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Found 9 results

  1. Prosperity gap to widen, Conference Board says Growth in Quebec expected to hit 1.4% DAVID AKIN, Canwest News Service Published: 8 hours ago Booming Saskatchewan will lead all provinces in economic growth this year, while Ontario and Quebec will suffer through a difficult year, said forecasters at the Conference Board of Canada. The widening prosperity gap between the West and those in central and eastern Canada presents federal policy-makers with some unique challenges. The West may need policies that slow growth and curb inflation, while central Canada has few inflationary worries but needs some economic stimulus to encourage growth. In its semi-annual provincial outlook, the Conference Board says Saskatchewan's economy is booming thanks to surging commodity prices, particularly oil and potash, and as a result, the provincial economy there will grow by 4.2 per cent this year. In fact, the Conference Board said workers are leaving Alberta and heading to Saskatchewan to make their fortune. The report says that, as a result, retailers in Canada's flattest province may be in for a particularly good year. "The positive labour outlook, combined with lofty wage gains, is spurring a spending spree. Retail sales are expected to soar by 12.2 per cent in 2008," it said. Meanwhile, in Quebec, things will be a bit better this year, where growth of 1.4 per cent is expected. "Since the middle of 2007, the Quebec economy has been at a near standstill. The weakness in the manufacturing sector has eroded economic gains made in other industries,' the report said. Next door in Ontario, where manufacturers had particular trouble coping with the one-two punch of a fast-rising loonie and skyrocketing energy prices, economic growth will be just 0.8 per cent, the Conference Board said. Only Newfoundland and Labrador will see slower economic growth than Ontario this year. After a stellar year in 2007 with double-digit economic growth, the Conference Board said the pace in Canada's most eastern province is stalled. It predicts growth there of just 0.2 per cent this year. Overall, the Conference Board believes Canada's economy will grow by 1.7 per cent. The forecasters at the independent think-tank are much more optimistic than the Bank of Canada, which said last month it believes Canada's economy will grow by one per cent.
  2. For a while now I have been thinking about how Canada would be like, if we actually had a decent size population. I found an article from the Globe and Mail from a few years ago, saying we should really consider increasing the number of immigrants coming to this country. How do we get 1.9 million new people to move to Canada and live here, each and every year? Yes, the current major cities like Toronto and Montreal will continue to grow, but we should find ways to get other cities to grow also. If we did manage to get to 100,000,000 people living in Canada by 2050, we would have a density of 10 people per sq.km. That would be almost similar to present day Russia (excl. the annexation of Crimea). The US has 35 people per sq.km. With that we would see Canada explode to well over 300 million people. Yes it would be a lot of more mouths to feed. Plus we would need a rapid expansion in new urban centers across the provinces and especially the territories. We would also need to develop/revitalize current industries and create new industries. I know the energy (petrol) and mining sectors are in the toilet, but if we managed to increase the population, we would probably bring those industries back to life. We may be able to finally fly Montreal to Vancouver or within this country for cheaper or drive through the Prairies and be bored out of our minds or even driving all the way to Iqaluit and not worry about the gas tank, seeing there may be a station close by and not 1000's of km away. Also we can finally see many of the national parks and provincial/territorial parks, that are inaccessible and costs 10s of thousands of to visit. The reason I bring up the territories, they are grossly under populated. If there are more people there and more towns/cities connecting them to the south, the cost of living there will decrease. Plus by 2050-2100, more people will be moving north because of climate change. I found one agency formulate by 2050, we would see Canada's population grow to well under 50 million, we would be one of the wealthiest per capita, but our GDP would be lower. If we could increase the population to 100 million and also find a way to still have a similar GDP per capita as the one forecast for 2050 with 50 million, we would be the 4th wealthiest instead of the 17th. It is a long shot and I know Canada has a lot to do before that time, but we should really think about the future of this country.
