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Found 18 results

  1. Projects in and around Edmonton, Alberta First a little background. http://edmonton.com/ <header style="box-sizing: border-box; font-family: SinewRegular, sans-serif; font-size: 16px; line-height: 16px;"><section id="hero" style="box-sizing: border-box; padding: 240px 0px 60px; text-align: center; height: 900px; background-image: url(<a href=" http:="" edmonton.com="" img="" background-large_r.jpg);"="" target="_blank"><footer style="box-sizing: border-box; padding: 2em;"> </footer></section></header>
  2. Edmonton's economy hottest in Canada: CIBC Western city tops ranking for first time as Calgary slips into second spot OTTAWA -- Edmonton's weather may be cold but its economy isn't, says CIBC World Markets, which reported Monday that the Alberta capital has the hottest local economy in Canada, surpassing Calgary. Montreal, Toronto and Vancouver also rank high in economic activity, while there's little economic momentum in the national capital region of Ottawa-Gatineau, according to CIBC's economic activity index, which is based on nine economic variables. "For the first time on record, the city of Edmonton tops our city ranking in terms of economic momentum," it said, crediting strong population growth, impressive employment gains, low unemployment rate, and below-average personal and corporate insolvency rates. Calgary, meanwhile, slipped into second spot with a score of 24.5, compared with 30.1 for Edmonton. Calgary's slippage reflects what the report said was a slowdown in the pace of job creation momentum in the city -- less than that of Edmonton, Saskatoon and Victoria -- and a cooler housing market. Saskatoon reached third spot with a score of 23.7, propelled by strong job and population growth, and the hottest housing market in the country. "Interestingly, Montreal is currently enjoying some renewed momentum," the report said, noting that Montreal's third-place score of 22.8 -- the only other city with a ranking above 20 -- indicated improvement in labour and housing market activity. However, the report cautioned that the momentum in Montreal's industrial economy -- based on data up to September -- is not likely sustainable with a loonie at or near parity with the U.S. dollar. Toronto, the country's largest city, had a consistently strong showing in the rankings with a score of 17.5. This reflects the growing diversity of the city, which has the fourth-fastest population growth in the country, and which boasts relatively high-quality employment. However, its labour market is softening with below-average job growth and above-average unemployment of 7%. Vancouver's ranking, at 17.3, just slightly below Toronto's, is due to the fact that -- while it did not excel in any area -- the city was above average in many areas, including strong population and job growth. Among the larger cities, Ottawa-Gatineau had the lowest ranking at just 4.7, reflecting what the report's author CIBC economist Benjamin Tal said was "some softening in employment growth, housing activity and non-residential building permits." There has been a cooling in the city's large high-tech sector, which was very strong over the past two years. The other cities and their rankings were: Sherbrooke 16.3, Victoria 15.8, Trois-Rivieres 13.6, Regina 12.5, Saint John 11.4, Quebec City 10.2, Halifax 9.1, Kitchener 8.8, Greater Sudbury 7.9, London 7.8, Hamilton 6.0, St. John's 5.5, Kingston 3.4, Thunder Bay 3.0, St. Catharines-Niagara 2.4. Two cities had negative readings -- Saguenay -2.8 and Windsor -3.3 -- highlighting the difficulties in their manufacturing sectors. "The recent appreciation in the dollar and the weakening in the U.S. economy are probably adding another layer of difficulties facing those cities," the report said.
  3. Selon cet article paru dans le brossard eclair au mois de décembre dernier. A termes avec les phases a venir, il s'agirait du 2e plus grand centre commercial au canada après le West Edmonton Mall http://virtuel.brossardeclair.canoe.ca/doc/hebdo_brossard-eclair/bro_03122009_opt/2009120201/
  4. The tallest hotel in the country was finished last year. No it's not in Toronto, Vancouver, Calgary or even Edmonton. It is in Niagara Falls! It is 58 floors, 177 meters!
  5. Le contrat consiste en la fabrication et le montage de la charpente d'acier qui servira à construire la Edmonton Clinic North, à Emonton, en Alberta. Pour en lire plus...
