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Found 8 results

  1. The small town of Triberg, Germany is creating big headlines these days, after its mayor designated a number of difficult or tricky parking spaces for men-only. Mayor Gallus Strobel has risked countless accusations of sexism after marking the town's toughest parking spots with a male or female symbol depending on their level of difficulty. "Men are, as a rule, a little better at such challenges... There are also great women drivers who are, of course, most welcome!" Mayor Strobel told German newspaper Süddeutsche Zeitung. The idea behind this new policy was designed to attract ambitious drivers to utilize more difficult spaces. Parking spaces which are wider, well-lit and close to exits have been painted with female symbols, while narrow, obstructed and awkwardly angled spots have been labeled with male symbols. So far the parking challenge has been met with mixed opinions, however its also increased tourism to the area, as countless drivers have traveled to the small town in order to test their parking abilities. A major study in Britain earlier this year showed that while women might be slower at parking, they are more accurate and have better technique. The survey also suggests men liked to "pose park" by opting to park in a smaller spots, even when a larger spot is available. http://worldnews.msnbc.msn.com/_news/2012/07/10/12664764-german-mayor-designates-parking-spaces-just-for-men?lite
  2. http://www.nationalpost.com/most-popular/story.html?id=2501508 I remember I used to listen to Expos games on CIQC when I was a kid. Another piece of Montreal dies...
  3. This is why we love Montreal and what makes our city so unique. I miss the newspaper stands, the neon lights of cinema palaces. Why is it so difficult to put a Tramway in Montreal? I think 'Colette' may be Janette Bertrand : ) http://www.nfb.ca/film/montreal_by_night/
  4. Frustrated by how difficult it is to contact Montreal's 311 service, a couple of friends and I have built this handy web app: chermtl.ca It works on desktop and on mobile. This is not a for profit project, but simply our proposed solution to what we see as a very outdated system. We take care of bundling up and forwarding reports to different instances of the city's boroughs using a partially automated system. Please give it a try and let me know what you think
  5. Read more: http://www.cnn.com/2012/06/13/world/europe/eye-on-georgia-lazika/index.html
  6. Who else is tired of the non-stop traffic around town ? And few or no measures to redirect traffic proprely! All roads lead to headache as repairs, more cars pile up Published: 21 hours ago JASON MAGDER, The Gazette Published: 21 hours ago Joseph Simon has been driving a taxi in Montreal for 19 years, and he says traffic in the last few months is the worst he's ever seen. "My clients have left my car to walk the rest of the way; it's happened three times already," he said yesterday while sitting in his black Buick Century, waiting at a taxi stand on Metcalfe St. in front of the Sun Life Building. "Traffic has been terrible this summer." Several of his fellow taxi drivers agreed. "It's blocked everywhere this year," said Hayssam Hamad, a 12-year veteran who works for Diamond Taxi. "Every year, there is more and more traffic." Montrealers are used to road construction in the summer and fall, but it seems this year has been particularly difficult. In addition to construction on several major highways, many arteries in the city core also are under repair. Add to that the 135 inspections of road structures ordered by the Johnson commission investigating the causes of last year's overpass collapse in Laval, and you have a recipe for traffic mayhem. Mario St-Pierre, a spokesperson for Quebec's Transport Department, said there isn't more construction than usual. "But the construction maybe affects more people," he said. "Especially with the Ville Marie Expressway (which since June has had several lanes closed for repairs). It's very difficult to divert the traffic there." He added there are more cars travelling to and from Montreal than ever before. According to figures from the Auto Insurance Board, car ownership in the areas around Montreal shot up between seven and 11 per cent between the years 2000 and 2005. In Montreal, there were 3.1 per cent more cars in the same period. Yesterday, motorists had a double dose of gridlock to contend with during the morning rush hour. An accident forced the closure of the Montreal-bound lanes of the Mercier Bridge. To make matters worse, the Transport Department closed Côte de Liesse Expressway to and from the Dorval Circle for emergency repairs to the underpass that gives eastbound cars access to Trudeau airport, causing backlogs on Highway 20 westbound, an area usually free of traffic problems in the morning. Yesterday at 7:30 a.m., cars backed up for a kilometre on Highway 20, causing about a half-hour delay, said André Marcotte, the Transport Department's director of planning for the Montreal region. The traffic caused some people to miss their flights yesterday morning, said Christiane Beaulieu, the vice-president of public affairs for Aéroports de Montréal. Some airport employees also were late for work because the parking lot for employees is located where the worst gridlock occurred, she said. The situation eased slightly in the afternoon when westbound Côte de Liesse was reopened. Things should improve even more this morning as the eastbound part from Marshall Ave. to the Dorval Circle is expected to be reopened. The underpass will remain closed until tomorrow and eastbound traffic to the airport will be diverted onto Michel Jasmin Ave. (the expressway's service road) and the Marshall Ave. overpass. The underpass was one of 135 structures flagged for inspection by the Johnson commission. It was found to be structurally deficient. With just 20 inspections carried out so far, Montrealers can expect many more temporary road closures in the coming months. Back at the taxi stand, Hamad said he doesn't mind the highway repairs so much, it's the work being done in the downtown core that is really hurting him. "On the highway, there's just a bit of a delay where the construction is, and then it clears up afterward," he said. He added it has been particularly difficult navigating on de Maisonneuve Blvd., where a bicycle path is being constructed, and on Sherbrooke St. near Amherst St., which has been closed since June for repairs after a section of the road collapsed. There were several other problems downtown recently: part of Bleury St. was closed for a weekend this month. It's still off-limits for heavy trucks. A section of the downtown core was closed last month when cracks were found in a concrete slab in the underground city near the McGill métro station. One block will remain closed for the next few months while crews work to remove the slab and replace it. [email protected] - - - And looking down the road, there's trouble circling More traffic headaches are in store for Highway 20 next year, as the Quebec Transport Department starts work on the much-anticipated reconfiguration of the Dorval circle. André Marcotte, the Transport Department's director of planning for the Montreal area said an announcement of the $150 million project will be made in the coming months. Preliminary work will be done this year with the demolition of a derelict building near the Via Rail train station. The major work will start next year, for completion in 2010. The project will reduce congestion to and from the airport by eliminating the traffic lights in the Dorval circle, Marcotte said. Christiane Beaulieu, Aéroports de Montréal's vice president of public relations, said this is welcome news. "The No. 1 complaint we get about the airport is that it is difficult to access," she said. "This is very good news." The project has been delayed many times in the past. It was originally planned for completion by 2001.
