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Found 8 results

  1. Article by FDI intelligence (financial times) Rankings: 1. New York City 2. Sao Paulo 3 Toronto 4.MONTREAL 5. Vancouver 6. Houston 7. Atlanta 8. San Francisco 9. Chicago 10. Miami "Canadian cities Toronto, Montreal and Vancouver ranked third, fourth and fifth, respectively, and performed particularly well in the attraction of knowledge-intensive FDI. All three locations were among the top 20 key destination and source cities for FDI. With the exception of New York, Montreal-based companies invested in more FDI projects than other city in the Americas region" "Business friendly Canada Placed in third, Montreal’s success lies in retaining and developing relationships with existing investments – data from fDi Markets shows that one in five FDI projects since 2003 were expansions. Montreal tops strategy list The prize for Best Major American City for FDI Strategy 2013/14 is awarded to Montreal. It beat 126 competitors across North and South America who submitted information regarding their FDI strategies. In its American Cities of the Future submission, economic development agency Montréal International stated that its economic development strategy has centred predominantly around high-tech clusters, and in particular aerospace, life sciences and health technologies, as well as information and communications technology (ICT). Elie Farah, vice-president of Investment Greater Montréal, says: “The year 2011 was one of the best for Montréal International in terms of attracting FDI since 2005. This is partially explained by the investments from Europe which, in the past two years, have become the main source of FDI in the region.” http://www.fdiintelligence.com/Locations/Americas/American-Cities-of-the-Future-2013-14
  2. Projet annulé et remplacé par celui-ci : http://www.mtlurb.com/forums/showthread.php/18992 *************************************** Tour St-Jacques Développement de condominiums TYPE:Nouvelle construction CLIENT: OVE Investments Inc. SUPERFICIE:10 161 m2 (109 370 pi. ca.) COÛT DE CONSTRUCTION:42 000 000$ CAD DATE D’ACHÈVEMENT: N/A ENDROIT:Montréal, Québec
  3. Comme quoi on peut virer à 180 degrés une situation. Rien en 2008, puis aujourd'hui, une reconnaissance. On se retrousse les manches et on avance! Nice. http://onstartups.com/tabid/3339/bid/75597/The-Big-List-The-Best-and-Worst-Startup-Stuff-In-2011.aspx
  4. BOCOM SEA TURTLE INDEX The Bank of Communications Sea Turtle Index provides a unique tool to compare university cities at once as education and investment locations, looking at: - Educational returns: Quality and reputation of education vs value for money - Real estate returns: Openness, potential returns and risk with regard to real estate investments - Financial returns: Openness, growth prospects and risk with regard to financial investments - Work experience: Work and pay prospects for overseas graduates - Social experience: Quality of the social and cultural experience on offer OVERALL WORLD RANKING: 1. MONTRÉAL 2. LONDON 3. HONG KONG 4. TORONTO 5. CAMBRIDGE 6. OXFORD 7. BOSTON 8. SYDNEY 9. ZURICH 10 NEW YORK Source
  5. Aeroports de Montreal Releases its Fiscal 2006 Results - Passenger traffic up by 5.0% - Revenues increase by 12.5% - EBITDA rises by 13.0% MONTREAL, QUEBEC--(CCNMatthews - March 7, 2007) - Aeroports de Montreal today announced its audited consolidated financial results for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2006. These results are accompanied by data on passenger traffic and aircraft movements at Montreal-Trudeau and Montreal-Mirabel international airports. Highlights EBITDA (excess of revenues over expenses before interest, income taxes, amortization and share in the net gain of investments at equity value) totalled $117.1 million for the year, an increase of $13.5 million, or 13.0%, over fiscal 2005. During fiscal 2006, the Corporation continued work on its various capital investment programs, mainly at Montreal-Trudeau. Work focused on modernization of the domestic jetty and expansion of the domestic arrivals hall, among other areas. In addition, excavation and foundation work progressed for the future transborder departures area and the hotel. The Corporation invested a total of $83.0 million during fiscal 2006, compared to $192.5 million in 2005. Investments in the airports are financed by cash flows from airport operations, including airport improvement fees ($46.7 million), and by long-term debt ($36.3 million). In early October, the International Centre for Settlement of Investment Disputes (ICSID) rendered its decision in the case of the illegal expropriation of Budapest-Ferihegy International Airport on January 1, 2002. The Hungarian government complied with the verdict and paid the agreed amount of $97.7 million Cdn ($83.8 million US). In accordance with existing agreements, Aeroports de Montreal's subsidiary is entitled to 55% of this amount, or $53.7 million Cdn ($46.1 million US). The related accounting gain is reflected in the share in the net gain of investments at equity value, which totals $36.6 million Cdn. Results Consolidated revenues were $285.2 million for fiscal 2006, an increase of $31.8 million, or 12.5%, over the previous year. Aeronautical and commercial revenues were the main contributors to this increase. Operating costs (excluding municipal taxes) were $105.7 million for the year, up $7.6 million or 7.7%, from 2005. This variance is partly due to the normal increase in operating costs following the June 2005 start-up of the new international jetty at Montreal-Trudeau. Municipal taxes were up by 9.6% for the year under review, rising to $34.1 million in fiscal 2006 from $31.1 million in 2005. This increase is attributable to Montreal-Trudeau's higher property valuation following the start-up of the new facilities that are part of the airport expansion program. ADM is the most taxed Canadian airport authority, paying up to four times more per passenger than the other major Canadian airports. Like many other companies, ADM considers EBITDA to be the best indicator for judging the Corporation's ability to meet its financial obligations. EBITDA was $117.1 million for the year under review, against $103.6 million for 2005, an increase of $13.5 million, or 13.0%. Amortization was $72.1 million in 2006, representing an increase of $7.0 million, or 10.8%, over the prior year. This increase is mainly due to the start-up of several new facilities at Montreal-Trudeau, including the international jetty (June 2005), the public international arrivals