows, including over 280 indoor performances and 372 free outdoor concerts on 25 different stages. Close to 3000 musicians from some 30 countries take part in this massive musical party, with over 2.1 million people pouring onto the site to enjoy it all. For its upcoming edition, the Festival is preparing an enticing outdoor program set to groove to the rhythms of the world. The 29th edition of the Festival International de Jazz de Montréal takes place from June 26 to July 6, 2008. www.montrealjazzfest.com http://www.ejazznews.com/modules.php?op=modload&name=News&file=article&sid=9071&mode=thread&order=0&thold=0
  15. La société achetée est une entreprise torontoise de publicité et de services promotionnels en ligne. Le montant de la transaction n'a pas été précisé. Pour en lire plus...
  16. Video CBC News Quebec lithium mine in Val D'Or, can potentially be the largest in North America. Partner Mitsui & Co