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Found 14 results

  1. Six Canadian cities out of 50 have the winning combination that attract migrants * Six Canadian cities out of 50 have the winning combination that attract migrants Calgary, Waterloo, Ottawa, Vancouver, St. John’s and Richmond Hill have what migrants are looking for when choosing where to locate, according to the Conference Board’s second report assessing the attractiveness of Canadian cities. Read the report here. “Cities that fail to attract new people will struggle to stay prosperous and vibrant,” said Mario Lefebvre, Director, Centre for Municipal Studies. “These six cities come out on top across all rankings, so they appear to have an overall winning combination that is attractive to migrants. Although it would be hard to imagine a more diverse group of cities, each has particular strengths that make them magnets to newcomers, both from within Canada and abroad.” City Magnets II: Benchmarking the Attractiveness of 50 Canadian Cities, analyzes and benchmarks the features that make Canadian cities attractive to skilled workers and mobile populations. The performance of these cities is compared on 41 indicators grouped across seven categories: Society, Health, Economy, Environment, Education, Innovation, and Housing. The challenge in determining overall attractiveness is that when individuals are choosing a new city, they value attributes of city living differently. Weights were computed for each of the seven categories. For migrants with a university degree, the Education category matters the most (21 per cent) in the decision to locate, followed by Society (20 per cent), Innovation (19 per cent) and Economy (13 per cent). Migrants without a university education consider, in an overwhelming fashion, that the Economy category matters the most (33 per cent) and followed by Society (20 per cent). “In deciding where to live, university-educated migrants prefer cities with higher Education and Society outcomes. Migrants without a university education place more value on a city’s economic strength,” said Lefebvre. “However, the study shows that a city that is attractive to a certain type of migrant ends up being attractive to all, so policy makers must be cautious in crafting policies aimed at attracting university graduates only.” Overall Grades The six “A” performers – Calgary, Waterloo, Ottawa, Vancouver, St. John’s and Richmond Hill, Ont. – range between big and small cities, from the West Coast to the East Coast, and include both urban and suburban centres. Specifically: * Calgary’s strong economic results come as no surprise given its performance over the past decade, but the city also ranked first in Innovation and second in Housing. * Waterloo’s worldwide reputation for high-tech excellence in education and business is well deserved. Ranked number-one in Education, Waterloo also posted strong results in Economy, Innovation and Housing. * Ottawa reaps the benefits of a strong and well-educated public sector. The nation’s capital excels in Innovation and Education, and, apart from Health, scores well across all categories. * Richmond Hill, a fast-growing city north of Toronto, has become the second most diverse city in Canada. A well-educated workforce contributes to its high scores in the Education and Innovation categories. * Vancouver enjoys an enviable climate and a vibrancy that comes from its young, diverse, and multicultural population. * St. John’s has achieved a strong productivity level that even surpasses that of Calgary and Edmonton. It is also a stellar performer in Health and Environment categories. The “B” class includes 14 cities – Edmonton, Victoria, Markham, Vaughan, Kingston, Oakville, and Guelph are consistently in the top half of this group. The City of Toronto also earns an overall “B” grade. Although held back by lacklustre results in the Health and Environment categories (too few physicians for such a large population, and too many days of poor air quality), the City of Toronto leads all cities in the Society category, particularly the proportion of foreign-born population and the proportion of population employed in cultural occupations. In all, the Toronto census metropolitan area (CMA) obtains five of the top 14 spots. The Toronto CMA attracted 35 per cent of Canada’s immigrants (about 85,000 per year) between 2001 and 2006, but this is partly offset by migrants – 25,000 annually – leaving for other Canadian cities. London, Halifax, Lévis, Regina, Québec City, and Burlington also receive “B” grades. A total of 21 cities get “C” grades, including three of Canada’s largest urban centres: Winnipeg, Montréal, and Hamilton. Although an overall “C”, Mississauga – with its high number of immigrants – gets a “B” in attractiveness among