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Found 3 results

  1. Louis Audet: la Charte des valeurs menace l'économie Le président et chef de la direction de Cogeco s'est prononcé, mardi, contre la charte des valeurs proposée par le gouvernement péquiste. Louis Audet a déclaré que la charte, qui limiterait le port de signes religieux pour les employés de l'État, nuirait à l'économie québécoise. Lors d'une allocution devant la Chambre de commerce du Montréal métropolitain, M. Audet a affirmé que la charte aurait pour effet de diminuer le nombre d'immigrants adoptant la province comme terre d'accueil et, par le fait même, réduirait la richesse que ces nouveaux résidants contribuent à créer. Il a également dénoncé ce qu'il a décrit comme les préjugés défavorables au milieu des affaires, qui seraient de plus en plus forts au Québec. Louis Audet a mentionné un récent sondage effectué par CROP pour Cogeco selon lequel la moitié des Québécois croient que les entreprises privées ne profitent pas à la société. D'après M. Audet, les entreprises privées jouent un rôle essentiel dans la création d'emplois et de richesse, en plus d'être nécessaires pour soutenir les programmes sociaux. http://www.lesaffaires.com/secteurs-d-activite/general/louis-audet-la-charte-des-valeur-menace-l-economie/565718
  2. WOW just wow! http://www.architizer.com/en_us/blog/dyn/38638/azerbaijan-to-build-one-kilometer-tall-skyscraper/ Developers in Azerbaijan are planning to build a kilometer-high tower that would, obviously, be the world’s tallest. As News.az reports, Haji Ibrahim Nehramli, president of the Avesta Group of Companies, promises that the Azerbaijan Tower, as the project is being called, would rise 1,050 meters with 189 floors to dwarf both the Burj Khalifa (by 220 meters or 722 feet) and the Kingdom Tower currently planned for Jeddah, Saudi Arabia (by 50 meters or 164 feet). That’s not all. The Avesta Group will be planting their tower on an artificial island in the Caspian Sea, at the foot of virginal beaches and crystalline waters . The Azerbaijan Tower will be the crowning centerpiece of the Khazar Islands, a $100 billion city of 41 artificial islands that will spread 2,000 hectares over the Caspian. The buoyant metropolis is being planned for 1 million residents, who will be housed in endless rows of high-rises ranging for 25 to 60 stories in height with access to over 150 schools, 50 hospitals and daycare centers, plus numerous parks, shopping malls, cultural centers, university campuses, and even a Formula 1 racetrack. The city will be equipped with a robust network of “innovative” bridges and infrastructure that will link outlying islands to the urban core, while a large municipal airport will provide access to and from the radiant city. To briefly focus on the tower itself–much could be said on the vacuity of the entire project–the admittedly comical form altogether shuns the slim, shard-like profiles that characterize the current crop of Brobdingnagian skyscraper design. Instead, it curiously alludes both to the platonic massings of Constructivist projects (via corporate High-Tech of ’80s and ’90s) and various paper arcologies of the last quarter of the past century, from the Metabolists to the Sims. Construction on the Azerbaijan Tower is set to break ground in 2015 and will continue onto completion in 2018-2019 at a cost of $2 billion. And like all of the city’s other structures, the tower has been designed to withstand up to a 9.0 magnitude quake. The Khazar Islands are scheduled to be ready by 2022. LOL:
  3. http://motherboard.vice.com/read/the-nations-most-likely-to-survive-climate-change-mapped?utm_source=clfb The Nations Most Likely to Survive Climate Change, Mapped WRITTEN BY BRIAN MERCHANT January 12, 2015 // 02:10 PM EST See the map images here: http:// http://motherboard-images.vice.com/content-images/contentimage/18229/1421089665711198.jpg Last year, researchers at Notre Dame attempted to determine ​which nations were best equipped to survive climate change—to endure the higher tides, warmer temps, and declining crop yields—and which were poised to falter. Their Global Adaptation Index (GAIN) pegged Norway as the nation most likely to survive, and Chad as the least likely to prosper. The data was compelling, and helped enable a worthy exercise; imagining the welfare of the world's societies under the yoke of planetary warming. Now, web designer Jon Whitling, has visualized that data—inspired by ​my piece, he says (infographic-makers of the world take note! the key to any internet journalists' heart is appealing to their sizable egos)—and the results are worth peeking at. As I noted previously, "the US, Canada, and Australia are big and resource rich—and, importantly, have enough fertile cropland in northern regions to adapt to rising temperatures. For a time, anyway. The worst off are, as usual, the poor countries whose crop yields will fall, water access will decline, and who lack the technology, political economy, and resources to buffer the incoming bouts of extreme weather-filled years." The map makes that clear on a more visceral level. These are the nations most likely to survive climate change, mapped: ​ I don't usually share infographics—in fact, I'm a little surprised folks are still making them, as I thought the ​internet's infographic-for-linkback boom was dead—but this one really does offer a useful context for the GAIN data. It's useful to have a map that, at a glance, helps contextualize which regions are headed for trouble. Not that it's complicated—richer, pole-proximal countries are going to fare better, while poor, equator-adjacent nations will suffer. "We produced this map to highlight that while climate change is caused primarily by rich, technologically advanced countries, it will be the poorest countries that will be hardest hit," Jon Whitling, the map's creator and an employee at the UK-based Eco Experts, told me. "We hope this raises awareness of Africa’s and Asia’s high vulnerability and low readiness for climate change. Ultimately, we want world leaders to act now to limit the impact climate change will have.” TOPICS: climate change, maps, Earth, planet, global warming, carbon, Africa, europe, united states, Norway, chad, poverty, inequality sent via Tapatalk