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Found 5 results

  1. http://www.ctv.ca/CTVNews/TopStories/20100614/hate-crime-report-100614/ The Canadian Press Date: Monday Jun. 14, 2010 9:29 AM ET OTTAWA — Police services are reporting a big jump in hate crimes, and they say gay men are being targeted more often and in the most violent incidents. Statistics Canada says police logged 1,036 hate crimes in 2008, up 35 per cent from 2007. Just over half (55 per cent) were motivated by race or ethnicity, 26 per cent by religion and 16 per cent by sexual orientation. The agency says all three major categories of hate crime increased in 2008, but the largest increase was among crimes motivated by sexual orientation, which more than doubled from 2007 to 2008. Hate crimes motivated by sexual orientation were also the most violent in nature: 75 per cent of them were violent compared with 38 per cent of racially-motivated incidents and 25 per cent of religiously motivated incidents. Among violent incidents motivated by sexual orientation, 85 per cent of the victims were male. StatsCan reports hate crimes motivated by religion increased 53 per cent, while those motivated by race or ethnicity were up 15. Mischief offences such as vandalism to property accounted for 47 per cent of hate crimes, while other non-violent offences comprised 11 per cent. Violence was a factor in 42 per cent of hate crimes. Among the hate crimes motivated by race or ethnicity, almost four in 10 were committed against blacks. Police reported 205 hate crimes against blacks in 2008, up 30 per cent over 2007, but still lower than the 2006 total of 238. South Asians, which includes East Indians and Pakistanis, were the next most commonly targeted group, accounting for 12 per cent of hate-crime incidents motivated by race or ethnicity. Incidents targeting South Asians increased by 21 per cent in 2008. As in previous years, about two-thirds of religiously-motivated hate crimes were committed against the Jewish faith. The agency reports 165 hate crimes targeting the Jewish faith in 2008, up 42 per cent. Police reported 30 hate crimes against the Catholic faith, double the total in 2007. The 26 incidents against the Muslim faith represented a slight drop from 2007. Vancouver and Hamilton reported the highest rates (6.3 hate crimes per 100,000 population) among Canada's 10 largest census cities. Police reported 143 hate crimes in Vancouver in 2008, nearly double the total from the previous year. There were 271 hate crimes reported in Toronto, a rate of 5.4 hate crimes per 100,000 population. Montreal, where police reported 38 hate crimes in 2008, had the lowest rate, at one per 100,000. The agency says the number of hate crimes reported by police in any given area may be influenced by the presence or absence of specialized hate-crime units or initiatives.
  2. How safe is your métro station? http://www.montrealgazette.com/news/Montrealers+safe+your+m%C3%A9tro+station/8972463/story.html Quiet stations tend to have more crime per capita Berri-UQÀM, in eastern downtown, recorded 12.5 million boardings in 2009. There were 20.4 crimes per 1 million boardings. Photograph by: Marie-France Coallier , Marie-France Coallier MONTREAL - For the first time, Montrealers can find out which métro stations see the most crimes. Turns out some least-used subway stops have the highest per capita crime rates. The Gazette has obtained station-by-station statistics after Quebec’s access-to-information commission sided with the newspaper in a three-year battle with the Montreal police department. The figures cover 2008 and 2009, as police only revealed partial information for more recent years. Between 2008 and 2009, criminality jumped at 38 of 64 stations patrolled by Montreal police. At 13 of those, the number of criminal infractions more than doubled. The network’s busiest station, Berri-UQÀM — a transfer point served by three métro lines — saw the largest number of crimes. There were 255 crimes in 2009, up from 243 the previous year. In 2009, 18 stations saw at least 10 crimes involving violence or threat of violence (“crimes against the person”), including Berri-UQÀM (59 cases), Lionel-Groulx (33), Sherbrooke (20) and Vendôme, Snowdon and Jean-Talon (17 each). For every station, The Gazette calculated the number of criminal prosecutions per 1 million passengers who entered the network there. Berri-UQÀM, in eastern downtown, recorded 12.5 million boardings in 2009. There were 20.4 crimes per 1 million boardings. But it was Georges-Vanier, in Little Burgundy southwest of downtown, that recorded the most crimes per capita. At that station — the network’s least used with only 742,000 boardings in 2009 — there were 28.3 crimes per 1 million boardings. Georges-Vanier is a reatlively desolate location, especially at night. It’s next to the Ville-Marie Expressway and no buses serve the station. Beaudry and Monk stations are other examples. Both are among the bottom five for boardings but in the Top 5 for per capita crimes. Click for an interactive map showing crimes in the métro. Reading this on a mobile device? Find the link at the end of the story. The figures give only an approximation of station-per-capita crime rates. The STM only maintains statistics for the number of people who pass through turnstiles at individual métro stations. That means ridership figures used in these calculations only give an idea of how busy stations are. Some stations have few people entering but a high number of passengers disembarking. In addition, transfer stations are busier than boarding figures would suggest because