hall (December 2005) and the new multi-level parking lot (February 2006). Interest on long-term bonds totalled $68.9 million for the period under review, up $18.0 million, or 35.4%, over fiscal 2005. This variance is attributable to a decrease in the amount of capitalized interest on construction in progress, as well as the issuance of a new series of revenue bonds in September 2005. The Corporation reported an excess of revenues over expenses of $19.2 million for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2006, compared with a shortfall of $14.2 million for the prior year, an improvement of $33.4 million. This variance is mainly due to the increase in the share of earnings of Aeroports de Montreal's subsidiary (including the accounting gain resulting from the compensation awarded for the expropriation of Budapest-Ferihegy International Airport) and the higher EBITDA, all of which was offset by the increased financing expenses and amortization. Financial highlights: For the year ended December 31: ------------------------------------------------------------------- (in millions of dollars) 2006 2005 Variance (%) ------------------------------------------------------------------- Revenues 285.2 253.4 12.5 ------------------------------------------------------------------- Operating costs (excluding municipal taxes) 105.7 98.1 7.7 Municipal taxes 34.1 31.1 9.6 Rent paid to Transport Canada 21.8 20.8 4.8 Amortization 72.1 65.1 10.8 Interest on long-term bonds 68.9 50.9 35.4 ------------------------------------------------------------------- Total expenses 302.6 266.0 13.8 ------------------------------------------------------------------- Shortfall of revenues over expenses (before share of investments at equity value) (17.4) (12.6) 38.1 ------------------------------------------------------------------- ------------------------------------------------------------------- Share in the net gain (loss) of investments at equity value 36.6 (1.6) 2,387.5 ------------------------------------------------------------------- Excess (shortfall) of revenues over expenses 19.2 (14.2) 235.2 ------------------------------------------------------------------- ------------------------------------------------------------------- Cash flows from operating activities (before changes in non-cash working capital items) 46.7 49.4 (5.5) ------------------------------------------------------------------- EBITDA 117.1 103.6 13.0 ------------------------------------------------------------------- Passenger traffic Passenger traffic at Montreal-Trudeau increased by 5.0% in 2006, to a new record of 11.4 million passengers enplaned/deplaned. International traffic showed the greatest increase at 6.9%, compared with 4.7% and 3.2% for the domestic and transborder sectors respectively. Passenger traffic ---------------------------------------------------------------- ---------------------------------------------------------------- Aeroports de Montreal 2006 2005 Variance (%) ---------------------------------------------------------------- ---------------------------------------------------------------- January 903,352 895,265 0.9 February 870,153 854,276 1.9 March 997,014 930,222 7.2 ---------------------------------------------------------------- ---------------------------------------------------------------- 1st quarter 2,770,519 2,679,763 3.4 ---------------------------------------------------------------- ---------------------------------------------------------------- April 916,582 860,345 6.5 May 938,606 866,926 8.3 June 999,814 957,146 4.5 ---------------------------------------------------------------- ---------------------------------------------------------------- 2nd quarter 2,855,002 2,684,417 6.4 ---------------------------------------------------------------- ---------------------------------------------------------------- July 1,054,221 1,042,952 1.1 August 1,091,206 1,054,465 3.5 September 976,930 952,257 2.6 ---------------------------------------------------------------- ---------------------------------------------------------------- 3rd quarter 3,122,357 3,049,674 2.4 ---------------------------------------------------------------- ---------------------------------------------------------------- October 940,368 905,132 3.9 November 824,452 756,767 8.9 December 921,372 817,025 12.8 ---------------------------------------------------------------- ---------------------------------------------------------------- 4th quarter 2,686,192 2,478,924 8.4 ---------------------------------------------------------------- ---------------------------------------------------------------- Entire year 11,434,070 10,892,778 5.0 ---------------------------------------------------------------- ---------------------------------------------------------------- Source: Aeroports de Montreal, preliminary figures Aircraft movements There were a total of 235,393 aircraft movements at Aeroports de Montreal in fiscal 2006, representing a 1.5% increase over 2005. Aircraft movements at Montreal-Trudeau rose by 2.5%, to 213,468, while those at Montreal- Mirabel dropped by 7.3%, to 21,925. Aircraft movements ------------------------------------------------------------------- 2006 2005 Variance (%) ------------------------------------------------------------------- Montreal-Trudeau 213,468 208,342 2.5 ------------------------------------------------------------------- Montreal-Mirabel 21,925 23,640 (7.3) ------------------------------------------------------------------- Aeroports de Montreal 235,393 231,982 1.5 ------------------------------------------------------------------- Source: Aeroports de Montreal, preliminary figures
  6. A 45 - acre comprehensive, master planned office campus on Nuns' Island. This multi-phased office complex is geared to those tenants looking for the quality environment offered in suburban locations but with the benefits of a site located just five minutes from Montreal's central business district. Availabilities range from 50,000 sq.ft. to 500,000 sq.ft. in various configurations, all of which will be LEED certified. With the arrival of Bell Canada on Nuns' Island, public transportation has improved with investments in infrastructure being made by various governmental authorities; the neighborhood is poised for even more development. Companies such a Yellow Pages, Multi-prêt, Bombardier Recreational Products and the Bank of Canada continue to enjoy the exceptional office environment that Nuns' Island has to offer with its abundant retail offerings, bike paths, nature walks and lush landscaped public areas.
