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Found 18 results

  1. A friend of mine confirmed the other day that Peugeot is currently carrying out a feasibility study, with the help of Broccolini, for a new warehouse/plant in Vaudreuil. The facility may also include a test track. As of right now this is all very preliminary, but definitely something to follow closely! If anyone else has any information, please share it! (See picture for proposed location)*
  2. The fine Montreal art of being happy with what you have ARTHUR KAPTAINIS, The Gazette Published: Saturday, August 18 Almost everything was wonderful last Saturday - the weather, the music, the charity, the skyline. The sound? Well, what do you want? Percival Molson Stadium was built for football, not for music. There might be room for sonic improvement next summer, if I may jump to the reasonable conclusion that a concert by the Montreal Symphony Orchestra under the auspices of the Montreal Alouettes, with or without Kent Nagano, is now an annual event. One point of departure would be a shell that projects sound rather than a tent that contains it. Of course, there are certain sonic variables beyond the control of the MSO or the Als. The Royal Victoria Hospital is nearby, with its mamoth ventilation units. A two-hour shutdown of hospital air conditioning would be very nice, but perhaps too much to ask. Imperfect Acoustics: Kent Nagano and the Montreal Symphony Orchestra in last weekend's charity concert in Molson Stadium. While I mused over the problems and possible solutions it occurred to me that Montreal does not have a good, permanent outdoor summer concert facility. It is an odd situation considering that the city appears to experience more outdoor summer concerts than any other city on Earth. Where to install it? There is a mountain and a Chalet, the esplanade of which is haunted by ghosts as formidable as Leonard Bernstein, who conducted the MSO there in 1944 and 1945. In the 1950s Alexander Brott developed a rival operation called Dominion Concerts under the Stars. To build an amphitheatre anywhere on the mountain, however, would likely involve the felling of trees, an idea that now creates fierce opposition regardless of the benefit. Furthermore, the Montreal International Jazz Festival and Les Francofolies are strongly integrated into the centre of the city and Place des Arts. There are idle lots in that neighbourhood, some formerly earmarked for the development of a Place du Festival. But as the destruction of the Spectrum suggests, few downtown developers view the performing arts as a priority. And even a radical arts freak would have to concede the essential oddness of a deep-downtown outdoor concert venue that is vacant nine months a year. To build something as fine as the Lanaudière Amphitheatre within the city limits would also have the regrettable effect of siphoning off thousands of listeners from Lanaudière itself. Perhaps the solution to this problem, among others, is not to worry about it. Russell Johnson, the American acoustician who died last week, was an international figure famed for his concert halls in Birmingham, Lucerne and Dallas. But his Artec Consultants firm had a disproportionate influence in Canada. The Domaine Forget in Charlevoix - frequently used as a recording facility - is an Artec design, as is Jack Singer Concert Hall in Calgary, the Chan Cultural Centre on the campus of the University of British Columbia, the Thunder Bay Community Auditorium, the Weston Recital Hall in Toronto, the hall of the Festival of the Sound in Ontario cottage country and the Bayreuth copy that is the Raffi Armenian Theatre of the Centre in the Square in Kitchener. The Francis Winspear Centre in Edmonton is thought by many to be the best of all modern Canadian concert spaces. But perhaps Johnson's most astounding contribution to the cause of good acoustics in Canada was his transformation of the notorious dead space of Roy Thomson Hall in Toronto into a vibrant home for the long-suffering Toronto Symphony Orchestra. "That was easy," I remember his telling me at the 2002 reopening, with a shrug. The essense of the solution was reducing the interior volume with bulkheads. Sure it was easy - for someone with Johnsons's mix of spatial instinct, musical perception and pure science. Johnson long harboured a desire to build a new hall for the MSO. It appears he will realize it posthumously. The Quebec government chose Artec as the acoustical consultant for the project even before launching the competition to seek an architect. Diamond Schmitt Architects, one of the firms in the running for the MSO hall design, has won a "Good Design is Good Business" citation from BusinessWeek and Architectural Record magazines for the Four Seasons Centre in Toronto, a facility often referred to simply as the opera house. It was one of 10 projects cited from a competitive pool of 96 projects from nine countries. This common-sense award honours "architects and clients who best utilize design to achieve strategic objectives," according to Helen Walters, editor of innovation and design for BusinessWeek.com. My sense is that it serves as a counterweight to the ultraflamboyant designs that tend to capture headlines. The CAMMAC music centre in the Laurentians has also received an honourable mention from the Prix de l'Ordre des architectes du Québec 2007 for its new music pavillion. There will be a celebration at the site on Sept. 5. Love it or not, Place des Arts is active during the summer. Carnegie Hall - despite its prestige and air-conditioned presence at Seventh Ave. and 57th St. - is completely dark through the summer of 2007 and much of September. By October, however, the place is humming. The MSO used to occupy an October weekend under Charles Dutoit. During the coming season the orchestra will give one performance in the New York temple, on Saturday, March 8. Nagano conducts a program of Debussy (Le Martyre de Saint Sébastien: Symphonic Fragments), Tchaikovsky (Violin Concerto), Unsuk Chin (a new work) and Scriabin (The Poem of Ecstasy). All these selections are in keeping with the orchestra's former Franco-Russian reputation. If you wait six days you can then hear the Philadelphia Orchestra under its chief conductor - Charles Dutoit - in an even more MSO-ish program of Bartok (The Miraculous Mandarin Suite), Debussy (Nocturnes) and Holst (The Planets).
