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Found 5 results

  1. Voici ma vision pour le secteur du bord de l'eau. The situation is simple. We have a high-density area surrounding a transit hub, a good example of transit oriented development... but it is locked in by highways. Furthermore, the "Old Longueuil" area, the real cultural, historical and recreational area of Longueuil is blocked off from this downtown area as a result. Finally, the waterfront is also isolated by autoroute 20. This isn't just some random waterfront either.. this is PRIME space. Just across from Sainte-Helene island and Montreal. There's a reason throngs of people come here to watch the fireworks in the summer! The view is exceptional! Solution : Mettre l'autoroute 20 sous terre ainsi qu'une portion du boulevard Taschereau et réunir le bord de l'eau avec Place Charles-Lemoyne (le "centre ville" de Longueuil) et le secteur du Vieux-Longueuil historique (l'autre "centre ville", et selon moi, le vrai) - Faire de cette région un vrai pole économique, culturel, récréotouristique, etc. Optimistic? Ambitious? Naive? Perhaps... i know this project would be hilariously expensive, but damn, imagine the cohesive and dynamic, livable and exciting Longueuil city center that would emerge! Please give me your feedback... i'm very interseted in hearing what you have to say! Merci beaucoup tout le monde! (Metro Charland named after the Montreal South mayor - Montreal South being the small town originally located on that land, eventually merged into Longueuil. Boul Isidore Hurteau named after the first mayor of Longueuil) AVANT APRES
  2. Vancouver and Montreal among 25 most livable cities JOSH WINGROVE From Monday's Globe and Mail June 9, 2008 at 9:03 AM EDT Vancouver and Montreal are the only Canadian entries in a new list of the world's 25 most livable cities. London-based Monocle magazine, a project of Canadian-born style columnist and jet-setter Tyler Brûlé, published the list this month. Vancouver placed eighth - higher than any other North American city - while Montreal finished 16th on the list. Toronto didn't make the cut; nor did Winnipeg, where Mr. Brûlé was born. Monocle lauded Vancouver for its role in fighting climate change, increasing building density and cracking down on drug use in preparation for the 2010 Olympics. Vancouver lost marks for its high crime rate, but jumped seven spots after placing 15th in 2007. The magazine called Montreal "Canada's cultural capital." The city was credited for its strong arts community, booming gaming and aerospace industries and extensive network of free wireless Internet. It lost marks for its strained health-care system, poor recycling facilities and growing income disparity. Mr. Brûlé, who once described the only mention of Canada in Monocle's first issue as "a dig about Calgary," wrote neither synopsis. Monocle named Copenhagen the most livable city, on the strength of its green space and "sense of humour" - Mr. Brûlé wrote that synopsis. Munich, Tokyo, Zurich and Helsinki rounded out the top five. Only three U.S. cities (Honolulu, Minneapolis and Portland) made the list, which also included 14 from Europe, three from Japan, two from Australia, and one, Singapore, from Southeast Asia. High-profile cities such as London, Rome and New York were not mentioned by the magazine, which looked at smaller, user-friendly cities with vibrant arts scenes, plenty of parks and a friendly face. A similar livability study published by The Economist last summer awarded Vancouver first place, while Toronto - snubbed by Monocle - placed fifth out of 123 cities worldwide. http://www.theglobeandmail.com/servlet/story/RTGAM.20080609.wxlcities09/BNStory/lifeMain/home
  3. Sindage IPSOS Vancouver est là, et Toronto, mais pas Montréal. Voir le lien pour lire le texte au complet. Je reproduis la carte qui démontre les choix par génération. Vancouver est plus populaire dans la catégorie des baby boomers. Toronto aussi. https://www.ipsos.com/ipsos-mori/en-uk/ipsos-top-cities-2017?language_content_entity=en-uk Ipsos Top Cities 2017 The 2017 edition of the Ipsos Top Cities Index finds that New York is the most popular city worldwide, retaining the title it claimed when the survey was first run in 2013. Ipsos Top Cities 2017: New York remains the best city for work, rest and play EU publics see London as the top city in Europe The 2017 edition of the Ipsos Top Cities Index finds that New York is the most popular city worldwide, retaining the title it claimed when the survey was first run in 2013. This year sees Abu Dhabi leapfrogging London and Paris into second position, with Tokyo, Sydney and Zurich on the same score in equal fifth. People in 26 countries worldwide were asked which, from a list of 60 global cities, they felt were best to live in, do business in, and visit. The scores from the three questions were then added together to create the Ipsos Cities Index. The cities in the global top five have unique strengths; New York and Abu Dhabi are unparalleled as centres for business but they score less strongly as a place to live or visit, whilst Paris tops the global list of tourism destinations but rates comparatively poorly as a business hub, failing to reach the top 10 on this measure. London and Tokyo have rounded profiles, scoring more evenly across the three dimensions, while Zurich and Sydney’s strength is derived from their high scores as top cities to live in. The remaining top ten positions this year are occupied by Rome, Los Angeles and Amsterdam. The cities at the bottom of this year’s ranking are Nairobi and Tehran.
