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131 résultats trouvés

  1. 9205 Notre-Dame Est Je n'ai pas beacoup de détail sinon qu'on me parlais de Maison de ville ou de Condo et que le site est une ancienne usine de poisson sur la rue Notre Dame dans Mercier Est Le sondage était demander par prével alliance qui semble être le promoteur. un magnifique site juste en face du parc bellerive avec vue sur le fleuve!
  2. First time posting, hoping for guidance! I want to find a contractor and potential buyers to go in with me on a new building in the mile-ex. I do not know which contractor to use, which lot to build in, or who to buy with. All I know is that I want to live there and I am not satisfied with the current offerings. If you can recommend solutions or people to address any of these concerns, let me know! Feel free to respond in French. Cheers, Will
  3. Après Cote Ouest sur de la Savanne et Rouge sur Victoria, Devmont on eu l'apporbation pour leur prochain projet dans le même quartier. Prelim renderings.
  4. Nom: Condos Saint-M Hauteur: 19 étages Coût du projet: Promoteur: Canvar Architecte: Emplacement: Saint-Henri/Saint-Maurice/Longueuil Début de construction: Fin de construction: Site internet: http://www.condossaintm.com/
  5. Le promoteur MonDev prépare la construction d'un nouveau projet de condo situé sur la rue Jean Talon entre la rue Léonard de Vinci et la 18e avenue. Le projet compte : - 3 étages + un niveau terrasse. - 75 appartements à condo - 1 espace commercial Site du projet : http://www.mondev.ca/condo-montreal-spark-75-nouveau-condos-a-vendre-villeray-saint-michel-et-parc-extension.html?ProjetID=128 Street view du site : https://maps.google.ca/maps?hl=fr&ll=45.563668,-73.594019&spn=0.001065,0.002642&t=h&z=19&layer=c&cbll=45.563668,-73.594019&panoid=ate7DBWeDE1f7rtulrmY1Q&cbp=12,115.04,,0,1.64 Le terrain est dans cet état à cause d'une probable décontamination du site, car il y avait auparavant une station services et un garage.
  6. Downturn Ends Building Boom in New York Charles Blaichman, at an unfinished tower at West 14th Street, is struggling to finance three proposed hotels by the High Line. NYtimes By CHRISTINE HAUGHNEY Published: January 07, 2009 Nearly $5 billion in development projects in New York City have been delayed or canceled because of the economic crisis, an extraordinary body blow to an industry that last year provided 130,000 unionized jobs, according to numbers tracked by a local trade group. The setbacks for development — perhaps the single greatest economic force in the city over the last two decades — are likely to mean, in the words of one researcher, that the landscape of New York will be virtually unchanged for two years. “There’s no way to finance a project,” said the researcher, Stephen R. Blank of the Urban Land Institute, a nonprofit group. Charles Blaichman is not about to argue with that assessment. Looking south from the eighth floor of a half-finished office tower on 14th Street on a recent day, Mr. Blaichman pointed to buildings he had developed in the meatpacking district. But when he turned north to the blocks along the High Line, once among the most sought-after areas for development, he surveyed a landscape of frustration: the planned sites of three luxury hotels, all stalled by recession. Several indicators show that developers nationwide have also been affected by the tighter lending markets. The growth rate for construction and land development loans shrunk drastically this year — to 0.08 percent through September, compared with 11.3 percent for all of 2007 and 25.7 percent in 2006, according to data tracked by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation. And developers who have loans are missing payments. The percentage of loans in default nationwide jumped to 7.3 percent through September 2008, compared with 1 percent in 2007, according to data tracked by Reis Inc., a New York-based real estate research company. New York’s development world is rife with such stories as developers who have been busy for years are killing projects or scrambling to avoid default because of the credit crunch. Mr. Blaichman, who has built two dozen projects in the past 20 years, is struggling to borrow money: $370 million for the three hotels, which include a venture with Jay-Z, the hip-hop mogul. A year ago, it would have seemed a reasonable amount for Mr. Blaichman. Not now. “Even the banks who want to give us money can’t,” he said. The long-term impact is potentially immense, experts said. Construction generated more than $30 billion in economic activity in New York last year, said Louis J. Coletti, the chief executive of the Building Trades Employers’ Association. The $5 billion in canceled or delayed projects tracked by Mr. Coletti’s association include all types of construction: luxury high-rise buildings, office renovations for major banks and new hospital wings. Mr. Coletti’s association, which represents 27 contractor groups, is talking to the trade unions about accepting wage cuts or freezes. So far there is no deal. Not surprisingly, unemployment in the construction industry is soaring: in October, it was up by more than 50 percent from the same period last year, labor statistics show. Experience does not seem to matter. Over the past 15 years, Josh Guberman, 48, developed 28 condo buildings in Brooklyn and Manhattan, many of them purchased by well-paid bankers. He is cutting back to one project in 2009. Donald Capoccia, 53, who has built roughly 4,500 condos and moderate-income housing units in all five boroughs, took the day after Thanksgiving off, for the first time in 20 years, because business was so slow. He is shifting his attention to projects like housing for the elderly on Staten Island, which the government seems