  3. (Courtesy of Wings Magazine) --- (Courtesy of Auto123) Both articles are pretty old, but they are still interesting too say the least. For the ICAR, thats pretty awesome to see they actually were able to get part of the mirabel airport Now people from Montreal do not have too really go to Tremblant for a track meet day
  4. DRAXIS To Construct Second Facility In Montreal Area November 27, 2007: 10:14 AM EST DOW JONES NEWSWIRES DRAXIS Health Inc. (DRAX) has initiated construction of a 77,000-square-foot secondary packaging and warehousing facility in the Montreal area to help it meet its obligations under its contract to produce a broad portfolio of multiple non-sterile specialty semi-solid products for Johnson & Johnson (JNJ). DRAXIS said it expects the new facility to be completed by mid-2008. The new facility is being built by Montreal developer Broccolini Construction Inc. specifically to meet the needs of DRAXIS with respect to this major contract. It will be owned by Broccolini Group of Cos. and leased to DRAXIS under a seven-year agreement with options to renew. Initially, DRAXIS plans to have about 50 employees at this second Montreal- area facility, part of the 80 to 100 employees that it will hire for this contract. The contract to produce semi-solid specialty products calls for commercial production to start in 2009 and initially run for five years to the end of 2013. DRAXIS, Mississauga, Ont., is a pharmaceutical company. -Carolyn King; 416-306-2100; [email protected]
  5. Honeywell to shut Montreal plant, shift jobs to P.E.I. and U.S. THE CANADIAN PRESS Published Thursday February 28th, 2008 MONTREAL - Honeywell International is closing its 81-year-old Montreal repair and overhaul facility that employs 200 people as it shifts work to Prince Edward Island and the United States. The facility is being shut over the next six months because of a reduced demand for auxiliary power units on older model planes and the U.S. Air Force's decision to complete the work in house, Honeywell spokesman Bill Reavis said Thursday. Honeywell's decision follows the company's efforts to manage its costs in a competitive global aerospace industry, he said. Employees, including the 130 union workers, will have an opportunity to apply for other positions in Honeywell after the work is moved to Summerside, P.E.I. and several facilities in the U.S. More than 100 people work at Honeywell's P.E.I. facility.
  6. CN sells Montreal station for $355-million Reuters September 19, 2007 at 5:26 PM EDT VANCOUVER — — Canadian National Railway Co. [CNR-T]agreed Wednesday to sell its Central Station complex in Montreal to Homburg Invest Inc., [HII.A-T]but will keep its headquarters in the facility. CN Rail said it expects to get $355-million for the downtown Montreal property, and will lease back the 17-storey office building that houses its headquarters. The sale and long-term lease deal will also allow the station's passenger facility to continue being used by commuter trains, Via Rail Canada and Amtrak, Canadian National said. Canadian Pacific Railway Ltd. announced last month that it also wants to sell its Windsor Station in Montreal as part of a plan to monetize the value of its real estate assets.
  7. Telus announces $33 million "Green" Internet data centre Wednesday, 08 October 2008 Telus announces $33 million "Green" Internet data centreTelus today announced that it would be investing over $33 million to build a more energy efficient Internet data centre to be located in Laval, Quebec. The company says the state-of-the-art facility will be designed according to the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) standards. An Internet data centre is a highly secure building that houses extremely powerful computer servers; all of which have redundant power, cooling and security systems. Recent estimates suggest that data centres now consume about 1 to 1.5% of all energy produced in North America and its share is growing therefore, longer term, greener data centres could make a significant dent in overall energy consumption. Telus, which currently operates eight data centres across Canada, says its newest Internet data centre will be a 44,500 square foot facility that will be connected to six mega-volt-amps of power, equivalent to the needs of more than 5,000 homes! In addition to the power required to power individual computer servers, data centers require a vast amount energy to counter the heat generated by the computer servers. The new data center features a high density power design and efficient heat exchange system will turn Quebec's cold climate into "free cooling" during two thirds of the year. Large, highly efficient air conditioning units will be used when "free cooling" is unavailable. The company says its newest, greenest Internet data centre will become operational in 2010.
