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Found 8 results

  1. D'après moi, la majorité de ces propriétés n'ont pas vraiment de grand valeur architectural. Particulièment l'Agora Charles Daudelin (beaucoup de vagabonds vivent dedans,,,) Le Secteur Paper Hill aussi est seulement ordinare, et le site a un grand potentiel. Le Planétarium aussi n'est rien de spéciale, et peu faire place a une future construction en hauteur aussi.
  2. Updated - Oct 26 http://forum.skyscraperpage.com/showthread.php?t=174954 Yikes... Espérons que Altitude Montréal commence bientot!
  3. TOP 50 NORTH AMERICAN SPORTS CITIES By TIM BAINES Thu, October 9, 2008 It's not just about championships. Our Best Sports City rankings, which look at the 12 months from roughly October 2007 to October 2008, are based on point values assigned to various categories, including but not limited to won-lost records, postseason appearances, applicable power ratings, number of teams and attendance. For more, see the new edition of , which is on newsstands this week. --- TOP 50 NORTH AMERICAN SPORTS CITIES 1. Boston 2. Detroit + Ann Arbor 3. Dallas-Fort Worth 4. New York 5. Philadelphia 6. Phoenix + Tempe 7. Denver + Boulder 8. Los Angeles 9. Chicago + Evanston 10. Washington 11. Pittsburgh 12. Houston 13. Tampa-St. Petersburg 14. Nashville 15. Lawrence, Kan. 16. Cleveland 17. Anaheim 18. Minneapolis-St. Paul 19. Atlanta 20. Salt Lake City + Provo 21. San Jose + Palo Alto + Santa Clara 22. Miami 23. Indianapolis 24. Raleigh-Durham-Chapel Hill, N.C. 25. Morgantown, W.Va. 26. New Orleans 27. San Diego 28. Cincinnati 29. Knoxville, Tenn. 30. Orlando 31. Austin, Tex. 32. Seattle 33. San Antonio 34. Toronto 35. Charlotte 36. Oakland + Berkeley 37. Green Bay 38. Milwaukee 39. Jacksonville 40. St. Louis 41. Montreal 42. Buffalo 43. Baltimore 44. Columbus 45. Baton Rouge, La. 46. Calgary 47. Norman, Okla. 48. Ottawa 49. San Francisco 50. Portland http://www.sportingnews.com/yourturn/viewtopic.php?t=468401
  4. "Alice in Lark Land" http://www.oldcarbrochures.com/static/NA/Studebaker/1962_Studebaker/1962-Alice%20in%20Lark%20Land/dirindex.html I especially like "when you get a flat, pull over to the side of the road, put on fresh lipstick, get out, wave and look helpless and feminine" (p. 15) (I like this one since it is so true ) I also like "when driving on an expressway, use distractions like the radio" For context, it seems to have been a booklet supplied with the Studebaker Lark for '62. It was a popular car with ladies as the car was small, and also Studebakers had a feature that held the brake for you on a hill, so that starting the car off from a stop on a grade was a trivial operation, which made them attractive to feeble drivers.
  5. un nouveau projet sur le mont royal, je pense. sur le chemin de la côte-des-neige, en face de la cimetière côte-des-neige. j'ai visité le bureau de vente, c'est trés beau, haute-gamme. http://www.foresthillcondos.ca
  6. http://forum.skyscraperpage.com/showthread.php?t=178092 Wow, say what you want about Heritage Montreal, the CCA, Les Amis de la Montagne and the OCPM, but this would never be allowed to happen here.
  7. As The Hill reports, Royal Jordanian posted on Twitter Monday that “following instructions from the concerned U.S. departments, we kindly inform our dearest passengers departing to and arriving from the United States that carrying any electronic or electrical device on board the flight cabins is strictly prohibited." http://www.zerohedge.com/sites/default/files/images/user3303/imageroot/2017/03/15/20170319_jordan.jpg
  8. La citadelle d'Alep domine la ville, c'est un palais royal construit en 1230 et en partie détruit par les Mongols. Elle est entourée d'un profond (20 m) et large (30 m) fossé, creusé au xiie siècle. L'une des caractéristiques de la citadelle est son imposante entrée fortifiée, accessible par un pont. Cette entrée a été construite par les Mamelouks au xvie siècle. À l'intérieur, une succession de cinq virages à angle droit et trois imposantes portes en acier, dont certaines possèdent des linteaux sculptés, opposaient autant d'obstacles à un assaut. Il faut visiter en particulier la salle d'armes, la salle byzantine et la salle du trône dont le plafond de bois décoré a été restauré. Il y a une vue depuis l'enceinte. The Citadel of Aleppo (Arabic: قلعة حلب‎) is a large medieval fortified palace in the centre of the old city of Aleppo, northern Syria. It is considered to be one of the oldest and largest castles in the world. Usage of the Citadel hill dates back at least to the middle of the 3rd millennium BC. Subsequently occupied by many civilizations including the Greeks, Byzantines, Ayyubids and Mamluks, the majority of the construction as it stands today is thought to originate from the Ayyubid period. An extensive conservation work has taken place in the 2000s by the Aga Khan Trust for Culture in collaboration with Aleppo Archeological Society. The recently-discovered Temple of the Ancient Storm God, Hadad, dates use of the hill to the middle of the 3rd millennium BC, as referenced in Cuneiform texts from Ebla and Mari.[1] The prophet Abraham is said to have milked his sheep on the citadel hill[2]. After the decline of the Neo-Hittite state centred in Aleppo, the Assyrians dominated the area (4-8th century BC), followed by the Neo-Babylonians and the Persians (539-333)[3]. [edit] Seleucid After Aleppo was taken by the armies of Alexander the Great, Aleppo was ruled by Seleucus I Nicator, who undertook the revival of the city under the name Beroia. Medieval Arab historians say that the history of the citadel as a fortified acropolis began under Nikator[2]. In some areas of the citadel there are up to two meters of remains of Hellenistic settlement. A colonnaded street led up to the citadel hill from the west, where the souk area of Aleppo still retains the Hellenistic grid street plan.[4] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Citadel_of_Aleppo