willing to finance. Some of their better known and even wealthier counterparts are facing the same problems. In August, Deutsche Bank started foreclosure proceedings against William S. Macklowe over his planned project at the former Drake Hotel on Park Avenue. Kent M. Swig, Mr. Macklowe’s brother-in-law, recently shut down the sales office for a condo tower planned for 25 Broad Street after his lender, Lehman Brothers, declared bankruptcy in September. Several commercial and residential brokers said they were spending nearly half their days advising developers who are trying to find new uses for sites they fear will not be profitable. “That rug has been pulled out from under their feet,” said David Johnson, a real estate broker with Eastern Consolidated who was involved with selling the site for the proposed hotel to Mr. Blaichman, Jay-Z and their business partners for $66 million, which included the property and adjoining air rights. Mr. Johnson said that because many banks are not lending, the only option for many developers is to take on debt from less traditional lenders like foreign investors or private equity firms that charge interest rates as high as 20 percent. That doesn’t mean that all construction in New York will grind to a halt immediately. Mr. Guberman is moving forward with one condo tower at 87th Street and Broadway that awaits approval for a loan; he expects it will attract buyers even in a slowing economy. Mr. Capoccia is trying to finish selling units at a Downtown Brooklyn condominium project, and is slowly moving ahead on applying for permits for an East Village project. Mr. Blaichman, 54, is keeping busy with four buildings financed before the slowdown. He has found fashion and advertising firms to rent space in his tower at 450 West 14th Street and buyers for two downtown condo buildings. He recently rented a Lower East Side building to the School of Visual Arts as a dorm. Mr. Blaichman had success in Greenwich Village and the meatpacking district, where he developed the private club SoHo House, the restaurant Spice Market and the Theory store. He had similar hopes for the area along the High Line, where he bought properties last year when they were fetching record prices. An art collector, he considered the area destined for growth because of its many galleries and its proximity to the park being built on elevated railroad tracks that have given the area its name. The park, which extends 1.45 miles from Gansevoort Street to 34th Street, is expected to be completed in the spring. Other developers have shown that buyers will pay high prices to be in the area. Condo projects designed by well-known architects like Jean Nouvel and Annabelle Selldorf have been eagerly anticipated. In recent months, buyers have paid $2 million for a two-bedroom unit and $3 million for a three-bedroom at Ms. Selldorf’s project, according to Streeteasy.com, a real estate Web site. “It’s one of the greatest stretches of undeveloped areas,” Mr. Blaichman said. “I still think it’s going to take off.” In August 2007, Mr. Blaichman bought the site and air rights of a former Time Warner Cable warehouse. He thought the neighborhood needed its first full-service five-star hotel, in contrast to the many boutique hotels sprouting up downtown. So with his partners, Jay-Z and Abram and Scott Shnay, he envisioned a hotel with a pool, gym, spa and multiple restaurants under a brand called J Hotels. But since his mortgage brokers started shopping in late summer for roughly $200 million in financing, they have only one serious prospect for a lender. For now, he is seeking an extension on the mortgage — monthly payments are to begin in the coming months — and trying to rent the warehouse. (He currently has no income from the property.) It is perhaps small comfort that his fellow developers are having as many problems getting loans. Shaya Boymelgreen had banks “pull back” recently on financing for a 107-unit rental tower the developer is building at 500 West 23rd Street, according to Sara Mirski, managing director of development for Boymelgreen Developers. The half-finished project looked abandoned on two recent visits, but Ms. Mirski said that construction will continue. Banks have “invited” the developer to reapply for a loan next year and have offered interim bridge loans for up to $30 million. Mr. Blaichman cuts a more mellow figure than many other developers do. He avoids the real estate social scene, tries to turn his cellphone off after 6 p.m. and plays folk guitar in his spare time. For now, Mr. Blaichman seems stoic about his plight. At a diner, he polished off a Swiss-cheese omelet and calmly noted that he had no near-term way to pay off his debts. He exercises several times a week and tells his three children to curb their shopping even as he regularly presses his mortgage bankers for answers. “I sleep pretty well,” Mr. Blaichman said. “There’s nothing you can do in the middle of the night that will help your projects.” But even when the lending market improves — in months, or years — restarting large-scale projects will not be a quick process. A freeze in development, in fact, could continue well after the recession ends. Mr. Blank of the Urban Land Institute said he has taken to giving the following advice to real estate executives: “We told them to take up golf.” Correction: An article on Saturday about the end of the building boom in New York City referred incorrectly to the family relationship between the developers William S. Macklowe, whose planned project at the former Drake Hotel is in foreclosure, and Kent M. Swig, who shut down the sales office for a condominium tower on Broad Street after his lender, Lehman Brothers, declared bankruptcy. Mr. Swig is Mr. Macklowe’s brother-in-law, not his son-in-law.
