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Found 6 results

  1. Solid blog. What do you guys think? Huffington Post At the beginning of September, as Sherpa Delegate, I will lead a delegation of 35 young Canadian entrepreneurs, who have been selected to participate in the G20 Young Entrepreneurs Summit in China. They will join some of the top 500 young entrepreneurs of the G20 nations to recommend policies to foster youth entrepreneurship and tackle youth unemployment. Among these 35 Canadians, 16 are from Montreal. This fact clearly reflects that there is currently a boom of new entrepreneurs in this city. As a business person myself, I witness a vibrant entrepreneurial community. Montreal hosts many startup events and hackathons, and boasts an increasing number of incubators and co-working spaces. In the last three years, I have had the opportunity to meet entrepreneurs from various countries, through my active involvement in a global youth movement, called the G20 Young Entrepreneurs Alliance. This international experience has made me realize that Montreal has everything it takes to be among the best cities for entrepreneurs in the world. Like an unpolished diamond, it merely requires some efficient government measures. Technology has enabled even smaller entrepreneur-led businesses to expand into global markets, which can be a powerful driver of growth. We need to implement concerted strategic policies on federal, provincial and municipal levels, to make Montreal a high-standard international entrepreneurial city. Policies that take into account the following points: Firstly, Montreal is the second biggest university city in North America, after Boston. The government should tap into this strong suit in order to make it an entrepreneurial city. We need a clear strategy that encourages and supports the creation of university-based incubators and accelerators in partnership with the private sector, institutions and foundations. University students in Montreal should have the opportunity to start businesses throughout their studies, with the support of and resources from their institutions. As a target, I propose to increase the number of university students involved in entrepreneurship by 50 per cent in five years, and students’ R&D investment/collaboration with entrepreneurs by 50 per cent, to complement formal entrepreneurship education. Secondly, many young entrepreneurs want to go global and do business with other cities, provinces and countries. Technology has enabled even smaller entrepreneur-led businesses to expand into global markets, which can be a powerful driver of growth. We need to devise a joint game plan on federal, provincial and municipal levels, to adopt policies and incentives that support young entrepreneurs as they assess their activities and expand into external markets. For instance, inclusion of young entrepreneurs in trade missions led by our mayor, premier and prime minister, training of diplomats and trade commissioners in the realities of young entrepreneurs, encouraging Montreal incubators to collaborate with those of other countries, and creation of co-working hubs and incubation services for early-stage exporters in diplomatic missions (to trade offices, embassies and consulates). Finally, Montreal is an open, creative and multicultural city, with a great quality of life. Let’s make our city the number 1 destination in the world to start a business! Entrepreneurs are a rare breed. We need to attract them. I suggest federal, provincial and municipal collaboration to implement long-term visas and fast clearance for entrepreneurs. A landing pad for entrepreneurs, in conjunction with university-based incubators and the private sector, is also required. On August 26, 2016, the Obama administration proposed a rule aimed at attracting thousands of the world’s best and brightest entrepreneurs, to start the next great companies in the United States. I think our federal government should be inspired by this initiative. The city of Montreal plans to release an orientation paper on its international relations in the coming months. I sincerely hope our municipal administration integrates “Montreal as an international entrepreneurship capital” into its vision. Winston Chan is an entrepreneur and former Chairman of the Federation of Young Chambers of Commerce in Quebec. Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  2. Solid blog. What do you guys think? Huffington Post At the beginning of September, as Sherpa Delegate, I will lead a delegation of 35 young Canadian entrepreneurs, who have been selected to participate in the G20 Young Entrepreneurs Summit in China. They will join some of the top 500 young entrepreneurs of the G20 nations to recommend policies to foster youth entrepreneurship and tackle youth unemployment. Among these 35 Canadians, 16 are from Montreal. This fact clearly reflects that there is currently a boom of new entrepreneurs in this city. As a business person myself, I witness a vibrant entrepreneurial community. Montreal hosts many startup events and hackathons, and boasts an increasing number of incubators and co-working spaces. In the last three years, I have had the opportunity to meet entrepreneurs from various countries, through my active involvement in a global youth movement, called the G20 Young Entrepreneurs Alliance. This international experience has made me realize that Montreal has everything it takes to be among the best cities for entrepreneurs in the world. Like an unpolished diamond, it merely requires some efficient government measures. Technology has enabled even smaller entrepreneur-led businesses to expand into global markets, which can be a powerful driver of growth. We need to implement concerted strategic policies on federal, provincial and municipal levels, to make Montreal a high-standard international entrepreneurial city. Policies that take into account the following points: Firstly, Montreal is the second biggest university city in North America, after Boston. The government