Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'fairview'.

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Real estate projects
    • Proposals
    • Going up
    • Completed
    • Mass Transit
    • Infrastructures
    • Cultural, entertainment and sport projects
    • Cancelled projects
  • General topics
    • City planning and architecture
    • Urban photography
    • Urban tech
    • General discussions
    • Entertainment, food and culture
    • Current events
    • Off Topic
  • MTLYUL Aviation
    • General discussion
    • Spotting at YUL
  • Here and abroad
    • Quebec City and the rest of the province of Québec.
    • Toronto and the rest of Canada
    • USA
    • Europe
    • Projects elsewhere in the world

Calendars

There are no results to display.

There are no results to display.

Blogs


Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


About Me


Biography


Location


Interests


Occupation


Type of dwelling

Found 8 results

  1. 26/10/2007 Le nom des lauréats est tiré de la liste des 10 propriétés imposables non résidentielles les plus évaluées dressée par la Ville de Montréal lors des derniers rôles triennaux déposés en septembre 2006. Au sommet du palmarès, la Place Ville-Marie arrive loin devant avec une valeur de 616 M$. Viennent ensuite, dans l’ordre, le complexe Desjardins (470M$), le centre Fairview à Pointe-Claire (315M$), I.B.M. Marathon (283M$), les Galeries d’Anjou (259M$), le 1000 de la gauchetière (250M$), le marché Central (247M$), le Centre Bell (227M$), le centre Eaton (210M$) et, enfin, l’édifice Bell (171M$). Il est aussi intéressant de jeter un oeil sur le prix de certains édifices non imposables. Ainsi, les Québécois, et notamment les fumeurs, seront ravis de savoir que le stade olympique est évalué à 175 M$. Au final, rappelons, que le stade a coûté la bagatelle somme de 1,5G$ et que les Québécois ont du mettre la main au portefeuille pendant 30 ans pour en devenir propriétaire. Du côté, des édifices religieux, l’Oratoire Saint-Joseph, qui surplombe la rue Queen-Mary, est estimé à 42,2 M$. Pour sa part, la basilique Notre-Dame, située au coeur du vieux-Montréal, est évaluée à 8,2 M$. Contestations possibles Ces évaluations ne constituent pas une science exacte et peuvent être contestées comme l’illustre la bataille judiciaire que s’apprête à livrer George Gillett et le Canadien de Montréal contre l'oeil de l'évaluateur municipal. Le propriétaire du Centre Bell pense que l’édifice vaut 75 M$ et non 225 M$ comme l’affirme la Ville. La cause sera présentée devant le Tribunal administratif du Québec (TAQ) le 12 novembre prochain. Les avocats de Gillett entendent contester le rôle d'évaluation 2004-2006 et le nouveau rôle 2007-2010 et ainsi faire l’économie d’une partie des taxes afférentes à l’édifice. Suite au dépôt du dernier rôle en septembre 2006, il était possible de demander une révision administrative jusqu’en avril 2007. Sur 400 000 évaluations, la Ville a reçu 5 000 demandes. « Si notre réponse écrite ne convainc pas les propriétaires, ces derniers peuvent alors intenter un recours devant le TAQ mais cela représente moins de 10 % des cas. Historiquement 1 demandeur sur 2 obtiendra gain de cause devant le tribunal », souligne le service d’évaluation. La majorité des demandes concernent une révison à la baisse de l’évaluation des propriétés. C’est sur cette évaluation que sera déterminé la taxe foncière. Et dans le cas de notre liste des 10 propriétés imposables non résidentielles, la facture peut-être salée. Voici les montants exigés pour 2007dans l’ordre : la place Ville-Marie (22 282 071$), la place Desjardins (16 986 892,98 $), Fairview Pointe-Claire (5 733 034,65 $), I.B.M. Marathon (10 496 598 $), les galeries d’Anjou (9 431 944,51 $), 1000 de la gauchetière (8 648 033 $), le Marché Central (7 202 357 $), le centre Bell (6 959 925 $), le centre Eaton (6 834 491,69 $) et l’édifice Bell (877 989,76 $).
  2. Canadian Investor Bets on a Montreal Revival Cadillac Fairview Wants to Expand City's Business Center to the South By DAVID GEORGE-COSH Nov. 5, 2013 6:11 p.m. ET For more than two decades, Montreal was one of the sleepiest office markets in Canada, seeing no new private development as cities such as Toronto and energy-rich Calgary added millions of square feet of new space. Now, as Canadian investors step up real-estate investment throughout the world, a company owned by one of Canada's largest pension funds is looking to shake things up. Cadillac Fairview Corp., a unit of Ontario Teachers' Pension Plan, wants to expand the city's business center to the south with a planned 1.9 billion Canadian