  7. Cinema industry: Montreal perks up by Guillaume Picard View all articles from Guillaume Picard Article online since August 20th 2007, 9:48 Be the first to comment this article Filming in Montreal is substantial, year after year. The city is one of the major production centres in North America. (Photo: Studio Mel’s) Cinema industry: Montreal perks up The filming of blockbuster “The Mummy III” has been going on for a few days in the Cité du cinéma, which in itself is proof that the glorious days of filming in Montreal have returned after a difficult three-year period. American studios ignored our city and there was a decrease in production volume during that difficult time. When Brad Pitt arrived downtown in the spring to film “The Curious Case of Benjamin Button,” with director David Fincher, (who also directed the successful “Seven” and “Fight Club”), the whole city was excited to see the handsome husband of Angelina Jolie. The Quebec Cinema and Television Office (French acronym: BCTQ) believes that 2007 could generate a production volume beyond $250 million and sales of more than a billion dollars, half of which will go to salaries. That should meet the bread and butter of some 35,000 people who work in the 500 cinema companies in Quebec. In July alone, the results were past the half-way mark achieved in 2006, making up for the difficult three years we experienced. Twelve long Quebec films are in the process of shooting this summer, as well as 15 television series and four American films (a couple of which are “Mr. Nobody” and “Afterwards”). Michel Trudel, owner of Cité du cinéma, the largest cinematography centre in North America, confirms that 2007 “is a good year for the entire industry. Several conflicts since 2004 have now been settled on the part of unions and producers. These days, foreign film producers know which ones they should be working with and it’s going a lot better.” But Mr. Trudel already sees another conflict in the horizon for July 2008; that is, the conflict involving American actors. Will that be another blow for Montreal? “That can hurt us, since the studios will want to film quickly before summer, delaying other projects. If the conflict is not settled, it will be fatal because the damage will be done. The industry will slow down for several weeks or months”, Mr. Trudel explained. He manages 18 filming studios in Montreal and St. Hubert. Courting Hollywood is no easy task. More than 35 states now have incentives and tax cuts to attract the major California studios. Europe and East Asia also are increasingly offering their own incentives. “Our goal”, says Hans Fraiquin, (National Commissioner of the BCTQ) “is to continue to go higher and to ensure that Montreal becomes a production centre of international calibre. We have always been behind Toronto and Vancouver, but in three years, we hope to be on equal footing with them.” Tax credit for filming in the region Just before summer holidays and following a meeting with the Minister of Culture and Communications Christine Saint-Pierre, BCTQ officials insisted on the importance of “implementing more attractive and more competitive incentives”, Mr. Fraiquin explained. Local productions can very well take three fourths of the production volume.” Economically speaking, that’s not the same for Montreal without foreign productions. Americans are helping us in terms of cash flow,” says Daniel Bissonnette, director of Montreal’s Cinema and Television Office which has been coordinating the filming with the boroughs since 1979. For his part, Mr. Bissonnette hopes to implement an additional credit to support filming in the region. “The unions have agreed to a zone of 25 km of which the central point is the Papineau subway station. They have a higher fee for filming beyond these parameters. A 6%-7% credit, for example would attract film companies that would otherwise go elsewhere. That wouldn’t necessarily be expensive for us and would make us very competitive. Even Montreal and its workers would benefit, as well as the governments and regions.” According to him, the governments “will recover their investments significantly on taxes imposed on workers and taxes deducted left and right. Even with the tax credit that has gone from 11% to 20% in Quebec, the government comes out the winner.” Montreal is one of the ten major film production centres in North America: -35,000 jobs -500 production and post-production companies -1 billion and more of returns on investment each year, of which 50% will be for salaries -75% of the production volume related to local productions -16% federal tax credit -20% Quebec tax credit -500 various productions in 2006 -5000 filming permits issued in 2006 (Photo: Studio Mel’s)