should tap into this strong suit in order to make it an entrepreneurial city. We need a clear strategy that encourages and supports the creation of university-based incubators and accelerators in partnership with the private sector, institutions and foundations. University students in Montreal should have the opportunity to start businesses throughout their studies, with the support of and resources from their institutions. As a target, I propose to increase the number of university students involved in entrepreneurship by 50 per cent in five years, and students’ R&D investment/collaboration with entrepreneurs by 50 per cent, to complement formal entrepreneurship education. Secondly, many young entrepreneurs want to go global and do business with other cities, provinces and countries. Technology has enabled even smaller entrepreneur-led businesses to expand into global markets, which can be a powerful driver of growth. We need to devise a joint game plan on federal, provincial and municipal levels, to adopt policies and incentives that support young entrepreneurs as they assess their activities and expand into external markets. For instance, inclusion of young entrepreneurs in trade missions led by our mayor, premier and prime minister, training of diplomats and trade commissioners in the realities of young entrepreneurs, encouraging Montreal incubators to collaborate with those of other countries, and creation of co-working hubs and incubation services for early-stage exporters in diplomatic missions (to trade offices, embassies and consulates). Finally, Montreal is an open, creative and multicultural city, with a great quality of life. Let’s make our city the number 1 destination in the world to start a business! Entrepreneurs are a rare breed. We need to attract them. I suggest federal, provincial and municipal collaboration to implement long-term visas and fast clearance for entrepreneurs. A landing pad for entrepreneurs, in conjunction with university-based incubators and the private sector, is also required. On August 26, 2016, the Obama administration proposed a rule aimed at attracting thousands of the world’s best and brightest entrepreneurs, to start the next great companies in the United States. I think our federal government should be inspired by this initiative. The city of Montreal plans to release an orientation paper on its international relations in the coming months. I sincerely hope our municipal administration integrates “Montreal as an international entrepreneurship capital” into its vision. Winston Chan is an entrepreneur and former Chairman of the Federation of Young Chambers of Commerce in Quebec. Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  3. 31 juil. 2013 - par Pierre Duhamel L’entrepreneuriat au Québec? Pas fort, si l’on en croit les médias et les spécialistes du domaine. Les entrepreneurs seraient «historiquement moins nombreux que dans le reste du Canada», nous apprenait La Presse lundi. «Le Québec serait sérieusement en retard sur ses voisins canadiens et américains en matière de création de PME», affirme Pierre-Karl Péladeau. «Les indices du dynamisme entrepreneurial au Québec sont généralement inférieurs à ceux obtenus dans le reste du Canada», soutient depuis des années la Fondation de l’entrepreneurship. Pourtant, rien dans les statistiques officielles ne soutient un tel pessimisme. Je ne parle pas ici d’un sondage où des gens expriment leurs intentions de se lancer en affaires ou rendent compte des démarches qu’ils ont effectué pour créer une entreprise, mais des données réelles colligées par Statistique Canada sur le nombre d’entreprises au pays. Dans mon livre sur l’entrepreneuriat, je constatais que le Québec comptait en 2011 un nombre d’entreprises de plus de deux employés qui correspond, grosso modo, à son poids dans l’ensemble canadien. En revanche, l’Ontario comptait proportionnellement moins d’entreprises compte tenu de son poids démographique. J’ai été manifestement peu ou mal lu. Je persiste et signe: il n’y a pas de retard entrepreneurial au Québec. Cela n’existe pas. Voici donc de récentes données à l’appui de mon propos. Si on ne compte que les incorporations, qu’importe le nombre d’employés, il y a avait au Québec, en décembre 2012, 220 954 entreprises, soit 21,7 % des sociétés au Canada. Cela est légèrement inférieur au poids démographique du Québec (23,6%), mais c’est aussi le cas pour l’Ontario, malgré ses 355 211 entreprises. L’Ontario représente 35 % des entreprises de toutes les tailles et 38,3% de la population. Si je prenais en compte dans mon livre des entreprises de plus de deux employés, c’est que je ne voulais pas inclure les travailleurs autonomes comme moi qui, bien que propriétaire d’une entreprise, ne sont pas des employeurs et donc de véritables entrepreneurs. Éliminons donc les micro-entreprises et ne tenons compte que des entreprises qui comptent cinq employés et plus. Il y a 100 889 entreprises qui se qualifient au Québec, contre 141 240 en Ontario, dont la population est pourtant 1,6 fois plus nombreuse. Le Québec compte pour 24,3 % des entreprises de plus de cinq employés au Canada. Allons voir du côté des moyennes entreprises, celles qui ont de 100 à 499 employés. Il y en a en tout 7 814 au Canada, selon la BDC. 27 % d’entre elles ont leur siège social au Québec. Cette proportion n’était que de 25 % en 2006. Loin de s’affaiblir, la position du Québec tend donc à s’améliorer. La BDC a son propre indice pour identifier les régions où l’entrepreneuriat est le plus dynamique. Le Québec est pratiquement au niveau national. Au cours des 12 dernières années, le Québec a devancé l’Ontario à sept reprises. Faut-il plus d’entrepreneurs au Québec? Sans aucun doute. Nos PME ont-elles de formidables défis devant elles? Assurément. Ont-elles des difficultés à atteindre une taille conséquente et à devenir des moyennes, puis des grandes entreprises? Oh que oui! Je ne pense pas que c’est en disant aux Québécois qu’ils sont de piètres entrepreneurs, en retard sur tout le monde, que nous parviendrons à créer ce mouvement irrésistible en faveur de l’entrepreneuriat et de la prise en main de notre économie Lien: http://www.lactualite.com/opinions/le-blogue-de-pierre-duhamel/lincrevable-mythe-du-retard-entrepreneurial-du-quebec/