dollars ($1.82 billion) development next to the Bell Centre, where the National Hockey League's Montreal Canadiens play. The company earlier this year broke ground on the first building on the 9.2 acre site, named the Deloitte Tower after the professional-services firm that it lured from Montreal's traditional downtown. Owners of office buildings in Montreal's core dismiss the competitive threat, citing the lack of retail and transportation in the Deloitte Tower area. "I don't think that people who went to that location will be happy," says Bill Tresham, president of global investments at Ivanhoé Cambridge Inc., which owns the Place Ville Marie office complex that Deloitte is vacating. But Cadillac Fairview executives say businesses will be attracted to the tower's modern workspaces, energy efficiency and the civic square and skating rink in the complex modeled on New York's Rockefeller Center. "That's where we feel the growth is," says Sal Iacono, Cadillac's senior vice president for development in Eastern Canada. Developers in other cities have had mixed results when they have tried to build new business districts to compete with traditional downtowns. London's Canary Wharf development was forced to seek bankruptcy protection in its early years, although it eventually turned into a success. The Fan Pier project in Boston finally has gained traction after years of delay. The Cadillac Fairview development is partly a sign that Montreal has absorbed a glut of space that has hung over its office market for years. Its third-quarter vacancy rate for top-quality space downtown was 5.4%, compared with 9.4% in the third quarter of 2010, according to Cushman & Wakefield Inc. But the project also is a sign of the increasing appetite that Canadian investors have for real-estate risk as the world slowly recovers from the downturn. Canadian investors are on track to purchase at least US$15.6 billion of commercial real estate world-wide in 2013, up from US$14.5 billion in 2012, and a postcrash record, according to Real Capital Analytics Much of the interest is coming from Canadian pension funds, which have more of an appetite for risk than U.S. and European institutions because Canadian property wasn't hurt as badly by the downturn, experts say. The Canada Pension Plan Investment Board, the country's largest pension fund, allocated 11.1% of its assets to real estate, for a total of C$20.9 billion, in the first quarter of fiscal 2014. That is up from 10.7% in the first quarter of fiscal 2013, for a total of C$17.7 billion. Ontario Teachers' Pension Plan has been aggressive in several other sectors as it tries to shore up its funding deficit amid stubbornly low interest rates. The fund last month acquired Busy Bees Nursery Group, the largest child-care provider in the United Kingdom, for an undisclosed sum, while contributing US$500 million to Hudson's Bay Co.'s purchase of Saks Fifth Avenue for US$2.9 billion in July. Over the past year, Teachers' also has made investments in Australian telecom companies, oil assets in Saskatchewan and a supplier of outdoor sports-storage systems. Cadillac Fairview's real-estate portfolio increased to C$16.9 billion at the end of 2012, the last period for which data is available, up from C$15 billion in 2011. Montreal has a population of 1.65 million and its business sector, which relies heavily on aerospace, information technology, pharmaceuticals and tourism, remained relatively healthy during the downturn. The last commercial office buildings in its modern office district were completed by private developers in 1992. Nearly 20% of the city's office inventory was built before 1960, more than in other large Canadian cities, according to Cushman & Wakefield. Other pension funds also are making new investments in Montreal's office market, though they are focusing on core properties. Ivanhoé Cambridge, an arm of Quebec-based pension fund Caisse de dépot et placement du Québec, spent more than C$400 million in August to acquire full control of the Place Ville Marie office complex, and is planning a C$100 million upgrade. Cadillac Fairview began assembling land for its project in 2009 when it acquired Windsor Station, a historic hub that dates to the 19th century. The area is southwest of Old Montreal, the historic section of the city near the St. Lawrence River. But the area has been unappealing to most office-building developers because it lacks many stores, restaurants or other amenities. "No one was interested in developing," Mr. Iacono says. The company has been planning a development including retail, office and residential space since