  6. Canada's housing market cools Home prices are still rising but much more slowly.Tyler Anderson/National PostHome prices are still rising but much more slowly. Resale price growth lowest in seven years Garry Marr, Financial Post Published: Friday, June 13, 2008 More On This Story TORONTO -- The Canadian real estate market is being flooded with homes, causing prices to start falling in some key markets, according to the Canadian Real Estate Association. The average price of a home sold last month in the country's top 25 markets was $337,071, an all-time record. But that record price was only up 1.1% from May, 2007 -- the smallest year-over-year increase in seven years. "The record number of new listings means more opportunities for buyers," said Gregory Klump. chief economist with CREA. "The resale housing market has evolved in just a few short months." CREA said there were 67,628 new units on the market in May, a 7% jump from last year. It was the second straight month that a record number of houses has gone on sale. The impact on prices is being felt most keenly in Alberta. The average price of a home sold in Calgary last month was $418,881, a 2.4% drop from a year ago. Edmonton sale prices averaged out at $340,499, down 4.8% from a year ago. Unit sales in both Alberta cities are also plummeting. Calgary homes sales were off 34.2% from a year ago while Edmonton sales were down 34.8% during the same period. The home sales are dropping across the country. CREA said on a national basis sales were off 16.9% in May from a year earlier.
  7. Edmonton a conclu une entente avec la compagnie sherbrookoise Enerkem pour produire de l'éthanol à partir de matières résiduelles issues du recyclage et du compostage. Il s'agit d'une première au Canada, basée sur l'expertise technologique du Québec. Pour en lire plus...
  8. List of the busiest airports in Canada Passenger traffic 1. Toronto Pearson International Airport Toronto, Ontario 31,507,349 ▲1.7% 2. Vancouver International Airport Vancouver, British Columbia 17,495,049 ▲3.4% 3 Montréal-Pierre Elliott Trudeau International Airport Montreal, Quebec 12,407,934 ▲8.3% 4. Calgary International Airport Calgary, Alberta 12,240,786 ▲8.5% 5. Edmonton International Airport Edmonton, Alberta 6,065,117 ▲16.3% 6. Ottawa Macdonald-Cartier International Airport Ottawa, Ontario 4,090,000 ▲7.4% 7. Winnipeg James Armstrong Richardson International Airport Winnipeg, Manitoba 3,565,501 ▲8.7% 8. Halifax Stanfield International Airport Halifax, Nova Scotia 3,469,062 ▲2.7% 9. Victoria International Airport Victoria, British Columbia 1,481,606 ▲6.6% 10. Kelowna International Airport Kelowna, British Columbia 1,363,239 ▲11.1% . . . Québec - Jean Lesage International Airport Quebec, Quebec 877,000 ▲12.5% Plus d'info sur Montréal ici: Fr: http://admtl.com/a_propos/salle_de_presse/statistiques.aspx More stats on Montreal here: En: http://admtl.com/a_propos/salle_de_presse/statistics.aspx
  9. Ce n'est peut-être pas la meilleure source sur le recyclage montréalais, mais bon, je suis tombé sur cet article qui décrivait la situation à travers le pays... Recycling rates vary greatly across nation Municipalities that make it easy for people to dispose of garbage have higher diversion rate Jul 16, 2007 04:30 AM Kristine Owram Canadian Press Statistics Canada says Canadians are recycling and composting more than ever before, but whether they compost their coffee grounds or recycle their milk cartons seems to have a lot to do with where they live. While cities like Montreal and Calgary struggle to divert even a third of their waste from landfills, others expect to be recycling or re-using up to 90 per cent of their solid waste within a few years. In Markham council has been working for years to find ways to divert as much waste as possible from landfills. Through a combination of public education and pilot projects, they've managed to reduce the amount of waste headed to the dump to just 30 per cent. Regional councillor Jack Heath, chairman of Markham's waste diversion committee, said the solution was simple: picking up recyclable and organic waste – blue boxes and green bins – twice as often as garbage. "If you want to throw your banana peels and your dirty diapers in the