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Found 19 results

  1. General Electric a des croûtes à manger si elle veut grignoter l'avance de Pratt&Whitney Canada dans le marché des turbopropulseurs. Pour en lire plus...
  2. Les dirigeants de compagnies comme Microsoft et General Electric. soutiennent que l'incapacité de venir à la rescousse de l'industrie bancaire est une menace pour l'économie. Pour en lire plus...
  3. GE Capital, la filiale de services financiers du conglomérat américain General Electric, s'apprête à supprimer jusqu'à 11 000 emplois, soit 15% de ses effectifs. Pour en lire plus...
  4. http://www.masstransitmag.com/press_release/12142808/the-first-quebec-100-electric-bus-is-unveiled Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  5. Peggy Hollinger, Industry Editor, FT Collaboration aims to have a part-electric test aircraft in the air by 2020 Tests will be carried out on a BAE146 with one of the four turbines replaced by a two megawatt electric motor Airbus, Rolls-Royce and Siemens have announced plans to collaborate on a hybrid test aircraft that will fly by 2020. The companies have formed a partnership to build a technology demonstrator with an electric motor that will help during take-off and the climb to cruising altitude. They aim to have a commercially viable hybrid regional passenger jet flying by the 2030s. A growing number of companies are exploring the potential of hybrid power in aviation. Boeing last month acquired Aurora Flight Sciences, a cutting edge US aviation research company. Boeing has also taken a stake in Washington-based aerospace start-up Zunum as it steps up its pursuit of autonomous and electrically powered flight. Zunum aims to have a 10-12 seater all electrically powered aircraft flying by 2022 and to eventually scale up to 50-100 seaters by 2030. Roland Berger, the management consultancy, estimates that 70 electrical propulsion aircraft programmes have been launched globally, about half by start-ups. The partnership announced on Tuesday will focus on developing an aircraft capable of carrying 50-100 passengers. The tests will be carried out on a BAe146 regional aircraft and one of the four turbines will be replaced by a two megawatt electric motor. “This is the first concrete step to prove what is possible,” said Mark Cousin, Airbus head of group demonstrators. He estimated that the fuel savings of hybrid propulsion would be “into the double digits”. While hybrid-electric cars are becoming increasingly commonplace on roads, adoption of the technology in aviation has been held back by the weight and power density of batteries. Frank Anton, Siemens vice-president of eAircraft, said this hurdle could be cleared in a relatively short time as battery technology is developing exponentially in response to demand from the auto sector. “We will have to get 10 times more power out of the same weight,” he said. “This is our homework. But we believe we can get there.” The pressure is on aviation to deliver cleaner propulsion. The industry accounts for 2 per cent of global man-made carbon dioxide emissions, but this is expected to triple by 2050 as demand for air travel accelerates. The number of passengers is forecast to double in the next 20 years alone. Electrically powered aircraft would help reduce the noise and emissions pollution from this growth. The partners are hoping to win UK funding for the project, although they refused to quantify the cost. Airbus, Siemens and Rolls-Royce are initially targeting the regional travel market for their hybrid aircraft. Paul Stein, chief technology officer of Rolls-Royce, said quieter and cleaner hybrid-electric power would allow airports to be sited more closely to urban areas. “It has the potential to move transport from rail to air, and gives the opportunity to connect any city pairs,” he said.
  6. Salut la gagne! Etant à Vancouver, je vais en profiter pour poster des choses qui pourraient être d'intérêt pour Montréal. Vancouver council considers mandatory installation of electric car chargers City could require 10 per cent of new condo parking spots to include electric car chargers BY JOANNE LEE-YOUNG, VANCOUVER SUNJULY 8, 2009 Vancouver city council will soon decide whether to force developers to install electric car-charging stations in at least 10 per cent of all new condo parking lots -- a proposal that's creating a chicken-or-the-egg debate. If the vote goes through Thursday, Vancouver would be the first city in Canada with such a mandate for residential buildings. In addition to the 10-per-cent requirement for condo parking spaces, it would also see the city install a limited number of public charging stations at its EasyPark lots, eventually expand this to include on-street locations, and develop a strategy for retrofitting existing buildings. "Electric cars are coming. They are in Europe and in Japan," said Mayor Gregor Robertson, echoing observers who see that while Vancouver might lead Canada, it would be playing catch up to many cities elsewhere, such as San Francisco and Paris, which already each have hundreds of charging stations and growing culture for electric car use. "We need to be prepared." City staff estimate that the cost of installing chargers for 10 per cent of parking spaces, with allowance for future upgrades, would cost less than 0.5 per cent of the building cost. They believe that, while this would be a new cost to developers, it would "enable early adoption of EVs [electric vehicles] in our community, allow for later expansion as the market demands, allow the development industry to test the market take-up and introduce limited new costs