  8. GE Hydro to close Montreal plant in 2008, affecting 450 workers 1 hour ago MONTREAL - The GE Hydro plant in the Montreal suburb of Lachine will close next June, eliminating 450 jobs. The subsidiary of American giant General Electric has made more than half of the Hydro-Quebec turbines installed at the James Bay dams. The plant's activities will end with the completion of these contracts, employees were told. The company said it is restructuring its activities, adding that its hydroelectric division has been losing money. The laid-off workers are mostly welders, machinists and warehouse workers. The closure of the 89-year-old facility is another blow to Montreal's manufacturing sector, which has been struck hard by the appreciation of the Canadian dollar and growing competition from emerging countries, particularly China. At its peak production in the 1970s, GE Hydro employed more than 3,500 workers
  9. Plan for 'private casino' in Snowdon faces stiff fight By Andy Riga, The GazetteJanuary 30, 2009Comments (3) A brand new private betting parlour on Décarie Blvd. in Snowdon? Don’t bet on it just yet. Community groups, the city of Montreal and an anti-gambling coalition say they will oppose a proposal to create the venue – to feature 300 video-lottery terminals as well as betting on televised horse races – near the current site of the Hippodrome de Montréal. Opponents fear such a facility would exacerbate social problems associated with VLTs, which are highly addictive. They say a casino has no place on or near the site. The city expects the provincially owned land – a sprawling piece of prime real estate on the métro network and near the Décarie Expressway and Highway 40 – to be used for housing. Currently, the Hippodrome (formerly known as Blue Bonnets) houses 200 VLTs and offers off-track betting. Under a restructuring plan to be presented in Quebec Superior Court on Monday, racetrack operator Attractions Hippiques wants to permanently remove horse racing from the site. The company, which is in creditor protection, would then build a new gambling venue offering 300 VLTs and off-track betting. It would be built “near the current Hippodrome,” according to the restructuring plan. It is unclear who would pay the bill but Alain Vallières, head of a horse breeders’ group known by the acronym SPECSQ, said his sources say the new facility would cost about $17 million. His group opposes the proposal because it does not include plans for a replacement racetrack in the Montreal area. Attractions Hippiques’ plan for a “private casino” on the Hippodrome site is unacceptable, especially since Côte des Neiges is in desperate need of housing, said Denyse Lacelle, co-ordinator of the Côte des Neiges Community Council, a coalition of 45 local groups. The site should be used for new residential development, including affordable housing, with an adjacent industrial sector expanded onto the site to help create jobs, she said. “With its location minutes from downtown and its massive size – the size of all of Old Montreal – it should be used for housing, not for VLTs,” she said. “If people want another casino in addition to the Casino de Montréal, the farther from residential areas the better.” She said Côte des Neiges, where 40 per cent of residents live in poverty, is no place for a casino. It could cause more financial misery, she explained. The community council, which plans to picket Monday’s court hearing, will press politicians to stop the proposal. The Quebec government, which owns the land on which the Hippodrome is located, would have to okay the company’s plan. Marvin Rotrand, city councillor for the area, said the city has not been consulted on the issue and would “ferociously oppose” plans for gambling on – or near – the Hippodrome site. “Whether it’s 300 poker machines or 2,000, we don’t want any casino” and the social problems it would cause, he said. As for the Hippodrome, “we want it redeveloped mostly for housing. It’s a hedge against urban sprawl – a way to let young families stay in the city.” Between 5,000 and 7,000 units could be built there, he said. Last year, a Quebec public health department study concluded that one out of four people who gamble on both VLTs and horse racing risk developing a serious addiction. Gambling critics describe VLTs as the crack cocaine of gambling, saying they lead to financial ruin for some addicts and suicide for others. Alain Dubois, a spokesperson for Emjeu, a citizens coalition for responsible gambling, said he fears a new facility at the Hippodrome would feature new types of VLTs that are aimed at a new audience: young people. The new VLTs are more interactive and challenging but are just as addictive, Dubois said. “No matter what type of VLT is installed, it’s a worrying proposal,” he said. “Adding machines there in a new building that has the allure of a casino in such a central location could attract many new players,” and leave more Quebecers addicted. [email protected] © Copyright © The Montreal Gazette
  10. Read more: http://montreal.ctvnews.ca/disturbing-video-of-er-doctor-arrested-by-sq-while-working-1.1012910#ixzz2AT5149cw In all honest. Why is my tax dollars paying for these guys to "protect and serve". I want them fired or give me my money back. We the people of Quebec are the shareholders. The politicians and the people they hire, should be accountable to us and if we want someones head, we should get it.
