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Found 7 results

  1. The Redpath mansion at 3457 du Musee was demolished March 2014. It will be replaced with student residences in August 2015. 23 appartments 89 bedrooms 1200$ / bedroom / month rooftop deck August 2015
  2. Until Montreal scrapped its streetcars in 1959, the Craig Terminus was one of the hubs of the city's sprawling tramway network. Located near the corner of St. Urbain and Craig (now Viger St. Antoine), 14 different tram lines merged into this imposing stone building, built in 1925. It was demolished in 1970 when the Ville Marie Expressway tore through a huge swath of downtown Montreal.
  3. http://forum.skyscraperpage.com/showthread.php?t=178092 Wow, say what you want about Heritage Montreal, the CCA, Les Amis de la Montagne and the OCPM, but this would never be allowed to happen here.
  4. I had rented a Canon L 100-400mm for the weekend,... let me tell you that it is an incredible but also very difficult to manipulate due to sheer weight and shaking issues even with the IS. I took about 500 to 600 pics up there at the Tour de Montréal (Olympics stadium inclined tower). Once i came back home, i noticed many pics were unasble because they were too blurry... (camera shake). Plus, the images aren't incredibly sharp and thats not because of the lense, but I believe because of atmosphere heat and sheer distance ( light diffraction?) plus the fact that i am behind a greenish glass. Anyhow, I managed to capture some incredible angles... I was very surprised with how I saw Montréal from up there. Enjoy! 1. From Parc and Prince Arthur avenue looking south on Parc. (we can see a boat from the port). 2. Up to the tower. 3.To the east with the Biodome and the masses gathering for the closing ceremonies of the Outgames. 4. St-Laurence with the south shore. Larger version 5. closeup 6. some height 6. 7. close up 8. 9. Bateau mouche with the bridges. 10. 11.This scene is so complexe i'll let you figure it out by yourself 12.Old port 13. 14. Tallest back in the days. 18. commie blocks. 19. 20. To the north west, with a plane preparing to land. 21.A view to the east with the port and its activity. More pictures... 22. The incinerators with the huge chimnees will be demolished in the near future i believe. 23.The clusters of Appts far away are in st-Laurent. 24.Chabanel 25. The cluster near the Metropolitan, the twin towers in Laval farther away. 26.What are they building over there that we didn't hear about? 27. Density in the east end... 28. Petrochimical complexes in the east end 29. 30. containers containers containers... 31. unloading... Here's the final part... going down... back on Earth
  5. CNN's Alex Zolbert shows how a 40-story building is being demolished the clean and environmentally friendly way in Japan.
  6. http://www.canada.com/montrealgazette/news/saturdayextra/story.html?id=34389692-7401-4f72-8dc1-0193f394a578&p=1 A partir de samedi le 16aoùt 2008, une série de sept articles sur le patrimoine architectural de Montréal. Ce samedi, le restaurant du 9ième étage de l'édifice-amiral de l'ancien magasin Eaton. Aujourd'hui : le Wilder Block Luxury to the 9TH ALAN HUSTAK, The Gazette Published: Saturday, August 16 Like all cities, Montreal has its share of aging buildings that aren't architecturally significant but contribute to the texture of the streetscape and help identify neighbourhoods. Often, how a building fits into its surroundings is more important than how it looks. When old, familiar structures are torn down to make way for another overscale high-rise, the city is diminished, some say. A bigger problem is that many important buildings in Montreal have been allowed to deteriorate as real estate speculators, developers and politicians spar over profit margins, zoning regulations and height restrictions. Montreal is no longer a place where we tally up heritage losses, as we did in the 1960s and '70s, when sections of historic Old Montreal were razed and mansions in the Square Mile were demolished in the name of progress. Still, urban planners keep tabs on sites they consider at risk. We look at some of the properties on Heritage Montreal's list and invite readers to share their views on whether these places should be saved or surrendered. - - - WITH ITS OPAL GLASS WINDOWS, nickel steel railings, and pink marble columns with black Belgian marble