university-educated migrants. Four of Vancouver’s suburbs – Richmond, Burnaby, Coquitlam, and Surrey – earn “C” grades, as does nearby Abbotsford. Generally, Vancouver’s suburbs lag behind in Health and Economy. Sherbrooke, Gatineau, Kitchener, Barrie, Saskatoon, Moncton, Brampton, Kelowna, Thunder Bay, Peterborough, St. Catharines, and Sudbury also get “C” grades. The “D” class includes nine small or mid-sized cities – four in Ontario: Oshawa, Brantford, Windsor, and Cambridge; four in Quebec: Longueuil, Saguenay, Trois-Rivières, and Laval, and Saint John, New Brunswick. Along with struggling economies in most cases, seven of these nine cities have shown little population growth, while the other two posted a decline in population (Saint John and Saguenay). These nine cities are also clustered near the bottom of the Innovation and Education categories. Performance By Category * Society – Canada’s largest cities post the best results, with Toronto and Montreal capturing the only two “A” grades. Toronto’s suburbs rank highly, as do Vancouver and Victoria. * Health – Small and mid-sized cities dominate this category, which mainly measures per capita access to care. Only Kingston and St. John’s get “A” grades. Vancouver and Quebec City are the only big cities to rank in the top 10. Suburban cities, which rely on services located in the urban cores, face the greatest challenges – 10 of the bottom 12 are neighbours of either Toronto, Montreal or Vancouver. * Economy – Although the rankings are based on 2006 data and pre-date the recession, the Conference Board expects cities with strong economies back then to rebound and post the strongest showing following the downturn. Calgary, Edmonton and Vaughan earn the only “A” grades in the ranking; Edmonton’s strong economy makes it particularly attractive to non-university educated migrants. Five Toronto-area suburbs make the top 10. Ottawa and Waterloo also rank in the top 10. * Environment – Seven of the eight cities in British Columbia included in this report earn “A” grades and dominate the top 10 rankings, due largely to good air quality and a mild climate. Montreal ranks last and Longueuil is also near the bottom. Mississauga, Burlington, Vaughan and Oakville also earn “D” grades. * Education – The “university towns” of Waterloo and Kingston outclass their counterparts and earn the only two “A” grades. Small and mid-sized cities dominate the results for teachers per student population, with four small Ontario cities (Burlington, Waterloo, Peterborough and Guelph) grabbing all the “A” grades on this indicator. * Innovation – Calgary, Richmond Hill and Ottawa get “As” for Innovation. Cities with broad manufacturing or resource-based economies generally fare less well in this category. * Housing – Small and mid-sized cities generally do the best in this category, thanks in particular to relatively affordable housing. The Quebec City suburb of Lévis leads all cities, and five other Quebec cities rank in the top 10. The opposite is true for all eight B.C. cities, where homes are generally expensive. As a result, these cities fall in the bottom half of the rankings and five of them, including Victoria and the Lower Mainland cities, get “D” grades. http://www.muchmormagazine.com/2010/01/six-canadian-cities-out-of-50-have-the-winning-combination-that-attract-migrants/
  2. Check this out! Ce site vient de gagner un prix prestigieux en innovation à Chicago. http://www.everyblock.com/ Peut-être viendront-ils au Canada dans quelques années?
  3. Montréal est 20ieme dans la liste de 20 villes. Challengers to Silicon Valley include New York, L.A., Boston, Tel Aviv, and London. RICHARD FLORIDA @Richard_Florida http://www.citylab.com/tech/2015/07/the-worlds-leading-startup-cities/399623/?utm_source=SFFB sent via Tapatalk
  4. Déterminée à diversifier son offre dans le secteur du traitement des eaux, la compagnie de Québec fait l'achat d'Itasca Systems. Pour en lire plus...
  5. Le PDG sortant, le cofondateur Guy Goulet, demeure président du conseil d'administration. Il portera une attention particulière au développement des affaires. Pour en lire plus...
  6. Montréal: Canada’s innovation epicenter Posted on November 21st, 2007 by Mitch Brisebois Where do Canada’s innovators live? Mostly Montréal. Followed by Ottawa. A quick database search of The US Patent and Trademark Office reveals that 4,931 granted patents are held by inventors living in Montreal. Ottawa-based inventors offer up 3,402 patents. Here’s a coast to coast breakdown of the top 10 major centers: Montréal - 4,931 Ottawa - 3,402 Toronto - 3,187 Vancouver - 2,407 Calgary - 1,598 Edmonton - 1,293 Quebec City - 702 Winnipeg - 696 Saskatoon - 470 St. John’s - 117 These are respectable enough numbers. But… consider New York City: 22,571 patents.