then, but many were skeptical that businesses could be convinced to move outside of the city's traditional business center. That skepticism was damped when Deloitte announced plans to move. Then this year, the Alcan unit of mining giant Rio Tinto said it would move its headquarters to the top eight floors of the 500,000 square-foot tower, increasing its occupancy to 70%. Cadillac Fairview also has started building a 555-unit condo on the site. Eventually, the entire complex will include an additional 4 million square feet of office, retail and residential space as well as public areas. Deloitte executives say the new building—slated to open in 2015—was appealing because of its energy efficiency and green features such as stalls for charging electric cars. "This building is a catalyst for a whole energy for that part of the city," says Sheila Botting, national leader of real estate for Deloitte in Canada.
  3. Une deuxième «Tour des Canadiens» en vente dès l'automne Hugo Joncas . les affaires.com Sa Tour des Canadiens est vendue à 100%, et Cadillac Fairview veut mettre en marché un deuxième immeuble de condos d’envergure comparable dès cet automne, au sud du Centre Bell. La seconde tour de copropriétés « sera en grande partie semblable » à la Tour des Canadiens, dit Wayne Barwise, vice-président directeur, Aménagement, chez Cadillac Fairview. « Elle est toujours sur la table à dessin » a-t-il ajouté, en marge de la cérémonie de la première pelletée de terre de la Tour Deloitte, un autre projet de la filiale immobilière du Régime de retraite des enseignants de l’Ontario dans le quadrilatère. «Le site précis n'est pas encore choisi, mais l'immeuble sera situé sur nos terrains au sud du Centre Belle, rue Saint-Antoine, dit Sal Iacono, vice-président principal, Développement et gestion immobilière, Est du Canada, chez Cadillac Fairview. Les dimensions précises de la nouvelle tour restent également à préciser. «On est en train d’étudier ça présentement. On va faire quelque chose à l’échelle de ce que le marché nous permettra de faire.» Sal Iacono précise que le nouveau gratte-ciel pourrait être aussi grand que la Tour des Canadiens, qui compte 50 étages et 552 unités, et qu’il aura lui aussi un accès direct au métro. «Selon nous, non, le marché ne ralentira pas pour ce type de projet», dit-il. Cadillac Fairview et son partenaire constructeur Canderel mise sur des unités de luxe et mousse leur vente avec un marketing intense. La Tour des Canadiens, par exemple, a développé tout un plan d’avantages en collaboration avec les Canadiens de Montréal pour mousser la vente de ses copropriétés, comme du temps de glace au Centre Bell, un accès à des billets en prévente et des tirages pour des places en loge ou directement derrière le banc des joueurs. Chez Altus, l’évaluateur Mathieu Collette croit que les projets avec des vues dégagées, avec un accès direct au métro, comme la Tour des Canadiens, continueront de bien se vendre. «Au dernier trimestre de 2012, 64 % des unités en projet au centre-ville, dans le Vieux-Montréal et dans Griffintown étaient déjà vendues », signale-t-il. Deux tours de 500 000 pieds carrés À l’est du Centre Bell, Cadillac Fairview a déjà excavé l’équivalent des trois étages de stationnement que comptera son autre projet en cours, la Tour Deloitte, un gratte-ciel de bureaux de 26 étages et 495 000 pieds carrés, dont le cabinet de comptables sera locataire principal. Le promoteur a en outre donné peu de détails supplémentaires sur la deuxième tour de bureaux qu’il compte construire en face, de l’autre côté de la rue Saint-Antoine. Elle fera quelque 500 000 pieds carrés également, mais sera « différente » de la Tour Deloitte, dit Sal Iacono, qui n’a pas voulu donner plus de détails. Selon nos sources, les courtiers immobiliers reçoivent déjà des appels de Cadillac Fairview pour sonder l’intérêt de gros locataires potentiels pour son deuxième immeuble de bureaux. « La raison d’être d’un promoteur, c’est toujours de vendre le prochain projet », dit Sal Iacono. http://www.lesaffaires.com/secteurs-d-activite/immobilier/une-deuxieme-tour-des-canadiens-en-vente-des-l-automne/555934#.UawFOPa1Y5s