garbage, you can hang onto them for two weeks," Heath said. "Or, you can throw them in the green bin and we'll collect them every week." Heath said all it took to reach 70 per cent diversion – a rate Toronto, which currently sits at about 42 per cent, has set as a "long-term goal" – was a little political will. "People had some trepidation, but after a few weeks they said, `This isn't that difficult,'" he said. "It was the strong will of council to solve the problem that basically changed the system, and that's how we got to where we are." Statistics Canada's Households and the Environment Survey, released Friday, found the proportion of household waste recycled by Canadians increased from 19 per cent in 2000 to 27 per cent in 2004. The survey also found that 27 per cent of Canadian households composted in 2006, up from 23 per cent in 1994. In Edmonton, councillors brought the public on board by making it easy for them to recycle, said Garry Spotowski, a spokesperson for the city's waste management division. Edmonton has been a trailblazer in the field of waste diversion since 1988, when the city became one of the first in North America to introduce a blue-box recycling program. Many cities, including Ottawa and Vancouver, ask residents to separate paper from metals, plastics and glass. Most cities ask residents to throw organic waste in green bins, separate from the rest of their garbage. Edmonton residents, however, need only put recyclables in blue bags and the rest into garbage bags; the city takes care of all the sorting, Spotowski said. "Instead of going to a landfill, it goes to the Edmonton composting facility, where it's sorted and any material that doesn't compost is screened out," he said. "It's actually very simple. We emphasize convenience as much as possible." The city currently diverts about 60 per cent of its waste from the dump, but that figure is expected to reach 90 per cent within a few years once a new "gasification" facility opens to convert residual waste into gas for heating, transportation and producing electricity, said Spotowski. Larger cities like Toronto, however, are struggling to catch up. In 2002, Toronto's Keele Valley landfill site was closed and the city began shipping its garbage to Michigan for disposal. At that point, the city had a waste diversion rate of only about 25 per cent, said Geoff Rathbone, Toronto's director of solid waste programming. Since then, the city has introduced a green bin program, which it will extend to apartment buildings and other multi-family homes by next year. It also plans to introduce a new pay-as-you-toss system for garbage. All this will contribute to the city's 10-year plan to increase diversion to 70 per cent, Rathbone said. Halifax is close behind Edmonton with a diversion rate of 55 per cent. Although they ask residents to separate organics from recyclable containers from newspapers from garbage, they take a similar approach to ensure nothing gets left behind. "You know you'll never have 100 per cent compliance, meaning that hidden inside that black garbage bag, you'll still have some items that shouldn't be there," said Jim Bauld, manager of solid waste resources for the Halifax Regional Municipality. "So every bag is opened." http://www.thestar.com/News/article/236301
  10. Alberta's heritage savings fund hit hard The Canadian Press October 14, 2008 at 4:45 PM EDT Edmonton — Falling stock prices have sliced roughly $1 billion from Alberta's rainy-day savings account. Finance Minister Iris Evans told the legislature that the value of the Heritage Savings Trust Fund has been reduced to $16-billion — a drop of roughly 6 per cent since June. But she says the loss is only on paper because the province isn't selling any of the stocks that have lost value recently. Evans is promising a further update on the heritage fund at a public meeting Thursday in Edmonton and again in the second-quarter fiscal update next month. Premier Ed Stelmach has said there's nearly $8 billion set aside in a separate fund that will be used to maintain government programs at current levels if the economy falters. Mr. Stelmach said last week the province is not immune to current market fluctuations, but is “prepared to weather any storm.”