  7. We are living through a great turning point in world history. In just a few short months, our economy and our society are on their way to being transformed. The U.S. and Canadian stock exchanges have lost as much as a third of their value. Gone are the days when regions will grow wealthy from ephemeral finance capital. Only those that build their real economy from the only true capital we possess - the creative energy of our people - will enjoy sustainable prosperity. Gone, too, are the days when one's identity can be purchased literally off the shelf through designer brands and a Sex and the City lifestyle. Times are tight, credit is no longer freely available, and the house is no longer an infinite piggy bank that can be used to finance luxury consumption. The regions that will succeed and be attractive are those that offer history, authenticity and realism - and where the price tag is more affordable. Montreal is well positioned not just to weather the economic storm but to flourish in the long run. The city and its surrounding region have underlying economic and social capacities which, if properly harnessed, will position them to develop a truly sustainable prosperity and perhaps to serve as a model for other regions in Canada. By no means am I trying to pooh-pooh the problems facing Montreal. Some of them stem from external economic forces, while others are self-inflicted - and I'll get to them in a moment. But Montreal has not just the opportunity but the obligation - to itself, Canada and the world - to lead the way out of the current financial crisis. With credit tight and in some cases unavailable, the real economy, real people and real creativity replace finance capital as the new coin of the realm. Montreal has this in spades. My research shows that more than a third of the region's workforce comes from the creative class - scientists, technology workers, entertainers, artists and designers, as well as managers and financial types - putting it in the top 10 per cent of all regions in North America, and a global leader as well. Nearly a fifth of the Montreal region's workforce forms a super-creative core made up of the techies plus cultural and entertainment types. Some years ago, when I conducted a study of Montreal's creative economy with colleagues Kevin Stolarick and Lou Musante, we identified the region's unique capacity to blend arts and culture with engineering and technology, and to combine that with street-level creativity energy. We were convinced the region would benefit from its ability to generate "spill-acrosses" between companies and industries, driving powerful creative economic engines. And look now at its video-game and movie production industries, at the burgeoning music scene, at the Cirque du Soleil. Montreal also benefits from its dense, compact geography. Most experts agree that innovation and productivity are driven by density, and Montreal ranks third among all North American cities in average population density. Montreal is a real and authentic place - perhaps the most authentic city in North America. It mostly avoided, and certainly did not suffer from, the insanely out-of-control, finance-powered new-wealth spiral, Gatsby-esque lifestyles and real-estate bubbles seen in places like New York, London, Miami and L.A. Its genuineness and history are in sync with the social and economic pendulum's swing away from opulence and hyper-consumption. People today, especially creative people, are looking for authentic creative places that are affordable and allow them the openness and social space to do their work. Urban thinker Jane Jacobs long ago said that "new ideas require old buildings." Montreal has old buildings in spades, many of them in stunning historic neighbourhoods. These attributes contributed greatly to Montreal today having one of the most innovative music scenes in the world with bands like Arcade Fire, Wolf Parade, Islands and Sunset Rubdown. It has attracted not just local musical talent, but musicians from all over the world. As Arcade Fire frontman Win Butler told the British newspaper The Guardian last year: "I felt like I discovered Montreal ... There's this great weird city, and it's full of arts and culture, and I was so shocked. A year in Boston, nothing. I come to Montreal, and I had a performing band straight away. It's hard not to think of it as fate that I found myself there." The region's personality predisposes it to innovation and creativity. Regions, like people, can be sorted across five basic personality types, according to Cambridge University psychologist Jason Rentfrow. For example, Chicago is an extroverted city. Atlanta is agreeable, Indianapolis is conscientious, and Boston is neurotic. Montreal is an open-to-experience region. Like New York and San Francisco, the city craves new experiences. Such regions, like open-to-experience people, may appear a little aloof or introverted and at times a bit prickly, but they are the source of innovation and a springboard for human creativity. They are magnets for those who may not fit into more conventional surroundings, but want to express themselves and try new things. Open-to-experience cities have higher rates of innovation and new business formation. Creativity requires openness to self-expression, and it requires diversity. My own research - along with that of world values expert Ronald Inglehart - has found that a society's openness to gays and lesbians is linked to overall happiness, technological innovation and economic well-being. These are things etched in Montreal's very DNA. In fact, Montreal