  4. THE CANADIAN PRESS MONTREAL–Cadillac Fairview has announced a $52-million investment to "bring elegance and luxury to the shopping experience" at Carrefour Laval in suburban Montreal. The renovation, starting immediately and set for completion by the autumn of next year, includes relocating the shopping centre's food courts into a new 1,200-seat complex, adding more stores and ``harmonizing the common areas with the garden court." Cadillac Fairview, owned by the Ontario Teachers' Pension Plan, said Wednesday the design is "inspired by the urban trend seen in shopping centres of leading international cities." The upgrading of the 34-year-old mall, now with about 300 retailers in its 1.3 million leasable square feet, will include new flooring, ceilings, lighting and soft seating areas, with construction planned to minimize inconvenience for shoppers. Other properties in Cadillac Fairview's $16-billion portfolio include the Toronto-Dominion Centre and Eaton Centre in Toronto and the Pacific Centre in Vancouver
  5. Une deuxième «Tour des Canadiens» en vente dès l'automne Hugo Joncas . les affaires.com Sa Tour des Canadiens est vendue à 100%, et Cadillac Fairview veut mettre en marché un deuxième immeuble de condos d’envergure comparable dès cet automne, au sud du Centre Bell. La seconde tour de copropriétés « sera en grande partie semblable » à la Tour des Canadiens, dit Wayne Barwise, vice-président directeur, Aménagement, chez Cadillac Fairview. « Elle est toujours sur la table à dessin » a-t-il ajouté, en marge de la cérémonie de la première pelletée de terre de la Tour Deloitte, un autre projet de la filiale immobilière du Régime de retraite des enseignants de l’Ontario dans le quadrilatère. «Le site précis n'est pas encore choisi, mais l'immeuble sera situé sur nos terrains au sud du Centre Belle, rue Saint-Antoine, dit Sal Iacono, vice-président principal, Développement et gestion immobilière, Est du Canada, chez Cadillac Fairview. Les dimensions précises de la nouvelle tour restent également à préciser. «On est en train d’étudier ça présentement. On va faire quelque chose à l’échelle de ce que le marché nous permettra de faire.» Sal Iacono précise que le nouveau gratte-ciel pourrait être aussi grand que la Tour des Canadiens, qui compte 50 étages et 552 unités, et qu’il aura lui aussi un accès direct au métro. «Selon nous, non, le marché ne ralentira pas pour ce type de projet», dit-il. Cadillac Fairview et son partenaire constructeur Canderel mise sur des unités de luxe et mousse leur vente avec un marketing intense. La Tour des Canadiens, par exemple, a développé tout un plan d’avantages en collaboration avec les Canadiens de Montréal pour mousser la vente de ses copropriétés, comme du temps de glace au Centre Bell, un accès à des billets en prévente et des tirages pour des places en loge ou directement derrière le banc des joueurs. Chez Altus, l’évaluateur Mathieu Collette croit que les projets avec des vues dégagées, avec un accès direct au métro, comme la Tour des Canadiens, continueront de bien se vendre. «Au dernier trimestre de 2012, 64 % des unités en projet au centre-ville, dans le Vieux-Montréal et dans Griffintown étaient déjà vendues », signale-t-il. Deux tours de 500 000 pieds carrés À l’est du Centre Bell, Cadillac Fairview a déjà excavé l’équivalent des trois étages de stationnement que comptera son autre projet en cours, la Tour Deloitte, un gratte-ciel de bureaux de 26 étages et 495 000 pieds carrés, dont le cabinet de comptables sera locataire principal. Le promoteur a en outre donné peu de détails supplémentaires sur la deuxième tour de bureaux qu’il compte construire en face, de l’autre côté de la rue Saint-Antoine. Elle fera quelque 500 000 pieds carrés également, mais sera « différente » de la Tour Deloitte, dit Sal Iacono, qui n’a pas voulu donner plus de détails. Selon nos sources, les courtiers immobiliers reçoivent déjà des appels de Cadillac Fairview pour sonder l’intérêt de gros locataires potentiels pour son deuxième immeuble de bureaux. « La raison d’être d’un promoteur, c’est toujours de vendre le prochain projet », dit Sal Iacono. http://www.lesaffaires.com/secteurs-d-activite/immobilier/une-deuxieme-tour-des-canadiens-en-vente-des-l-automne/555934#.UawFOPa1Y5s
  6. Nouvel immeuble de bureaux de classe A (105 000pi2) qui ouvrira ses portes au printemps 2011 à l'intersection de l'autoroute 40 et du boul. St-Jean (de biais au fairview Pointe-Claire, de l'autre-côté de l'autoroute). http://www.dcysa.ca/4-bureaux-offices/5667-6500-Autoroute-Transcanadienne/ Je n'ai malheureusement pas de photo mais ça creuse depuis quelques semaines. Une belle addition au secteur.
  7. The Holiday Inn in Pointe-Claire near Fairview seems to be getting a facelift. When I drive by it tonight or tomorrow, I will try and take a picture of it.
  8. La société Cadillac Fairview a annoncé mercredi un investissement afin de revitaliser et d'actualiser le Carrefour Laval, un important centre commercial de la banlieue nord de Montréal. Pour en lire plus...
×
×
  • Create New...
adblock_message_value
adblock_accept_btn_value