  7. Bonjour à tous, Je suis à la recherche d'un condo, et peut-être que vous serez en mesure de m'aider à trouver un condo parfait pour moi. Voici mes critères : - Vue sur l'eau avec balcon - Construction neuve ou de 3-4 ans max - Rayon de 5km d'un métro (Laval ou Montréal) - Immeuble de plusieurs étages (4++) - Je dois emménager en 2014 - Budget de 230k$ avant taxe, environ 250k$ tx incluse maximum Merci d'avance
  8. Carré VM Coin Ontario et Papineau. 3 étages. En tout, 13 unités de condo résidentiels seront construits, répartis sur les étages supérieurs de l'immeuble. Le rez-de-chaussée, composé d'unités commerciales, s'harmonisera avec la vocation résidentielle de l'immeuble.
  9. hecfrank

    Fibre optique?

    Bonjour, Je viens d'acheter un condo neuf. Je rêve d'avoir de la fibre optique jusque chez moi. Comme le condo est en construction (pas encore, mais bientôt), ça serait bien de pouvoir installer la fibre optique pendant la construction! Ma question: est-ce possible? Qu'est-ce que je dois faire, quelle compagnie dois-je m'abonner? Bell? Merci P.S.: Je suis prêt à payer $1000+ pour l'installation et environ $100 par mois, moins si possible.
  10. Amusant, pour le dernier mois, voici combien de visites (seulement top50) sont arrivés par les engins de recherche (google, bing, yahoo, ...) mtlurb est devenu une vraie marque de commerce on dirait, les gens cherchent ça avant tout 1. mtlurb 1,434 2. bois des caryers 257 3. http://www.mtlurb.com/forums/ 254 4. mtlurb.com 222 5. montreal skyscrapercity 207 6. frank gehry montreal 190 7. unity 3 condos 179 8. echangeur 640 15 164 9. faubourg contrecoeur mtlurb 157 10. five guys montreal 119 11. gallery sur le canal 118 12. mtlurb.com viglione 117 13. m9 phase 4 109 14. mtlurb manoir redpath 107 15. 500 maisonneuve ouest 103 16. chsld st-lambert 102 17. nouvel edifice grand ballets canadien 100 18. mtl urb 90 19. dellarte condos 88 20. carrefour giratoire longueuil 83 21. tour tysel 82 22. few bumps in la belle province's recession ride 76 23. mtlurb skyline de toronto 73 24. architex group 71 25. 400 dowd 70 26. casino de montreal travaux 67 27. édifice sir mortimer b. davis 67 28. "hotel mo" mtlurb 62 29. bois des caryers lasalle 59 30. condo evolo 58 31. samcon medley 55 32. condo zuni prix 52 33. mtlurb le solano 51 34. place du spectrum 51 35. pont de la 25 51 36. tour alta lasalle 49 37. les quatre arbres les architectes boutros + pratte 47 38. résidence soleil 47 39. évolo 31 étages 47 40. acpnc 46 41. gilbert mtlurb 46 42. m9, phase 4 45 43. condo imperial prix 44 44. place de la cité 44 45. la granolerie c'est un arrondissement de montréal! 42 46. quartier 54 prix 42 47. spirit airlines plattsburgh 42 48. lowney phase 8 41 49. réaménagement vieux-port montréal 41 50. 701 university 40
  11. Impossible de copier la description et le croquis du projet donc je copie le lien pour ceux que cela intéresse. Ce petit condo sympathique est situé dans l'arrondissement Ville-Marie mais dans le secteur Est soit le quartier Ste-Marie/St-Jacques ou le Centre-sud. http://www.vimacondos.com/
  12. slanctot

    VersO - 6 étages

    Nouveau projet Accès condo à Lachine - Mise en vente le 12 mars 2011 120 unités, réparties sur 6 étages 1cc à partir de 139 000 $ - 13 900 $ (crédit d'achat de 10%) = 125 100 $ taxes incluses 2cc à partir de 200 000 $ - 20 000 $ (crédit d'achat 10%) = 180 000 $ taxes incluses 3cc à partir de 227 900 $ - 22 790 $ (crédit d'achat 10%) = 205 110 $ taxes incluses [/img] http://www.shdm.org/acces_condos/fr/projet_fiche.php?projet_id=174
  13. Petit projet de condo. 21 unités sur 3 étages et demi. Il n'est pas laid. http://www.terrassesdecarie.com/