  4. Cmon guys… we gotta do better than this. http://argent.canoe.ca/nouvelles/montreal-bonne-derniere-sur-la-liste-des-villes-entrepreneuriales-19102015 Montréal, dernière sur la liste des villes entrepreneuriales Montréal décroche la pire performance canadienne lorsqu’il s’agit de soutenir le démarrage et la croissance des entreprises de son territoire. La métropole québécoise se fait d’ailleurs damer le pion par plusieurs villes régionales québécoises, rapporte une étude récente de la Fédération canadienne de l’entreprise indépendante (FCEI). Le dernier rang de Montréal sur 121 villes canadiennes découle de la compilation de données en provenance de Statistique Canada, des administrations municipales et gouvernementales et de divers sondages pancanadiens réalisés auprès de PME portant sur la présence des entreprises dans les communautés, les perspectives d’avenir et les politiques municipales en matière d’imposition et de réglementation des entreprises. « À Montréal, les problèmes de circulation, de stationnement, les travaux routiers et la difficulté d’obtenir des permis, tout cela ensemble, crée un environnement difficile pour les affaires », reconnaît Simon Gaudreault, économiste principal pour la Fédération canadienne de l'entreprise indépendante (FCEI).
  5. Solid blog. What do you guys think? Huffington Post At the beginning of September, as Sherpa Delegate, I will lead a delegation of 35 young Canadian entrepreneurs, who have been selected to participate in the G20 Young Entrepreneurs Summit in China. They will join some of the top 500 young entrepreneurs of the G20 nations to recommend policies to foster youth entrepreneurship and tackle youth unemployment. Among these 35 Canadians, 16 are from Montreal. This fact clearly reflects that there is currently a boom of new entrepreneurs in this city. As a business person myself, I witness a vibrant entrepreneurial community. Montreal hosts many startup events and hackathons, and boasts an increasing number of incubators and co-working spaces. In the last three years, I have had the opportunity to meet entrepreneurs from various countries, through my active involvement in a global youth movement, called the G20 Young Entrepreneurs Alliance. This international experience has made me realize that Montreal has everything it takes to be among the best cities for entrepreneurs in the world. Like an unpolished diamond, it merely requires some efficient government measures. Technology has enabled even smaller entrepreneur-led businesses to expand into global markets, which can be a powerful driver of growth. We need to implement concerted strategic policies on federal, provincial and municipal levels, to make Montreal a high-standard international entrepreneurial city. Policies that take into account the following points: Firstly, Montreal is the second biggest university city in North America, after Boston. The government should tap into this strong suit in order to make it an entrepreneurial city. We need a clear strategy that encourages and supports the creation of university-based incubators and accelerators in partnership with the private sector, institutions and foundations. University students in Montreal should have the opportunity to start businesses throughout their studies, with the support of and resources from their institutions. As a target, I propose to increase the number of university students involved in entrepreneurship by 50 per cent in five years, and students’ R&D investment/collaboration with entrepreneurs by 50 per cent, to complement formal entrepreneurship education. Secondly, many young entrepreneurs want to go global and do business with other cities, provinces and countries. Technology has enabled even smaller entrepreneur-led businesses to expand into global markets, which can be a powerful driver of growth. We need to devise a joint game plan on federal, provincial and municipal levels, to adopt policies and incentives that support young entrepreneurs as they assess their activities and expand into external markets. For instance, inclusion of young entrepreneurs in trade missions led by our mayor, premier and prime minister, training of diplomats and trade commissioners in the realities of young entrepreneurs, encouraging Montreal incubators to collaborate with those of other countries, and creation of co-working hubs and incubation services for early-stage exporters in diplomatic missions (to trade offices, embassies and consulates). Finally, Montreal is an open, creative and multicultural city, with a great quality of life. Let’s make our city the number 1 destination in the world to start a business! Entrepreneurs are a rare breed. We need to attract them. I suggest federal, provincial and municipal collaboration to implement long-term visas and fast clearance for entrepreneurs. A landing pad for entrepreneurs, in conjunction with university-based incubators and the private sector, is also required. On August 26, 2016, the Obama administration proposed a rule aimed at attracting thousands of the world’s best and brightest entrepreneurs, to start the next great companies in the United States. I think our federal government should be inspired by this initiative. The city of Montreal plans to release an orientation paper on its international relations in the coming months. I sincerely hope our municipal administration integrates “Montreal as an international entrepreneurship capital” into its vision. Winston Chan is an entrepreneur and former Chairman of the Federation of Young Chambers of Commerce in Quebec. Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  6. (Courtesy of the Financial Post) Reason I put it in culture, it seems more of a Quebec culture to be more laid back and no really care about material wealth, but that is my own point of view.