  7. Flat tax would make today's tax-filing ordeal simpler and more fair NIELS VELDHUISThe Gazette Wednesday, April 30, 2008 Today is the tax-filing deadline. As we hunkered down over our computers and waded through piles of receipts and pages of complicated forms this month, many of us rightly questioned the complexity of Canada's tax system. The total costs associated with paying personal income taxes and the cost of tax software and accounting services amount to upward of $3.9 billion a year. It need not be this way. If Canada adopted a flat tax, taxpayers could complete and file their taxes in about five minutes on a postcard-size tax form. A recent study, A Flat Tax for Canada, by tax expert and University of Stanford Professor Alvin Rabushka, proposes just that: a 15-per-cent flat tax and postcard-size tax returns for both individuals and businesses. The 15-per- cent flat tax would collect the same amount of revenue as the federal government currently collects but do so in a manner that is much less damaging and distorting. The flat tax would simplify Canada's tax code through the elimination of nearly all deductions, exemptions and credits that complicate the current tax system. For individuals, only a few basic calculations would be needed to determine the amount of tax owing or refund due. Simply add up one's income from wages, salaries, and retirement benefits; subtract the basic personal exemption (the amount of income individuals can earn tax free); and multiply the remainder by 15 per cent. Gone are the numerous and interlinked tax forms of the present personal-income-tax system; gone are the myriad of tax credits and deductions; and gone is the complicated and time-consuming paperwork. Individuals would no longer need to report income derived from such sources as dividends, capital gains, or interest, as these types of income would be taxed at their source - the business level. This means businesses would pay tax on all the income they generate except the income earned by workers. For approximately 85 per cent of Canadian taxpayers, filling out a postcard tax return would be all that is required to pay their income taxes. The self-employed and a few others would need to fill out an equally simple business tax form. For businesses, all income from the sale of goods and services would be subject to the flat tax. Deductions would be limited to the cost of materials, wages and salaries, and capital investments (buildings, equipment and land). Other income would be taxed at the same rate as individual income. Not only would a flat tax dramatically simplify the tax system, it would also have a significant impact on the Canadian economy. First, a flat tax would replace the existing four federal income-tax rates with one low rate thereby eliminating the barrier that discourages Canadians from saving, investing or working harder to earn more money. Research clearly shows that tax rates that increase as individuals earn more money through hard work act as a disincentive for such work. A flat tax would also have a significant impact on investment in Canada. Since businesses are permitted to deduct the full value of capital investments (buildings, equipment and land) in the year of purchase, the tax burden on investments would be significantly reduced and would increase the amount of investment undertaken by businesses. International evidence clearly shows that Canada would benefit greatly from a flat tax. In fact, more than 20 jurisdictions around the world, most notably Hong Kong and more recently a number of former Soviet republics, have implemented flat taxes. Hong Kong built itself into an economic giant using the flat tax as its fiscal anchor. Similarly, Slovakia, which adopted a flat tax in 2004, has since become Europe's fastest growing economy and a beacon for foreign investment. At this time of year most Canadians become frustrated at just how unwieldy, complicated, and littered with exemptions for special interests our tax code has become. Replacing Canada's personal and business income-tax system with a flat tax will save money, make everyone's taxes easier to calculate, and strengthen the Canadian economy. A few key strokes on a calculator, a minute or two to fill out a postcard return, and voilà, off to Ottawa, with love. Niels Veldhuis is director of fiscal studies at the Fraser Institute. http://www.canada.com/montrealgazette/news/editorial/story.html?id=1bf2b616-0b3e-456d-9a44-5d51eeeb04b0