  11. Monday, September 29, 2008 Migration 2006/2007 Previous release Data are now available on the number of individuals who moved between July 1, 2006 and June 30, 2007. At the provincial level, Alberta had the highest net migration rate, with 16.4 people for every 1,000 population. British Columbia followed and Ontario was third. Among census metropolitan areas, the highest net inflow occurred in Kelowna, which had a net inflow of 22.0 migrants for every 1,000 residents. Edmonton and Calgary were second and third, respectively. In absolute terms, Toronto had the highest net inflow, with 74,195 more people moving into the metropolitan area than moving out. Vancouver ranked second and Montréal third. Of the 33 metropolitan areas, 29 had a net inflow from migration, while 4 experienced a net outflow. Among census divisions, the highest net inflow relative to population size occurred in Division No. 16 in Alberta, which includes Fort McMurray. It had a net inflow of 53.5 migrants for every 1,000 population. This was almost twice the net gain of the previous year, reflecting the robust economy related to oil sands development. Note: Migration data reflect interprovincial and international movements as well as intraprovincial moves between census metropolitan areas or census divisions. Moves across town or across the street are excluded. Migration estimates (91C0025, various prices) are available for the provinces and territories, census metropolitan areas and census divisions. Five tables covering these levels of geography provide data on origin and destination, as well as the age, the sex and the median income of migrants. 2006/2007 2006/2007 2005/2006 in out net net rate per 1,000 population Kelowna1 10,817 7,124 3,693 22.0 ... Edmonton 52,242 34,803 17,439 16.5 21.0 Calgary 61,456 43,551 17,905 16.2 21.5 Toronto 175,127 100,932 74,195 13.7 17.3 Vancouver 78,021 47,919 30,102 13.3 16.4 Saskatoon 12,671 9,610 3,061 12.9 5.8 Regina 8,730 6,809 1,921 9.6 0.5 Victoria 15,295 12,144 3,151 9.4 7.2 Oshawa 15,698 12,770 2,928 8.5 10.5 Barrie1 10,964 9,477 1,487 8.2 ... Moncton1 5,882 4,830 1,052 8.1 ... Ottawa–Gatineau 45,212 36,633 8,579 7.3 7.1 Abbotsford 10,586 9,506 1,080 6.6 6.8 St. John's 6,608 5,403 1,205 6.6 5.0 Guelph1 7,235 6,368 867 6.6 ... Halifax 15,754 13,254 2,500 6.5 3.8 London 17,450 14,430 3,020 6.4 6.8 Kitchener 19,638 16,783 2,855 6.2 8.0 Winnipeg 24,003 19,603 4,400 6.2 2.3 Sherbrooke 7,979 6,797 1,182 6.2 5.3 Brantford1 5,440 4,629 811 6.0 ... Montréal 91,421 69,731 21,690 5.9 5.6 Québec 20,123 15,953 4,170 5.7 5.9 Trois-Rivières 5,266 4,494 772 5.4 6.0 Hamilton 24,236 21,579 2,657 3.7 3.7 Kingston 7,395 6,914 481 3.1 0.8 Greater Sudbury 5,230 4,818 412 2.5 5.2 Peterborough1 4,701 4,446 255 2.2 ... Saint John 3,411 3,378 33 0.3 -1.7 St. Catharines–Niagara 9,996 10,046 -50 -0.1 2.0 Thunder Bay 3,920 4,331 -411 -3.3 -5.9 Saguenay 3,487 4,281 -794 -5.2 -7.1 Windsor 8,519 10,293 -1,774 -5.3 -0.7 Provincial migration 2006/2007 2006/2007 2005/2006 in out net net rate per 1,000 population Alberta 181,291 126,035 55,256 16.4 20.3 British Columbia 169,068 118,281 50,787 11.8 12.3 Ontario 428,738 338,108 90,630 7.1 9.6 Yukon 1,472 1,309 163 5.2 0.4 Saskatchewan 40,058 35,408 4,650 4.7 -4.7 Quebec 197,757 168,238 29,519 3.9 4.4 Manitoba 39,686 35,171 4,515 3.8 1.1 Prince Edward Island 3,316 3,481 -165 -1.2 -2.5 New Brunswick 21,104 22,494 -1,390 -1.9 -2.6 Nova Scotia 26,706 28,678 -1,972 -2.1 -1.1 Northwest Territories 2,392 2,532 -140 -3.3 -20.4 Nunavut 897 1,037 -140 -4.6 -4.7 Newfoundland and Labrador 13,986 17,938 -3,952 -7.7 -7.5 http://www.statcan.ca/Daily/English/080929/d080929c.htm