that are not likely to adversely affect land values." The proposal would include an 18-month grace period for these requirements and support "developers to find possible strategies to offset the new incremental costs associated with this infrastructure." This, however, seems to be of little comfort to developers, who would like to see the ratio for charging stations reduced from 10 per cent to five per cent of parking stalls. In April, city staff made a proposal to the Urban Development Institute, which represents developers, that charging infrastructure would be required for 20 per cent of parking stalls. UDI responded that this ratio was too high, "given the cost of providing the infrastructure, the lack of widespread market penetration of the vehicle technology, and BC Hydro's capacity to deliver the additional power required to charge these vehicles." On Tuesday, Jeff Fisher, deputy executive director of UDI, said the organization is working with the city, but has some specific concerns. "We are always supportive of going green and efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, but we want to make sure that this is the right green-car technology. There are a number out there. We have had hydrogen fuel cell vehicles and concepts like the 'hydrogen highway' for some time. We feel it might be premature to mandate this." He added that while 0.5 per cent of the cost of the building is small, "when you look at the cost of other fees that the industry is facing, in aggregate, it is more significant." Fisher said that, for now, UDI would prefer to see a voluntarily or incentive-based approach to making charging stations available. Part of the conundrum is that there are currently fewer than 10 such electric vehicles in the city. A few months ago, the City of Vancouver and BC Hydro signed an agreement with Mitsubishi Motors to use its newly-launched iMiev electric vehicle as test run models for their fleets. It's not clear yet exactly how many vehicles this will involve and exactly when they would arrive, but the hope is that orders would quickly increase. Don Chander, past president of the Vancouver Electric Vehicle Association, which supports the proposal, said that providing infrastructure for charging electric vehicles in all new multi-family residential buildings is increasingly important as density increases. He added that some 18 major automakers have announced electric vehicle models, making it "urgent to start building this infrastructure." The VEVA estimates that the average cost of implementing EV infrastructure at the time of construction is around $1,500 per parking stall. [email protected] - - - Read Joanne lee -young's blog at vancouversun.com/pacificwaves © Copyright © The Vancouver Sun
  7. Le conglomérat américain annonce des résultats en baisse mais conforme aux attentes mais la récession se fait sentir. Pour en lire plus...
  8. Le diffuseur appartenant à General Electric débourserait 3,5 G$ US pour faire l'acquisition du canal spécialisé en météo. Pour en lire plus...
  9. APRIL 6, 2009, 9:17 PM By JIM MOTAVALLI G.M.’s P.U.M.A. prototype in Manhattan. General Motors may be so short of cash that bankruptcy is among its dwindling options, but the company is still in the business of creating dreams. Its latest dream, the P.U.M.A. mobility pod, to be unveiled Tuesday in New York, is pretty far out — and as such, requires no big immediate investments. Indeed, Larry Burns, G.M.’s vice president for research and development and strategic planning, said the P.U.M.A. prototype cost “only one half of one percent of G.M’s typical engineering budget” for a year. Of course, the P.U.M.A. (for Personal Urban Mobility and Accessibility) is not really a car, and it’s not really being introduced, except as a bit of blue-sky thinking about better ways to move around crowded urban areas than driving an automobile. Mr. Burns has used the phrase “reinvention of the automobile” before, in relation to fuel-cell vehicles like the G.M. Sequel. But the P.U.M.A., a joint project with Segway, the New Hampshire-based creator of self-balancing two-wheel scooters, is quite different. Think of a larger, two-passenger, sit-down version of the Segway PT, with two gyroscopically balanced wheels. The prototype has minimal bodywork, but podlike enclosures (which look like computer mice on wheels) are imagined for production. If it gets that far. If all of this conjures visions of a rickshaw, well, the prototype does somewhat resemble one. Mr. Burns imagines Singapore, which has rickshaws, as one possible early market. The P.U.M.A., which will be displayed at the New York International Auto Show (which opens to the public on Friday), is an electric vehicle powered by lithium-ion batteries. James D. Norrod, the president and chief executive of Segway, says it has a 35-mile range and 35 m.p.h. top speed. A three-hour charge costs, not surprisingly, 35 cents. It is, in essence, a neighborhood electric vehicle, or N.E.V., whose limited speed keeps it off highways (and, in most states, off roads with speed limits over 35). Mr. Burns said that six P.U.M.A.’s would fit in a standard parking space. A new N.E.V. — many are little more than glorified golf carts— is not going to reinvent the automobile. Despite the claims by proponents of such vehicles that they serve the driving needs of many millions, they have failed to make much of a dent in the car market. Ford abandoned its Neighbor N.E.V. when it sold the Norwegian company that made it, Think Nordic, at the end of 2002. Fewer than 6,000 Neighbors were sold in the United States that year. Chrysler still sells Global Electric Motorcars