tops our new ranking of Canadian regions on the gay and lesbian index. It ranks sixth on our bohemian index. The Gay Village and festivals such as DiversCité are visible evidence of this openness. Montreal has a broad structural economic advantage in being part of the fifth-largest mega-region in North America and 12th-largest in the world. The future will be defined by the mega-regions - urban agglomerations that reach far beyond a single core city and its suburbs, and that host business and economic activity on a massive scale. The 40 most important "megas" house 17 per cent of the global population, but account for two-thirds of its economic activity and more than 90 per cent of innovation. Montreal is part of a mega-region that stretches through Ottawa to Toronto and out to Kitchener-Waterloo, and south to Rochester and Buffalo. Home to more than 20 million people, this economic powerhouse produces more than half a trillion dollars in annual economic output, making it one of the leading mega-regions driving the world economy. Montreal also abuts a second, even larger mega-region: "Bos-Wash" stretches from Boston through New York to Washington, D.C., and has more than 50 million people and more than $2 trillion in economic activity. That makes it the second largest mega-region in the world, larger than most countries. This positions Montreal as a key node in one of the world's largest and most formidable economic centres. All these factors have resulted in real successes. For the Canadian edition of my book Who's Your City?, my colleague Kevin Stolarick ranked the nation's cities on their suitability across five key life stages: recent university graduates, young professionals, families with children, empty-nesters and retirees. Montreal ranked in the top five in every category and performed even better when housing affordability was accounted for. And a recent global ranking by Monocle Magazine named Montreal among the world's 20 best cities. Still, Montreal struggles with substantial challenges and obstacles. There is the high dropout rate in secondary schools, the low level of college graduates, the crumbling infrastructure, and the legacy of lingusitic and cultural tension. They must be addressed head-on if Montreal is to realize its full potential. In fact, these obstacles and challenges have been in place for a long time, setting in motion a kind of institutional and civic sclerosis that keeps the city and region from doing better. Montreal is not alone in this; many, if not most, regions in the world have their own sorts of paralysis. The point is we are in the midst of a historic turning point set in motion by the financial crisis. Those regions that can overcome the internal issues holding them back and can capitalize on their creativity and economic assets have powerful first-mover advantages that will position them for long-run economic advantage and sustainable prosperity. Right now Montreal is wasting a lot of human creative energy. The city still has a very high number of people with low incomes, many living on social assistance. It has a high school dropout rate of nearly a third. This is not just a social problem; it's an economic issue that leads to lower rates of productivity and growth. The region also has lagged on what we call human capital accumulation, with one of the lowest levels of post-secondary education despite having the lowest tuition in Canada. But it has the great advantage of being home to four universities, one of the biggest higher-education sectors of any city. And it has a fluidity across class lines. It needs to use these advantages. It needs to develop a broad regional initiative to tap and harness the creative energy of all, giving these young people and those on social assistance the motivation to use their talents and participate in the creative economy. It has to make this a priority. Montreal can take a cue not from economic development policy but from its own Cirque du Soleil, which combines the talents of circus performers and street musicians with those of designers and engineers. It can also learn from the world's most successful manufacturing company, Toyota. Long ago when I studied Toyota, its top managers told me point -blank that they would beat the Big Three U.S. automakers for one simple reason: While the Big Three gave super-rewards to their CEOs, MBAs and top engineers, Toyota worked day in and day out to harness the collective creativity of every worker on the factory floor. Imagine if Montreal could become the world's first region to tap the creativity of all its people. This is not just a key challenge for Montreal; it's the key challenge of our time. It's here that Montreal can forge a real global leadership position and develop a new sustainable model for economic development: by extending the creative class far beyond a creative elite, and by stipulating that it will no longer waste either its natural resources or its human talent. Creativity is in the region's DNA. More than just about any other region, Montreal has the underlying capacity to broaden the reach of the creative economy to service business, manufacturing plants, and even agriculture. But the city and the region need a government that can help get them there. Governmental structures in Montreal and most other places are not up to the task. They are fractured and fragmented and filled with contradictions - complicated and clumsy. Hardly anyone who isn't involved full-time can understand them. In Montreal, there are local boroughs, municipalities, the agglomeration council, and