  11. Cirque du Soleil’s Amaluna is performed in Old Montreal on Tuesday, April 24, 2012. Photograph by: Dario Ayala , Montreal Gazette MONTREAL - Quel horreur! It’s possible that the Cirque du Soleil may find its first permanent Canadian performance venue in Toronto rather than Montreal. According to stories published recently in the Toronto Star and the Las Vegas Review-Journal, MGM Resorts International, which is lobbying to get in on a proposed downtown Toronto casino, is hinting that it might include a permanent venue for Montreal’s Cirque du Soleil. This would be a huge blow to Quebec pride. Unless, of course, Cirque owner and adventurous billionaire Guy Laliberté appeases les gens de notre pays by completing a permanent venue for his billion circus here first — something he has been talking about doing for decades. The most recent Montreal rumours have to do with the Cirque’s acquisition of the Maison Alcan building on Sherbrooke St. Paul Godfrey, chair of the Ontario Lottery and Gaming Corporation as well as president and CEO of PostMedia (the company that owns the Gazette), says there is indeed substance to the rumour: “From what I understand,” he said Tuesday in an email response, “if MGM is chosen as the successful gaming operator, their facility would include a permanent Cirque facility. This is all subject to the city approving a casino in Toronto. I do know that from both MGM and Cirque.” Cirque du Soleil public relations director Renée Claude Ménard, too, confirmed the story Tuesday. “If MGM obtains something in Toronto,” she said, “we have confirmed that we would be their entertainment content provider. What it will be will be determined at a later date, but yes, we have of course confirmed our interest to our partner MGM.” When Alan Feldman, MGM Resorts senior vice-president of public affairs, visited Toronto last month to plead his case, he talked of a $4-billion resort that would include a 1,000-room hotel and create 8,000 jobs. The Las Vegas-based MGM is but one of several companies lobbying to run the proposed Toronto casino, which probably would be located at Exhibition Place, although other Toronto locations are being considered. Caesars Entertainment Corp., the company that runs Caesars Palace, the performing home of Céline Dion in Vegas, also wants in on the Toronto game. (There are, as yet, however, no rumours of a Caesar’s that would entice Dion to take up permanent residence in Toronto.) Godfrey has requested that the City of Toronto come to a decision on this matter by February 2013, hinting that the planned casino might find a better welcome outside the GTA area. Many Torontonians are opposed to the idea of a casino. Meanwhile, the James Cameron film Cirque du Soleil: Worlds Away just had its debut at the Tokyo International Film Festival last weekend. And here in Montreal, it has been announced that Cirque CEO Daniel Lamarre will be awarded an honorary degree by McGill University. [email protected] © Copyright © The Montreal Gazette Read more: http://www.montrealgazette.com/life/Cirque+Soleil+might+permanent+Toronto+venue/7435689/story.html#ixzz2AE1Lxm7j
  12. Thales opens expanded facility in Montreal By Mary Kirby Thales has unveiled an expanded facility in Montreal to meet the continuing growth of its aerospace capabilities. The manufacturer’s new larger location will house around 145 employees, including after-sales support and a maintenance team, as well as test bench facilities. Today’s inauguration coincides with the 10-year anniversary of Thales’ aerospace activities in Canada. Francois Quentin, Thales senior VP in charge of aerospace activities, says: “Thales has a long and prestigious history as a key partner to Canada’s aerospace and defence establishments. Its roots go back to the early 1980’s, when Thales first established a domestic presence in Canada. “Thales’ Canadian aerospace activities play a key role as the central hub for the regional and business aircraft market and represent a worldwide centre of excellence for flight control systems.” From Montreal, Thales provides avionics systems for regional and business aircraft with customers ranging from Bombardier, Embraer, Sukhoi, Gulfstream and Dassault Falcon. It is currently equipping Air Canada’s entire fleet with its in-flight entertainment systems. Source: Air Transport Intelligence news http://www.flightglobal.com/articles/2008/02/11/221483/thales-opens-expanded-facility-in-montreal.html
  13. A future world-class animation hub creating 500 jobs by 2020 http://www.newswire.ca/news-releases/cinesite-opens-major-animation-studio-in-montreal-canada---a-future-world-class-animation-hub-creating-500-jobs-by-2020-568037871.html MONTRÉAL, Feb. 8, 2016 /CNW Telbec/ - Cinesite has chosen Montréal, Québec, to make its investment in a new state of the art animation studio with the intention of getting nine feature animated films into production over the next five years. This was announced today by Antony Hunt, CEO of the Cinesite Group, and the Premier of Québec, Philippe Couillard at the opening of the new 54,000 sq ft Animation Studio in downtown Montréal. The new facility will have the capacity to employ 500 permanent staff to work on animated films by 2020.
