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Found 3 results

  1. Montreal Archipelago This map shows 40 meters of sea level rise. Only half of the world’s ice sheets melted to produce this archipelago. I spent a week in Montreal once–and I’ve been in love with it ever since. I don’t really speak French. I gave names to some of the larger islands, but I don’t know it well enough to do it justice. If you have suggestions, let me know! Buy the map! This will happen someday, but not in our lifetimes. Some who have dared to speculate on a timeline have given themselves plenty of space for error in their predictions–one estimate says anywhere from 1,000 to 10,000 years. Whatever the time frame, anthropogenic climate change is a fact–humans are speeding up this process. For all of these maps, I am not portraying any sea level higher than what is possible. The USGS has estimated that the total rise would be about 80 meters.
  2. Newbie

    RCMP Info

    This is embarrassing. I know it's wrong, but I hope someone can help me, and you are the best informed people I know in Montreal. I left an university library book to be photocopied at Copie 2000 on Sherbrooke Ouest at Peel. Apparently some author made some kind of copyright claim and the RCMP took all of Copie 2000's books for an investigation. Now they (Copie 2000) say they do not have my book and are still waiting for them to be returned by the police. Also they do not want to give me any information about the case at all and seem quite upset and a little bit rude. I wonder if there is any website where I can learn of the suit or if the RCMP would be willing to inform me about it in some way so I can estimate a return date. Is this information public?
  3. http://www.tableaudebordmontreal.ca/alire/alire02/default1.en.html Montréal: a gift to the regions Picher, Claude These days, as soon as you travel a few miles outside Montréal, it’s all the rage to complain bitterly about the “sins and failings” of the metropolis. Here, I’m using the expression that appeared yesterday on the front page of La Presse to introduce the extensive report by my colleague Caroline Touzin on the perception of Montréal in the regions. On this subject, it appears that the regions are ruthless: “Montréal and its inhabitants are guilty of arrogance, blindness, selfishness, and ignorance,” no less! Yet, the reality is this: the regions can howl as much as they want, they’re lucky to have Montréal – and its money. On average, Montrealers are richer than other Quebecers. Because of our progressive tax system, they also pay more taxes. From Gaspé to Rouyn-Noranda and from Baie-Comeau to Huntingdon, the tax dollars of Montrealers pay to build roads, schools, and hospitals; they help finance welfare and unemployment benefits, old age pensions, and other social assistance programs. Without those dollars, the regions could simply not afford to build and maintain infrastructures or provide the same services. By a conservative estimate, we can affirm that at least $4 billion taken from the pockets of Montrealers are redistributed in the regions. Notwithstanding the disputes between city and suburban dwellers, from an economic perspective, Montréal and its suburbs complement each other perfectly. Metropolitan Montréal – or the Island of Montréal and its immediate surroundings (Laval, the South shore from Châteauguay to Boucherville and the northern rim from Deux-Montagnes to Repentigny) – has 3.2 million inhabitants, or 42% of the Quebec population. In 2004, the latest year for which complete tax data is available, the Quebec Government collected a total of $19.6 billion in taxes on personal income. Greater Montréal alone accounted for 48% of this amount, or $9.4 billion. If Montrealers carried a tax burden equal to their demographic weight, therefore, they would pay $1.2 billion less in taxes. But, as we have just observed, they are wealthier, and it is thus only fair that they contribute more to tax revenues. These figures are based on statistics provided by Revenu Québec, which calculates the taxes paid by each administrative region, each municipalité régionale de comté (MRC), and each municipality with 20,000 residents or more. We are just talking about provincial taxes, here. The federal government does not publish such detailed statistics, but because of the similarity of the two tax systems, we can reasonably estimate that Montrealers also send Ottawa $1.2 billion more than called for by their demographic weight. So that brings us to $2.4 billion. The federal government’s three major program expenditures are for old age pensions, transfers to the provinces, and unemployment benefits. Because of the exodus of young people, most regions are aging more quickly than is Montréal. Unemployment hits the regions harder than it does Montréal. And, on a per capita basis, the provincial government’s expenditures are higher in the regions. Put all that together and you don’t need a Ph.D. in math to figure out where the $1.2 billion in federal money is spent. And that’s not all. So far, we’ve only been talking about personal income taxes. This year, Quebec companies will send almost $10 billion in taxes to Ottawa and Quebec City. Given the concentration of businesses in Greater Montréal, we can again make a conservative estimate that 55% of that amount will come from Montréal. Given the demographic weight of our region, that’s $1.3 billion too much. Which brings our total to $3.7 billion. Since, on average, Montrealers earn more than other Quebec residents, they also spend more and pay higher provincial and federal sales taxes. There are no regional statistics on this subject, but Montréal consumers easily send $500 million too much to the two levels of government – based, once again, on their demographic weight. Montréal therefore makes a net transfer of more than $4 billion to the regions, year after year. Of course, this is exactly how it should be. By definition, a rich region has a larger revenue-raising capacity than a poor one, and the system is specifically designed to ensure the redistribution of wealth. But still: before calling Montrealers a bunch of selfish pigs, the whiners in the regions might at least remember that Montréal is the real economic engine of Quebec and that, without the tax money of Montrealers, many of them would have a lot more to complain about.