  14. Merci à MTLskyline sur SSP Developer’s third design for riverside condo project up for approval http://westislandgazette.com/news/st...-for-approval/ Cheryl Cornacchia | From The Gazette | June 25, 2013 Other News Preliminary approval has been granted to a Montreal developer who wants to build a condominium complex in Pierrefonds-Roxboro alongside the Maison Joseph Théorêt and facing Rivière des Prairies. At a special borough council meeting June 19, council unanimously adopted a draft bylaw to rezone three lots on Gouin Blvd. at Aumais St. so that the Vered Group could build a 115-unit, six-story condominium alongside the heritage home recognized by Montreal’s Conseil de Patrimoine. The draft bylaw is now expected to come up for a second vote at another special borough council meeting, August 5, at which point, if passed, the bylaw would pave the way for the project could to go forward, at least, in theory. On Tuesday, André Giguere said he and other neighbours of the proposed project plan to request the borough open a register that could in effect tie up, if not halt, the condo project entirely, should sufficient number of neighbours sign it and signal their opposition to the project. Johanne Palladini, a borough spokesperson said on Tuesday once a register is opened, area residents would be given a specified day to sign it. If the project is opposed by a certain percentage of area residents, determined by the number of electoral voters, Palladini said, the borough would be forced to hold a costly, borough-wide referendum on the project. http://westislandgazette.com/news/story/2013/06/17/developers-third-design-for-riverside-condo-project-up-for-approval/
  15. Bon je sais que ce n'est pas une grande tour ou quelque chose de révolutionnaire. Mais ce condo est relativement important dans ma propre histoire personnelle. Voyez-vous, ce condo sera construit simplement parce que mon père prend sa retraite bien mérité à 74 ans. C'est assez simple. Mon père travaillais dans le garage à l'arrière plan dans la photo. Depuis maintenant 51 ans, le garage était très occupé avec des contrats de Puro, FedEx, la plupart des taxis du sud-ouest et des clients fidèles, mais puisque son "foreman" prend sa retraite et le propriétaire actuel ne veut tout simplement plus s'en occuper, il a vendu le terrain qui était en demande depuis plus de 10ans. Mon père sera la dernière personne à mettre la clé dans le garage. Le lendemain, il sera mis à terre grâce à quelques coup de pelles bien placé. J'ai effectivement grandi dans ce garage, été voir mon père depuis 34 ans y travailler et faire vivre ma famille depuis toujours. C'est sentimental en effet et je dois dire que je suis un brin nostalgique. La bonne nouvelle dans tous ça, mon père peut finalement se reposer, travailler un peu moins à temps partiel pour d'autres garages qui lui demande de venir les aider de temps à autres. Un homme qui veut vous dire que votre véhicule n'est pas enligner et vous dire de combien de degrés juste en regardant les roues à oeil nu, c'est en demande, même à 74 ans . On dirait que la brique à changé de couleur selon le rendu du site web et celui de l'affiche. http://www.stemarguerite.ca/