a regional administration as well. I saw similarly overbearing structures in Pittsburgh, Washington, D.C., and many other places. It leads to what people in Montreal call "immobilisme" - the tendency for nothing significant to happen because governments, business, social groups and unions are so at odds and so stuck in their ways that no one can provide clear direction and make anything happen. Many people say a strong leader is the answer. They look back to Mayor Jean Drapeau and the successes of Expo 67 and other landmark projects. They ask what's happened and worry that Montreal has become gun-shy. How does the region get its mojo back? But today's regions are too complicated for top-down, single-leader strategies. The key is to create a broad shared vision that can mobilize the energy of many groups - an open-source approach that can harness the energy and ideas of networks of people. Some may say the region needs a large-scale marketing or branding campaign to overcome this legacy. In the creative age, the best marketing is viral. Here's a simple suggestion: Capitalize on the region's growing music scene and audio identity. Pop Montreal, for example, has emerged as one of freshest and most offbeat musical festivals in the world. Where else could Burt Bacharach share buzz with an up-and-coming indie band like Black Kids? Where some music festivals rent hotel ballrooms and other traditional venues, Pop Montreal used the Notman House. Still, the festival is largely unknown outside the mega-region. Montreal should follow the lead of Austin, Tex., home of the famed South by Southwest music and media festival, and transform Pop Montreal into a magnet for the most innovative music acts, blogs and talent scouting. That would extend the region's reputation as a creative centre, virally and organically. This is just an example of the general principle; many other organizations, festivals and events can be marshalled in similar fashion. This kind of vision must go beyond Montreal per se and extend to the entire mega-region. That's a tall order, but a necessary one, and there are signs it can be done. The positive relationship between Premier Jean Charest and his Ontario counterpart, Dalton McGuinty, has been widely reported. It has even been jokingly referred to as a burgeoning "bromance." Provincial governments have authority over transportation, environmental and educational policies. Why not work together to build a powerful vibrant mega-region from Montreal through Ottawa and Toronto and down into the U.S. as a world example of cross-jurisdictional and cross-border co-operation, putting in place the transit infrastructure of high-speed rail, addressing environmental and natural resources issues, and harnessing the broad talent and skills of the workforce on this massive geographic scale? But to be successful in these areas, provinces need to recognize that transportation and environmental systems are more faithful to economic boundaries than to provincial ones. That brings me to perhaps the toughest issue of all. Montreal has been the focal point of a long history of linguistic, cultural and political issues that have held back the city and the province. On one hand, bilingualism is a huge advantage in the global economy. On the other, language laws and the threat of separation have scared people and businesses away and continue to discourage some companies from investing. The region can ill afford to lapse into historic battles. It needs to overcome its past and use its uniquely French heritage and bilingualism to its advantage. Montreal must continue to work on making linguistic diversity into a strength rather than a weakness. Recent events put us at a pivotal point - one that provides once-in-a-lifetime opportunities for Montreal. Now it's up to the region's leadership and people to develop a vision of how to overcome the challenges and obstacles of the past. Montreal can be a model for how to flourish in the new era of financial and economic turbulence.
  8. Vancouver Becomes First City to Pave Its Streets With Recycled Plastic Read more: Vancouver Becomes First City to Pave Their Streets With Recycled Plastic | Inhabitat - Sustainable Design Innovation, Eco Architecture, Green Building by Kristine Lofgren, 11/25/12 http://inhabitat.com/vancouver-becomes-first-city-to-pave-their-streets-with-recycled-plastic/ The City of Vancouver has set the lofty goal of becoming the greenest city in the world by 2020 and, judging by their latest green innovation, they are thinking outside of the box to get there. To help up their green quotient, Vancouver has started paving its streets with recycled plastic. The city teamed up with GreenMantra of Toronto to melt together old plastic and asphalt to create a paving mixture that is much better for the environment than traditional asphalt. Traditional asphalt requires extremely high temperatures to allow it to flow easily, but by mixing in a recycled plastic binder, the asphalt flows at a much lower temperature, requiring up to 20-percent less fuel to produce. City engineer Peter Judd estimates that this could translate into a reduction of 300 tons of greenhouse gases per year. Using the plastic binder also reduces the amount of vapors released into the air when the asphalt is laid. The process costs about 1 to 3-percent more than traditional asphalt paving, but as the supply increases, costs are expected to drop. The environmentally friendly paving doesn’t look any different than traditional paving, and the city is currently testing the mixture before deploying it citywide.