  14. Another day another poor article about our fair city. Montreal: the jobless capital of Canada Posted on 8/13/2015 10:56:00 PM by Andrew Brennan Inside CAE, which announced Wednesday it was cutting nearly 300 jobs from its flight-simulator facility. Montreal is the jobless capital of Canada, according to Statistics Canada figures. PHOTO: CTV MONTREAL Montreal was once Canada's commercial capital and is considered by many to be its cultural capital—but according to new Stats Can figures it is definitely the unemployment capital of Canada. The latest figures from Statistics Canada puts the jobless rate for metropolitan Montreal at 8.9 per cent, starkly higher than the national average of 6.8 per cent. Some attribute this to taxes. "In Montreal business tax rates are four times what you have in the residential sector, it's one of the highest in Quebec," Senior Vice-President of the Canadian Federation of Independent Business Martine Hébert told CTV News. Others point to demographics, with a metro population growing faster than the jobs can be created. "We want to reverse a little bit the mood right now that is more austerity to prosperity because we need to create an environment where people will feel that it's time to invest," President of Quebec's Council of Employers Yves-Thomas Dorval admitted. The council has other good news. According to the QCE, Quebec has actually created about 40,000 net jobs since the Couillard Liberals were elected. Over 20,000 jobs were created in Quebec last month, but high-paying careers such as in aerospace and engineering are still seeing huge layoffs. On Wednesday, CAE announced it was eliminating nearly 300 jobs from its flight-simulator facility. Other aerospace companies, like Bell Helicopter and Bombardier, have also laid off hundreds of Montreal workers in 2015.
  15. Stinger Dome planned for Loyola campus Concordia University Vice President Services Michael Di Grappa is pleased to announce the Department of Recreation and Athletics plans to build a $4.4 million state-of-the-art dome at its Loyola campus in N.D.G. The Stinger Dome will be an air-supported structure allowing the university to run athletics and recreational activities year round on its south field. A seasonal facility, it will be in operation from November through April, beginning in 2009. “This is an exciting time for Concordia University,” said Di Grappa. “This dynamic project – only the second facility of its kind on the island of Montreal and a first for the Quebec university network– is another example of our commitment to innovation and excellence.” The dome will measure 450 by 240 feet, covering the university’s artificial field located behind Concordia stadium. It can host up to four separate activities at a time. “This project creates many exciting opportunities to engage Concordians and our friends in the community in physical activities, contributing to a healthier lifestyle,” said Katie Sheahan, Director of Recreation and Athletics. “I can’t tell you how happy I am to be in this position. I’m looking forward to the grand opening.” The university looks to Yeadon, a Guelph, Ont. company specializing in state-of-the-art, energy-efficient sports domes that incorporate the latest innovations in design, anchoring, mechanical, electrical and proprietary controls, as the supplier.
  16. University draws inspiration from Chinese cultural heritage Following the concept of “Unity & Modernity”, the University Town Library and Administrative Centre in Shenzhen is the result of a winning design in an international limited competition. The facility was to become a "gateway icon" for the new campus shared by three graduate schools of renowned universities in China. The challenge involved putting three different banks of data under one roof as well as developing a unique approach to library design and knowledge sharing. The project was completed early 2007 and is open to the community, acting both as a public and academic library. Its mission aims to serve the local students, faculty members, corporate researchers and Shenzhen residents. With its long undulating form, the University Town Library meets all requirements needed for the administration centre, culturally symbolic of a "dragon's head", with the library tailing off as its body and the bridge undulating like a "rising dragon". Both library and administrative centre have a double function as pedestrian link and "intellectual bridge" between campuses, the whole set in a green valley-like landscape. Responding to the design brief became an exercise that went beyond the regular scope of programme response. The successful design of such a facility, acknowledged by three awards, reflects a new and innovative way to approach the storage, archiving and transfer of knowledge. RMJM believes the design process grew from the wealth of cultures shared by the talented multicultural and international professionals, their exposure to different cultures yet also the understanding of local demands. http://www.worldarchitecturenews.com/index.php?fuseaction=wanappln.projectview&upload_id=11226