  16. http://www.lapresse.ca/maison/immobilier/201606/02/01-4987626-un-condo-sur-trois-vendu-a-perte.php L'immobilier, un moyen assuré de s'enrichir*? Certainement pas pour les Québécois qui ont acheté un condo au cours des trois dernières années. La firme JLR a analysé toutes les transactions impliquant des copropriétés achetées en 2012 ou 2013 et revendues avant le 31*décembre dernier. Sa conclusion*? Près du tiers des vendeurs ont dû se résoudre à accepter un prix égal ou inférieur à celui qu'ils avaient payé*! Plus de la moitié (56*%) des 7195*condos vendus depuis 2012 ont généré un gain de moins de 5*% pour leur propriétaire, révèle l'étude publiée la semaine dernière par JLR. Une fois les frais de courtage, de notaire, les droits de mutation et l'inflation pris en compte, ce gain « se transforme souvent en perte ». La plus-value médiane lors de la revente a été de 3,9*%, toutes transactions confondues, précise l'étude de JLR.  Beaucoup de pertes à Québec La situation est encore pire dans la ville de Québec, où l'orgie de construction des dernières années a entraîné une surabondance de copropriétés sur le marché. Selon l'analyse de JLR, 37*% des condos ont été vendus à un prix égal ou inférieur au coût d'achat dans la Vieille Capitale. La proportion de propriétaires « perdants » grimpe à 62*% lorsqu'on inclut les appartements revendus avec un profit inférieur à 5*%. « Ces résultats corroborent le rapport de l'évaluation du marché de l'habitation de la SCHL, qui indique que le niveau élevé de l'offre de copropriétés demeure inquiétant dans la RMR de Québec », souligne l'étude. JLR conclut qu'il est « peu probable de sortir gagnant d'une revente après un court délai de possession », à moins d'avoir investi en rénovations pour améliorer la valeur de revente de sa copropriété. De quoi faire réfléchir sur ses besoins à court et à moyen terme avant de déposer une offre sur un condo.
  17. Dans le quartier Sainte-Marie, juste à l'ouest du Pont J-C http://www.habitationsgg.com/dp/fr/node/14 22 condominiums René-Lévesque et Falardeau Le RL Condo Bureau des Ventes 2005 René-Lévesque Est Montréal, (Qc)H2K 2M4 Tél.: 514-969-2484 ext. 2 Heures d'ouverture Lundi au Mercredi 12h à 17h Jeudi et Vendredi sur rendez-vous Samedi et Dimanche de 12h à 17h Prix : à partir 208 900$ taxes, terrain et infrastructure inclus à 100% Caractéristiques et Avantages -7 unités sur René-Lévesque -15 unités sur Falardeau-posssibilité de stationnement -Terasse privée sur le toit -plafonds 8 ET 9 -pied en plein coeur de Montréal -Près des festivités et d’un quartier bien vivant -Frais de copropriété peu élevés -5 000 $ d’équipement gratuit EN PRÉVENTE Habiter à deux pas de tout RL CONDO, un développement urbain de 22 condos de une et deux chambres. Situées respectivement sur le boulevard René-Lévesque et sur la rue Falardeau, ces deux phases de trois étages proposent des logements baignant de lumière naturelle et conjuguent qualité et harmonie pour offrir une atmosphère chaleureuse. Un design intérieur raffiné qui brille par son choix de matériaux de première qualité. Un style qui mise sur l’élégance et l’intemporalité. Le tout, situé en plein cœur du centre-ville. Une cuisine au look moderne : comptoirs de quartz, armoires en thermoplastique, dosseret en mosaïque, évier carré au design actuel et robinetterie inspiré des restaurants. Une salle de bain rayonnante de confort, pensée en fonction de votre bien-être : douche à panneaux de verre coulissants offrant des jets de pluie généreux et bien enveloppants, armoire à pharmacie surmontée d’un miroir et meuble-lavabo flottant. Et pour profiter pleinement des beaux jours d’été, quoi de mieux qu’une terrasse sur le toit pour jouir d’une vue imprenable surle centre-ville, le pont Jacques-Cartier et La Ronde. L'endroit rêvé pour vos petites réceptions ou pour admirer les feux d’artifices
  18. Situé sur la rue De Castelneau à un coin de rue de St-Laurent et à coté du Métro De Castelneau tout près de la Petite-Italie et à l'embouchure sud-ouest du quartier Villeray, ce tout petit projet discret commence sa construction. On parle de condo de luxe d'après l'affiche mais je n'en sais pas plus.