  9. Read more: RMIT Swanston Academic Building’s Pixelated Facade Remixes the Melbourne Skyline Lyons RMIT Swanston Academic Bldg – Inhabitat - Sustainable Design Innovation, Eco Architecture, Green Building Nicely done RMIT. I think this might be the only building, that actually has that kind of design/thinking behind it.
  10. Un excellent regard sur la densité. Ceux qui s'intéressent à l'urbanisme, à l'architecture et la conception des villes aimeront cet article! Bref, la densité, ce n'est pas une question de tours.
  11. MONTREAL, March 29 /CNW Telbec/ - Mr. Michel Leblanc, President and CEO of the Board of Trade of Metropolitan Montreal, is pleased to invite media representatives to the Strategic Forum of the Board of Trade, which will focus on major projects in Montréal, on Wednesday, March 30, 2011, at 7:30 a.m. With the Mayor of Montréal, Gérald Tremblay, to be on hand, along with a number of experts and nearly 500 participants, this unique event will enable to learn more about how various key and shaping Montréal projects are advancing. The major development projects will be on-hand: The Montréal of tomorrow, an overview of the city's major projects Emilio Imbriglio, Partner, Raymond Chabot Grant Thornton TOWARDS MAJOR PRIVATE PROJECTS The impact of condo development on the Montréal landscape Jacques Vincent, Co-President, Prével Urban renewal, from Angus to Quadrilatere Saint-Laurent: The need for a territorial approach Christian Yaccarini, President and CEO, Angus Development Corporation The Windsor sector: Major developments for the Bell Centre and its surrounding area Salvatore Iacono, Senior Vice President, Development, Eastern Canada, Cadillac Fairview Corporation Ltd. LARGE-SCALE HEALTH INFRASTRUCTURES Sainte-Justine UHC - Grandir en santé: Innovation in personalized medicine for mothers and children Dr. Fabrice Brunet, Executive Director, Sainte-Justine University Hospital Center MUHC Normand Rinfret, Associate Executive Director and COO McGill University Health Centre The Jewish General Hospital Dr. Hartley Stern, Executive Director, Jewish General Hospital and Philippe Castiel, Director of Planning and Real Estate Development, Jewish General Hospital CHUM Christian Paire, Executive Director, Centre hospitalier de l'Université de Montréal MAJOR INSTITUTIONAL PROJECTS A space for life Charles-Mathieu Brunelle, Executive Director, Montréal's Nature Museums The UdeM's Outremont Campus Guy Breton, Rector, Université de Montréal The Innovation District: Progress report and guidelines for its implementation Yves Beauchamp, Director General, École de technologie supérieure and Heather Munroe-Blum, Principal and Vice-Chancellor, McGill University The redevelopment of the CBC/Radio-Canada site Maryse Bertrand, Vice-President, Real Estate, Legal Services, and General Counsel CBC/Société Radio-Canada The Quartier des spectacles Jean-Robert Choquet, Director, Department of Culture and Heritage, Ville de Montréal and Stéphane Ricci, Coordinator, Quartier des spectacles project, Ville de Montréal The Silo No. 5 and the Bassins du Nouveau Havre: Major revitalization projects for Montréal Cameron Charlebois, Vice-President, Real Estate, Quebec, Canada Lands Company Date: Wednesday, March 30, 2011 Time: From 7:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Where: Palais des congrès de Montréal 1001 place Jean-Paul Riopelle Room 710 The Board of Trade of Metropolitan Montreal has some 7,000 members. Its primary mission is to represent the interests of the business community of Greater Montréal and to provide individuals, merchants, and businesses of all sizes with a variety of specialized services to help them achieve their full potential in terms of innovation, productivity and competitiveness. The Board of Trade is Quebec's leading private economic development organization. Contacts RSVP with Sylvie Paquette Advisor Media Relations by phone at 514 871-4000 ext. 4015 or by email at [email protected]