vehicles, which have had some success in gated communities. In a meeting Monday with editors and reporters at The New York Times, Mr. Burns pulled out his cellphone to make a point: Project P.U.M.A. vehicles would be designed to tap into the two-way communications made possible by G.M.’s OnStar technology, which has six million North American subscribers. The vision is expansive: using “vehicle to vehicle,” or V2V, communications, these “100 percent digital” devices would communicate with one another over a quarter-mile range to prevent collisions, eventually allowing what G.M. calls “autonomous driving and parking.” Mr. Burns imagines a hands-free urban driver ignoring dense city traffic to concentrate on sending text messages from a PDA clipped in to serve as a dashboard, while the mobile Internet pod moves toward its destination. “My daughter sleeps with her iPhone in her hand,” Mr. Burns said. “At this point, is using a cellphone the distraction, or has driving become the distraction?” There’s more: the pods would also be equipped to communicate with the smart grid of the future (as is the Aptera EV, another podlike electric vehicle that is due to be introduced in the fall), returning electricity to utilities during times of peak demand. That’s not V2V, it’s V2G — vehicle to grid. NYT_VideoPlayerStart({playerType:"article",videoId:"1194839263765",adxPagename:"wheels.blogs.nytimes.com/video"}); The Segway PT costs $5,000, so the more capable 600-pound P.U.M.A. would presumably be priced considerably higher, though Mr. Burns declined to speculate where the sweet spot might be. “This is a prototype, not a product,” said Mr. Norrod of Segway. “We have not made a decision to commercialize it.” Mr. Burns concluded his remarks by offering a glimmer of what his company could become if it managed to transform the urban roadscape. “We were the S.U.V. company, and we accept that,” he said. “We want to become the U.S.V. company — known for ultra-small vehicles.” Copyright 2009 The New York Times CompanyPrivacy PolicyNYTimes.com 620 Eighth Avenue New York, NY 10018 http://wheels.blogs.nytimes.com/2009/04/06/gm-conjures-up-a-people-moving-pod/?pagemode=print
  10. Interesting to see Montreal take a leadership position in this space. http://montreal.ctvnews.ca/mobile/montreal-to-get-106-new-electric-car-charging-stations-by-june-1.2626788 Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  11. Read more: http://www.wired.com/autopia/2012/09/tesla-supercharger/ Tesla going to have their Supercharger stations in Canada by 2015/16. I have a feeling, when there will be more electric vehicles on the road, we might be seeing Hydro-Quebec stations.
  12. (Courtesy of Engadget) It is a good initiative, but will Quebec mandate by a certain year everyone needs to have an electric vehicle?
  13. APRIL 2, 2009, 7:57 AM Nissan Rolls On With Its Electric Car By BRADLEY BERMAN Nissan is using the Cube as a test mule for its electric drivetrain. The design for its electric car, due in 2010, will be original. SACRAMENTO, Calif. — President Obama’s auto task force cast doubt this week on the business case for the Chevrolet Volt, the extended-range electric vehicle from General Motors. The task force’s written assessment said big cost reductions were needed to make the vehicle “commercially viable.” Nissan, however, is gushing with confidence about the business case for its pure electric car, which goes on sale to fleets in 2010 and to retail customers in 2012. “This is not a test or demonstration,” Mark Perry, a product planner for Nissan said here on the second stop of a 12-city tour. “We’re ready for mass production.” The company won’t reveal the name of the electric car, and it won’t reveal what it will look like. For the company’s dog-and-pony show, it is using a Japanese-market Nissan Cube outfitted with the same electric drivetrain that will go into a newly designed electric car. The only similarity between the Cube and Nissan’s mystery electric car is the size — something similar to a four-door Nissan Sentra. Mr. Perry told me the car will have an “iconic electric vehicle” look, without being “Jetsons or Blade Runner.” Driving range will be 100 miles, with a full recharge time of four hours from a recommended 220-volt charger (and eight hours for 110v). My three-minute spin around the parking lot of the Cal Expo was completely unremarkable. And that is Nissan’s point — to prove that its E.V. is just like a normal car. To show that its E.V. is as a viable alternative to a gas-powered sedan, Nissan is pricing it just like one. The company is targeting a price of around $25,000-$30,000. A $7,500 federal tax credit for electric vehicles with at least l6 kilowatt-hours of energy storage — the Nissan EV will exceed that — could drop the cost below $20,000. The company said it believed the lower cost of electricity versus gasoline will create an instant payback for customers. “Batteries are a lot of the expense. But we’re moving to mass production as fast as we can to reach economies of scale,” Mr. Perry said. Nissan has a 51 percent share in the Automotive Energy Supply Corporation, a joint venture to produce batteries with Japan’s NEC Corporation. Nissan said this experience will help it reduce expenses. The lithium-ion battery for a $25,000 electric vehicle could cost $10,000 or more. “We’re confident in the battery, because it’s our battery,” Mr. Perry said. “Our engineers developed it.” Copyright 2009 The New York Times CompanyPrivacy PolicyNYTimes.com 620 Eighth Avenue New York, NY 10018 http://wheels.blogs.nytimes.com/2009/04/02/nissan-rolls-on-with-its-electric-car/?pagemode=print