  12. Valeur des permis de construction pour juin 2014 (en million $) Montreal 1432 Toronto 1277 Calgary 811 Edmonton 542 Vancouver 489 Otta/Gat. 244 K.C.W. 126 Quebec 124 Winnipeg 121 Hamilton 100
  13. Adapter l'urbanisme à l'hiver : l'exemple d'Edmonton Le mercredi 8 février 2017 [TABLE=class: visuel] <tbody>[TR] [TD][/TD] [/TR] [TR] [TD=class: legende] Daniel Cournoyer, directeur général de la Cité francophone devant l'une des cabines chauffées par le soleil à Edmonton. Photo : Radio-Canada/Dominic Brassard [/TD] [/TR] </tbody>[/TABLE] Montréal pourrait s'inspirer de l'architecture et de l'urbanisme de la capitale albertaine pour devenir une véritable ville d'hiver, croit Dominic Brassard. Edmonton a installé, dans les parcs de la ville, de petites cabanes en bois entièrement chauffées par le soleil pour réchauffer les citoyens. « Leur conception est géniale. Elles ne coûtent presque rien à construire et se démontent facilement au printemps », précise le journaliste. Néanmoins, la stratégie hivernale d'Edmonton va bien au-delà de ça. L'aménagement urbain prend en considération le vent, capte la lumière du jour, etc. Une autre façon d'aménager la ville est de construire des terrasses qui restent ouvertes tout l'hiver. « Ça favorise la vie de quartier! Ça vous permet de manger ou de prendre un café en même temps que vous regardez un piéton qui marche », ajoute Dominic Brassard. Adapter l'urbanisme à l'hiver : l'exemple d'Edmonton | Le 15-18 | ICI Radio-Canada Première
  14. Le taux pour les principales villes Entre parenthèses figure le taux pour janvier. - Saguenay 6,3 (5,6) - Québec 5,1 (5,0) - Sherbrooke 7,0 (6,8) - Trois-Rivières 8,1 (8,5) - Montréal 9,2 (9,0) - Gatineau 6,1 (6,6) - Ottawa 6,0 (5,7) - St-Jean, Terre-Neuve 7,6 (7,8) - Halifax 5,8 (5,4) - Moncton 6,6 (7,1) - Toronto 8,6 (8,6) - Winnipeg 5,8 (5,8) - Regina 4,4 (4,4) - Calgary 5,2 (5,4) - Edmonton 5,3 (5,0) - Vancouver 6,7 (7,0) - Victoria 5,3 (5,7)
  15. En lisant cet article d'aujourd'hui dans La Presse j'ai découvert le Art Gallery of Alberta, inauguré récemment. http://www.cyberpresse.ca/voyage/canada/201009/10/01-4314487-edmonton-la-ville-qui-fait-boom.php?utm_categorieinterne=trafficdrivers&utm_contenuinterne=cyberpresse_B2_voyage_264_accueil_POS1 Penser que les gens à Edmonton ont plus d'audace architectural qu'à Montréal...soupir.
  16. 71 étages à Edmonton !? Et bien ! http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2013/11/04/the-edmontonian-tower_n_4213552.html
  17. ...de Only The Lonely (SSP) J'ai toujours été curieux de voir de vraies statistiques sur l'obésité, autres que fameux 36% d'Américains... Montréal est plutôt dans le milieu de ces métropoles, mais parmi les 6 plus peuplées, seule Calgary est plus obèse. Tout ça malgré le fait qu'on ait le moins de fast-foods par habitant? 21,2 % est bien pire que j'imaginais, il me semble qu'on parlait de ~16% pour le Canada (il y a 2-3 ans). Aussi, Only The Lonely fait remarquer quelque chose d'intéressant :