  3. À l'Exception de quelques geeks et financiers, peut de gens ici connaissent le concept du Bitcoin (Monnaie web open-source, sans banque, sans gouvernement attaché), même les médias traditionnels n'en parle pas du tout, pourtant, Montréal semble vouloir devenir une mini capitale de cet argent virtuel, selon un forum important du sujet. Source: Bitcointalk We are excited about the interest building around the establishment of the Bitcoin Embassy in Montreal and we have been working hard, putting together a team and organizing as we prepare to officially open our doors. The Bitcoin Embassy will serve as a hub where everything Bitcoin related will be given the opportunity to have it’s place under the same roof. We have in mind ; a bitcoin store / museum, a place for meet-ups, conferences, educational sessions, startup / venture capital center, everything that can help grow and promote Bitcoin throughout the Montreal community. Our goal is to make this city an international location for existing Bitcoin enthusiasts and future adopters alike. Join us at our next meet-up planned for Saturday, August 17th, 2013 at 2:30pm at the Bitcoin Embassy offices located at: 3485 St-Laurent Boul. Montreal. We look forward to discuss, plan and get people involved in the next phases of this exciting new project! Please get in touch with us at [email protected] Qui "Donne" un espace dans un endroit important comme St-Laurent? Beaucoup de commentaire sur Reddit /r/Montreal sur les connexions malveillantes du projet
  4. Canada sees surprising job gains in August Financial Post September 4, 2009 Canada posted a surprising gain in employment in August as the economy showed signs that it was pulling out of a recession. Canada posted a surprising gain in employment in August as the economy showed signs that it was pulling out of a recession. Photograph by: File, AFP/Getty Images OTTAWA — Canada posted a surprising gain in employment in August as the economy showed signs that it was beginning to pull out of a recession. Statistics Canada said Friday that 27,100 positions were added during the month, compared with 44,500 losses in July. The unemployment rate edged up to 8.7 per cent in August from 8.6 per cent the previous month. The gains were led by part-time and private-sector employment, the federal agency said. There were 30,600 part-time jobs added in August, while 3,500 full-time positions were lost. Hardest hit was the manufacturing sector, which shed another 17,300 in August. The biggest gains were in the retail and wholesale trade, up 21,200, and finance and real estate, up 17,500. Six provinces saw employment rise, with the biggest increases in Ontario, British Columbia and Quebec. Alberta lost the most jobs in August. "Since employment peaked in October 2008, total employment has fallen by 387,000 (down 2.3 per cent)," the agency said. "The trend in employment, however, has changed recently. Over the last five months, employment has fallen by 31,000, a much smaller decline than the 357,000 observed during the five months following October 2008." Most economists had expected the economy to lose jobs in August, with the consensus being about 15,000 fewer positions. They also expected the unemployment rate to rise to 8.8 per cent. "This report may not quite carry the good housekeeping seal of approval for the recovery, but it certainly is another big step in the right direction," said Douglas Porter, deputy chief economist at BMO Capital Markets. "While we can quibble about the details, the broader picture here is that the labour market is stabilizing, and apparently much faster than in the U.S." (The U.S. Labor Department said Friday that 216,000 jobs were lost in August, although that was less than analysts had expected.) Charmaine Buskas, senior economics strategist at TD Securities, said "the fact that the (Canadian) unemployment rate continues to rise has a bit of a mixed messages, as the initial interpretation is negative, but suggests that workers are slowly becoming more encouraged by better prospects in the job market." "Ultimately, this report, while positive, is not going to have much impact on the Bank of Canada. It has already committed to keep rates on hold, and one month of good