  12. NEARLY $630 MILLION IN FOREIGN INVESTMENT AND TWO NEW INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS ATTRACTED; HELP TO OVER 1,000 SKILLED FOREIGN WORKERS TO ESTABLISH IN GREATER MONTRÉAL MONTREAL, April 15 /CNW Telbec/ - On the occasion of its 14th Annual Meeting held today with 200 members and partners attending, Montréal International (MI) presented its results for the year 2009. Among the highlights were the metropolitan economic development organization's success in contributing to attract nearly $630 million in foreign investment, two new international organizations and over 1,000 skilled foreign workers into Greater Montréal. On the innovation front, MI supported five promising projects in high-tech industries in Metropolitan Montréal. As for promoting the region's advantages on the international stage, some 40 activities were undertaken in foreign markets. At the event - which welcomed Mr. André Lauzon, Executive Producer and Head of Electronic Arts Mobile Montréal as guest speaker - the Acting President and CEO of Montréal International, Mr. Luc Lacharité, emphasized: "The competence and dedication of MI's staff, combined with the support and collaboration of the organization's members and partners, once again has generated further substantial benefits for the metropolitan region's economic competitiveness and international status, in spite of difficult world economic conditions." Foreign investment In 2009, MI helped attract $626.3 million in foreign investment into Greater Montréal. This investment, nearly three-quarters of which is in high-technology sectors and will create or maintain over 2,900 jobs in the metropolitan region, comes 56% from North America, 32% from Europe and 12% from Asia. A further indicator of the added value of MI's results is that over half (55.3%) of the projects were new set-ups. International organizations In terms of attracting international organizations (IOs), the MI 2009 Activity Report mentions the decision of two IOs to set up in Montréal, as well as the official opening of the secretariats of two other IOs in the metropolis. Various international promotional and networking activities were also organized among the IOs community during the year. Skilled foreign workers In 2009, the International Mobility team handled 1,025 files of skilled foreign workers on behalf of 262 businesses, institutions and international organizations in Greater Montréal. In total, 1,784 individuals benefited from MI help and career counselling to settle in the region. The impact of this specialized foreign workforce is very positive for Greater Montréal, as their combined earnings will represent more than $155 million over three years. This qualified workforce also boosts the region's expertise in key sectors. Innovation Last year, MI supported five promising projects in innovation development in Greater Montréal: - Research and innovation initiative in computer-generated images, a Québec Film and Television Council project; - Mobility Alliance, a TechnoMontréal project in cooperation with Alliance numérique to develop and market new applications and new content for mobile platforms; - ScienceAffaires meetings, in cooperation with the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC), a pilot project to maximize sharing among scientists, artists, economic development players and the business world; - A market intelligence study in the medical drug sector, in cooperation with the Québec Consortium for Drug Discovery (CDQM); - The 2009 Aerospace Innovation Forum, organized by Aéro Montréal. International promotion of Greater Montréal At the top of the list of MI's key promotional achievements in 2009 is its upgraded website. The 2009-2010 edition of "Greater Montréal's Attractiveness Indicators" has also drawn keen interest. This annual MI publication also won an APDEQ (Québec Association of Economic Development Professionals) award in the best information tool category. Lastly, numerous promotional events were organized last year, including a mission to New York in which MI partners participated. MI Board of Directors The 2010-2011 Board of Directors of Montréal International is made up of the following members (N=new member, R=renewal): Private Sector Members: - Mr. Luc Benoît, President, AECOM Tecsult; - Mr. André Boulanger, President, Hydro-Québec Distribution ®; - Mr. Jean-Jacques Bourgeault, Vice Chairman of the Board, Montréal International, and Corporate Director; - Mr. Pierre Brunet, Chairman of the Board of