accents, Le 9e dining room in the former Eaton's building downtown remains one of the most staggeringly beautiful art deco rooms in Montreal. But the restaurant has been off limits to the public since the Eaton's department store chain went bankrupt and closed its flagship Montreal store in 1999. Inspired by a trip company matriarch Lady Eaton took aboard the transatlantic luxury liner Île de France in the 1920s, the dining room was incorporated into the plan when Eaton's decided to expand its Ste. Catherine St. store to nine floors from six in 1928. The 650-seat dining room opened on Jan. 25, 1931, as Le François Premier, but the ladies who lunched there never called it that. It was always known as "The Ninth Floor." The room is the work of interior designer Jacques Carlu, the French-born professor of advanced design at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He was also responsible for the celebrated Trocadéro in Paris and the Rainbow Room in New York's Rockefeller Plaza. The restaurant is an elegantly proportioned space, 40 metres long and 23 metres wide, with a 14-metre ceiling. It has two smaller dining rooms off to the side, the Gold Room and the Silver Room. At either end of the main room are two allegorical cubist murals, Pleasure of the Chase and Pleasures of Peace, painted by Carlu's wife, Natasha. Initially, the Ninth Floor foyer offered a panoramic view of the city, but the vista disappeared as more skyscrapers arose downtown. Even before the restaurant opened, The Gazette enthused over its opulence. "Spacious and lofty, it is a room fit for a palace," an article in the paper said at the time. It was never a high-end gourmet restaurant, but the food was substantial, the ambience luxurious, and the wait staff attentive and motherly. After Eaton's closed, the building was sold to Ivanhoe Cambridge, a real-estate arm of the Caisse de dépôt et placement du Québec, which invests funds from the Quebec Pension Plan. There were rumours the site would be incorporated into a luxury hotel - which was never built - and it would reopen as a swank supper club. It has been used occasionally for private functions. Even though the Ninth Floor has been declared a heritage site by the provincial government, that classification does not oblige the owner to maintain or conserve the space. An official of Ivanhoe Inc., which owns the former Eaton's building, confirmed the real-estate firm has entertained several offers but has not decided what to do with the property. What should be done? Preserve it: The Ninth Floor restaurant and the elevator shafts leading to it were declared a heritage site by Quebec's Culture Department in 2001. If that floor of the former Eaton's store continues to be mothballed, it might be forgotten altogether or converted into private offices, inaccessible to the public. Forget it: The plumbing at the Ninth Floor requires a major overhaul to meet health standards. And without nine floors of retail space beneath the restaurant to attract customers, the room might not be a profitable commercial venue for another 20 or 30 years. - - - Landmarks in limbo: The series Today: Le 9e, popularly known as the Ninth Floor, the art deco restaurant at the former Eaton's store downtown. Day 2: The Wilder Block on Bleury St. Day 3: The Redpath Mansion on du Musée Ave. Day 4: The Montreal Planetarium at St. Jacques and Peel Sts. Day 5: Grain Elevator No. 5 on Montreal's waterfront. Day 6: Louis-Hippolyte Lafontaine House, at Overdale Ave. and Lucien L'Allier St. Day 7: The Guaranteed Pure Milk Co. bottle, overlooking Lucien L'Allier St. [email protected] montrealgazette.com Share your views Which historical and cultural sites in Montreal should be maintained? Which should be demolished? Give us your opinion at montrealgazette.com/soundoff A trip through the past Log on to our website to view a slide show of Montreal's threatened landmarks and hear the history behind them. Go to montrealgazette.com/galleries
  7. You might already heard about the Park-Extension Footbridge which is planned to be demolished soon. I think it can be preserved rather than being destroyed. Here are some of my designs I created during summer. Visit this website for more information on the footbridge: http://www.histoireparcextension.org/news-nouvelles/shpehs-speaks-out-prend-parole-structures-risk-2012 Proposal Scene Footbridge Alternative