employment numbers is unlikely to sway the decision." Avery Shenfeld, chief economist at CIBC World Markets, said: "Half a loaf, or in this case, half a job, is better than none, so an increase in Canadian employment driven by part-time work is still an encouraging signpost of an economic recovery now underway." The employment report follows some mixed signals of an economic recovery in Canada. On Thursday, the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development said Canada's economy will contract two per cent in the third quarter of 2009 before edging up 0.4 per cent in the final three months of the year. That's in contrast to forecasts by the Bank of Canada, which expects the country's gross domestic product to grow 1.3 per cent in the third quarter of this year, followed by a three per cent gain in the final three months of 2009. The central bank also forecast the economy will contract 2.3 per cent overall this year and grow three per cent in 2010. Last week, Statistics Canada reported GDP increased 0.1 per cent in June, even as the second quarter declined overall by 3.4 per cent. The outlook by OECD, a Paris-based group of 30 industrialized nations, shows Canada's recovery lagging along with the U.K., which is expected to decline one per cent in the third quarter and be flat in the final quarter, and Italy, which is forecast to shrink 1.1 per cent and grow 0.4 per cent, respectively. August unemployment rates by province: Newfoundland and Labrador 15.6% Prince Edward Island 13.7% Nova Scotia 9.5% New Brunswick 9.3% Quebec 9.1% Ontario 9.4% Manitoba 5.7% Saskatchewan 5.0%. Alberta 7.4% British Columbia 7.8% Source: Statistics Canada © Copyright © Canwest News Service
  5. Story God bless Quebec for making life so hard for foreign trained doctors to practice here, even after passing exams here in Canada / Quebec. Honestly if they got rid of the damn language law, Montreal and the rest of the province would grow in more ways than one. Down with Bill 101.
  6. the title says it all. These airlines are getting new long-haul airplanes and looking at new possibilities to grow in North America. Rumours have pointed that each of these airlines have some kind of interest (or had) interest in Montreal. With the IAG investment. Aer Lingus is looking at North Atlantic expansion. Los Angeles, Dallas, Miami, Montreal would be the largest destinations with no service. Let's see how much these materialize vs. other cities in the US/Canada. Then we will really know how Montreal compares internationally.
  7. North America’s High-Tech Economy - Milken Institute Ranking North America’s High-Tech Economy: The Geography of Knowledge-Based Industries ranks the top high-tech centers in the U.S., Canada and Mexico in their ability to grow and sustain thriving high-tech industries. The top 25 markets are listed on the left, showing the 2007 and 2003 rankings. An interactive map of the metros is directly below and scroll down for a full listing of all 393 high-tech centers ranked. Data is also available for each of the 19 specific high-tech industries. Click here for industry specific data. The full report and executive summary of North America's High-Tech Economy: The Geography of Knowledge-Based Industries is available for free download after registration. Top 25 High Tech Metropolitan Areas 2007 2003 Metropolitan Area 1 1 San Jose-Sunnyvale, CA (MSA) 2 3 Seattle-Bellevue-Everett, WA (MD) 3 2 Cambridge-Newton, MA (MD) 4 5 Washington-Arlington, DC-VA-MD 5 4 Los Angeles-Long Beach-Glendale, CA 6 6 Dallas-Plano-Irving, TX (MD) 7 7 San Diego-Carlsbad, CA (MSA) 8 11 Santa Ana-Anaheim-Irvine, CA (MD) 9 9 New York-White Plains-Wayne, NY-NJ 10 8 San Francisco-San Mateo, CA (MD) 11 13 Philadelphia, PA (MD) 12 12 Atlanta-Sandy Springs, GA (MSA) 13 10 Edison, NJ (MD) 14 14 Chicago-Naperville-Joliet, IL (MD) 15 25 TORONTO 16 15 Oakland-Fremont-Hayward, CA (MD) 17 18 Minneapolis-St. Paul, MN-WI (MSA) 18 17 Denver-Aurora, CO (MSA) 19 27 MONTREAL 20 16 Austin-Round Rock, TX (MSA) 21 21 Houston-Sugar Land-Baytown, TX (MSA) 22 29 Huntsville, AL (MSA) 23 20 Phoenix-Mesa-Scottsdale, AZ (MSA) 24 31 Wichita, KS (MSA) 25 23 Bethesda-Gaithersburg, MD (MD) http://www.milkeninstitute.org/nahightech/nahightech.taf