Directors, Montréal International, and Corporate Director; - Mr. Renaud Caron, Principal Vice President, Strategic Development, CGI Group; - Me C. Stephen Cheasley, Treasurer, Montréal International, and Partner, Fasken Martineau ®; - Mr. James C. Cherry, President and Chief Executive Officer, Aéroports de Montréal ®; - Mr. Richard Filion, Director General, Dawson College, and President, Regroupement des collèges du Montréal métropolitain (Metropolitan Montréal College Alliance); - Mr. Michel Guay, Chairman of the Board, TechnoMontréal ®; - Mr. Luc Lacharité, Acting President and Chief Executive Officer, Montréal International; - Mr. Guy LeBlanc, Managing Partner, Montréal Office, PricewaterhouseCoopers (N); - Me David McAusland, Partner, McCarthy Tétrault ®; - Mr. Andrew T. Molson, Vice Chairman, Molson Coors Brewing Company ®; - Mr. Marc Parent, President of the Board of Directors, Aéro Montréal, and President and Chief Executive Officer, CAE; - Ms. Louise Roy, Chancellor, Université de Montréal, Chair of the Board, Conseil des arts de Montréal, and Cirano invited Fellow ®; - Mr. Jean-Pierre Sauriol, President and CEO, Dessau; - Mr. Hubert Thibault, Vice President - Institutional Affairs, Fédération des caisses Desjardins du Québec ®; - Ms. Sylvie Vachon, President and Chief Executive Officer, Montréal Port Authority ®; - Dr. Judith Woodsworth, President, Concordia University. Public sector Representatives: - Mr. Michael Applebaum, Mayor of the Borough of Côte-des-Neiges - Notre-Dame-de-Grâce, Vice Chair of the Executive Committee of the City of Montréal, responsible for Services to citizens, Relations with the Boroughs and Housing, Member of the Agglomeration Council and the Board of Directors of the Communauté métropolitaine de Montréal (CMM) (N); - Mr. Richard Deschamps, Member of the Executive Committee, responsible for Major Projects 2025, Economic development, Infrastructures and Roads, City Councillor, LaSalle Borough, City of Montréal ®; - Mr. Claude Haineault, Mayor of the City of Beauharnois ®; - Mr. Luis Miranda, Mayor of the Anjou Borough, City of Montréal ®; - Ms. Sylvie Parent, Member of the Executive Committee, City of Longueuil ®; - Mr. Jean-Marc Robitaille, Mayor of the City of Terrebonne and Warden of MRC Des Moulins ®; - Mr. Jean Séguin, Sous-ministre adjoint à la Métropole, Ministère des Affaires municipales, des Régions et de l'Occupation du territoire (MAMROT); - Mr. Gérald Tremblay, Mayor of the City of Montréal and President of the Board, Communauté métropolitaine de Montréal (CMM) ®; - Ms. Rita Tremblay, Vice President, Policy and Planning, Canada Economic Development for Québec Regions; - Mr. Gilles Vaillancourt, Mayor of the City of Laval and Vice President of the Board, Communauté métropolitaine de Montréal (CMM) ®. A full report of Montréal International's 2009 activities is available on its website: http://www.montrealinternational.com. About Montréal International Montréal International (MI) was created in 1996 as a result of a private/public partnership. Its mission is to contribute to the economic development of metropolitan Montréal and to enhance its international status. Its mandates include attracting foreign investment, international organizations and qualified workers, supporting the development of innovation and metropolitan clusters, and promoting the competitive and international environment of Greater Montréal. Montréal International is funded by the private sector, the Communauté métropolitaine de Montréal (Montréal Metropolitan Community), the City of Montréal and the Governments of Canada and Québec. Since its creation, Montréal International has helped to attract more than $7.5 billion in foreign investment to Greater Montréal. From these investments, more than 43 000 jobs have been created or maintained. To date, MI's activities have also allowed more than 25 international organizations to establish themselves in the city and attract more than 4 000 qualified foreign workers. To learn more, please visit MI Web site at: http://www.montrealinternational.com. For further information: Benoît Lefèvre, Communications Advisor, Montréal International, (514) 987-9323, [email protected] http://www.newswire.ca/en/releases/archive/April2010/15/c2834.html