passengers there move from one line to another without going through turnstiles. Bylaw infractions, including graffiti and malicious damage to STM property, were also detailed in the 2008-09 statistics. In more than one-quarter of Montreal métro stations, there were at least 10 bylaw infractions in 2009, with Berri-UQÀM (378 incidents), Sherbrooke (76) and Atwater (67) having the most. The figures obtained by The Gazette cover the 64 stations on Montreal Island and Île Ste-Hélène. Laval and Longueuil stations are patrolled by their respective police forces. Every year, Montreal police publish crime statistics for the entire métro network, but the force has resisted providing more detailed data. After failing to convince the access commission that the data should be kept secret (see sidebar), police recently provided The Gazette with the number of crimes and bylaw infractions at every station in 2008 and 2009. But when the newspaper subsequently requested 2010, 2011 and 2012 statistics, the department did not provide comparable data. Instead, it lumped incidents such as lost objects and calls for ambulances with crimes and bylaw infractions, rendering the 2010-12 statistics almost meaningless. The Gazette is appealing the police department's decision to keep the 2010-12 crime figures under wraps. Police and the STM say Montreal has a very low subway crime rate compared with other cities. Crimes in the métro are relatively rare and the métro's overall crime rate has dropped significantly between 2008 and 2012. Montreal police started patrolling the network in 2007. Before that, STM officers were in charge of security in the métro system. The Gazette sought the station-by-station figures so it could tell readers at which station passengers are the most likely to become the victim of a crime or to witness crimes or bylaw infractions. Making the data public also allows the public to monitor progress in reducing incidents at particular stations. [email protected] Twitter: andyriga Facebook: AndyRigaMontreal © Copyright © The Montreal Gazette
  3. Interesting video about the new London skyscrapers http://www.archdaily.com/770542/london-is-becoming-a-bad-version-of-dubai "London is on the verge of being ruined for all future generations," says Alain de Botton – a Swiss philosopher, notable author and founder of The School of Life and Living Architecture. "With a whopping 260 towers in the pipeline no area is safe, as planners, property developers and the mayor's office commit crimes against beauty to create fun buildings." In a film for The Guardian De Botton explains why he believes we're right to be nervous – and how we can stop this "clear desecration" of the UK's capital city. sent via Tapatalk
  4. Montréal n'a jamais recensé aussi peu d'homicides La Presse La police de Montréal a de quoi se réjouir. Depuis la création de son service de police actuel, en 1972, jamais la métropole n'a recensé aussi peu d'homicides sur son territoire. Le Service de police de la Ville de Montréal (SPVM) a annoncé cette semaine les 22e, 23e et 24e homicides de 2008. Mais 24 homicides, c'est encore bien peu pour la métropole: la moyenne des 36 dernières années est de 65, selon les données fournies à La Presse. L'an dernier seulement, le SPVM en a recensé 41. L'année 2008 pourrait permettre de battre le record de 2005 alors que 35 homicides avaient été commis dans l'île de Montréal. Les statistiques sur les homicides sont calculées depuis 1972, année de l'intégration des corps de police des municipalités de la Communauté urbaine de Montréal. «Parfois, une année qui compte peu d'homicides recense en revanche davantage de tentatives de meurtre. Mais cette année, ce n'est pas le cas», a précisé le commandant de la Section des crimes majeurs de la police de Montréal, Clément Rose. Le SPVM compte à ce jour 59 tentatives de meurtre, soit deux fois moins que la moyenne des 10 dernières années. Comment expliquer ces baisses? «En premier lieu, explique le commandant Rose, Montréal n'est plus le théâtre de guerres de motards ou de gangs de rue. Oui, il y a certains conflits, mais ils sont ponctuels.» Jusqu'à aujourd'hui, 7 des 24 homicides sont directement liés aux gangs, contre 14 sur 41 l'an passé. Les autres homicides sont deux crimes passionnels, cinq crimes familiaux, un vol, une querelle, deux règlements de comptes, un crime lié à la mafia, deux aux trafic de stupéfiants, un autre lié à une mauvaise administration de médicament et deux causes inconnues. Le taux de résolution des enquêtes sur les crimes majeurs est jusqu'à maintenant de 80%. En moyenne, il est de 65% à 70%, précise M. Rose. Éclipse, un facteur? Marc Ouimet, professeur à l'École de criminologie de l'Université de Montréal, croit que l'arrivée du Groupe éclipse n'est pas étranger à cette soudaine diminution. Depuis l'été, cette nouvelle escouade de 66 policiers lutte à temps plein contre les gangs de rue. «Quand la pression policière monte, les têtes dirigeantes des groupes criminalisés peuvent dire à leurs membres de se tenir tranquilles, avance M. Ouimet. Les homicides nuisent aux activités commerciales.» Le professeur cite l'exemple du «Boston gun project», un programme de lutte contre les gangs mis en place à Boston en 1995. Le nombre d'homicides avait chuté de 152 à 31 entre 1990 et 1999. Par ailleurs, Marc Ouimet souligne que la criminalité est en baisse constante en Occident depuis le début des années 90. Le vieillissement de la population, la situation économique favorable et le risque de détection plus élevé (ADN, caméras de surveillance, etc.) expliquent cette diminution globale, selon le professeur.