  4. Walk this way Michelle Kay, Yahoo! Canada News - Fri May 28, 4:01 PM The top-five cities -- Vancouver, Victoria, Montreal, Toronto and Halifax -- have high population densities, which affect how people interact with space and urban planning, he said. The magazine gathered its information through a number of sources, including StatsCan and individual city statistics and then developed a 12-point questionnaire on topics such as the percentage of people who walk to work, park areas, vehicle use, etc. The information was presented to a panel of judges -- author, broadcaster and director of Jane's Walks, Jane Farrow, Guillermo Penalosa, consultant, planner and executive director of the non-profit 8 ? 80 Cities, and sustainability professional Amanda Mitchell. Up! discovered a city with a higher population density embraced a visitor-centric approach when it came to urban planning. The more walkable a city, the more livable it was for its citizens (and easier for tourists to navigate). It comes as no surprise that Vancouver came out on top (see below for the complete list). The city has a number of factors in its favour, from its population density (about 5,000 people per square kilometre), pleasant climate to expansive parkland. Nearly 40 per cent of downtown residents walk to work and it's easy to see why. Vancouver is packed with attractive streetscapes and a progressive street pattern with many maps that help pedestrians find their bearings, Gierasimczuk said. The city provides ample opportunities for its inhabitants and tourists to be active. "It's got this mystique. It has built a reputation as this walkable, active, car-free paradise," he said. A walkable place means a city respects its inhabitants enough to want to provide a manageable and livable space. "All these factors that make a city walkable means that a city celebrates its citizens," Gierasimczuk said. Walking is also one of the simplest, cheapest and healthiest ways to get around. Not only is walking a great way to shed the pounds, it doesn't cost anything to use our own two feet. More often than not, when you go for a walk you discover something new. You notice things you normally wouldn't see from the vantage point of a car or even a bicycle, since walking is an activity that forces you to slow down, breathe, look around and take things in. Now, who wants to go for a stroll? Canada's Most Walkable Cities 2010 1. Vancouver 2. Victoria 3. Montreal 4. Toronto 5. Halifax 6. Quebec City 7. Ottawa 8. Calgary 9. St. John's 10. Winnipeg http://ca.travel.yahoo.com/guides/Other/891/walk-this-way
  5. Old Port 9000 SQ.ft (livable space) 4 Bedroom 5 Bathroom 2 Partial Bathroom For sale: $7.5 Million Westmount 2504 SQ.ft (livable space) 2 Bedroom 2 Bathroom 1 Partial Bathroom For sale: $1,375,000 Senneville unknown SQ.ft (liveable space) [comes with a guesthouse and servants house, which is on 40 ACRES] 4 Bedroom 5 Bathroom 1 Partial Bathroom For sale: $8,800,000 Ile Bizard 30,000+ SQ.ft (livable space) 5 Bedroom 5 Bathroom 1 Partial Bathroom For sale: $7,250,000
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