  19. 6605 Hochelaga, coin Langelier. 3 1/2 et 4 1/2 près du métro Langelier. Je trouve que le projet a vraiment un beau design. Malheureusement, les photos sont très petites. Une de ces photos est en + gros dans la revue ''condo direct'' et elle permet de mieux apprécier l'évocation du future design.
  20. This building is exactly the kind of skyscraper I like. It's a good combination of windows and a sleek black material. Dare I say it's almost as good as Mies. And while I'm not a big fan of balconies, these ones blend in!I have to say, I'm very impressed. That said, I am actually starting to get tired of the kind of cookie-cutter condo architecture that is so widespread in Toronto and Vancouver. I think 20 years from now, they will wonder what they were thinking. This is an exception though. Very classy. This is what the Louis-Bohème should have been!
  21. Du Constructeur de Carré SoHo Condo Le VIC Nouveau projet de condos 24 unités sur 3 étages 100% béton http://www.condovic.com/ 11873 Rue Victoria, Pointe-aux-Trembles, QC H1B 2P9
  22. http://montrealgazette.com/news/local-news/good-architecture-pays-french-expert <header class="entry-header" style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: 15px; line-height: 24px; font-family: BentonSans-Regular, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; vertical-align: baseline; color: rgb(0, 0, 0);">The good, the bad and the ugly: French expert assesses Montreal architecture MARIAN SCOTT, MONTREAL GAZETTE More from Marian Scott, Montreal Gazette Published on: April 13, 2016 | Last Updated: April 13, 2016 7:00 AM EDT </header><figure class="align-none wp-caption post-img" id="post-783124media-783124" itemprop="associatedMedia" itemscope="" itemid="http://wpmedia.montrealgazette.com/2016/04/montreal-que-april-6-2016-emmanuel-caille-is-an-edito.jpeg?quality=55&strip=all&w=840&h=630&crop=1" itemtype="http://schema.org/ImageObject" style="margin: 0px 0px 2em; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: inherit; line-height: inherit; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; overflow: hidden; color: rgb(255, 255, 255); float: none;"><figcaption class="wp-caption-text" itemprop="description" style="margin: -1px 0px 0px; padding: 10px; border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: inherit; line-height: inherit; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; zoom: 1; text-align: right; background: rgb(12, 12, 12);"> Emmanuel Calle, editor of the French architecture magazine "d'a", at the Canadian Centre for Architecture. Caille shared his thoughts on Montreal's architecture. MARIE-FRANCE COALLIER </figcaption></figure>SHAREADJUSTCOMMENTPRINT What would an international expert think of Montreal’s recent architecture? To find out, the Montreal Gazette took French architecture critic Emmanuel Caille on a walking tour of downtown and Griffintown. He also visited the $52.6-million indoor soccer stadium that opened last year in the St-Michel district. Caille, the editor of the Paris-based architecture magazine “d’a”, was in town to take part in a panel discussion last week on architectural criticism, organized by the Maison de l’architecture du Québec and the Royal Architectural Institute of Canada (RAIC). Caille’s verdict on our fair city ranged from a thumbs-up for the pricey new soccer stadium to shocked incredulity over a new hotel annex to the Mount Stephen Club, a historic mansion at 1440 Drummond St. <figure id="attachment_783141" class="wp-caption post-img size_this_image_test align-center" itemprop="associatedMedia" itemscope="" itemid="photo url" itemtype="http://schema.org/ImageObject" style="margin: 0px auto 15px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: inherit; line-height: inherit; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; overflow: hidden; color: rgb(255, 255, 255); float: none; max-width: 100%; width: 1000px;"><figcaption class="wp-caption-text wp-caption" style="margin: -1px 0px 0px; padding: 10px; border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: inherit; line-height: inherit; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; zoom: 1; text-align: right; background: rgb(12, 12, 12);"> The Mount Stephen Club. DARIO AYALA / MONTREAL GAZETTE </figcaption></figure>Built from 1880-83 for Lord Mount Stephen, the first president of the Canadian Pacific Railway, it has been in the news recently after suffering structural damage during construction of the annex. Caille, an architect as well as an editor, did not comment on the structural problems, but he did give a visual assessment of the hotel addition, an 11-storey cement-panel structure tucked behind the mansion. “It’s quite brutal in the city,” he said. From de Maisonneuve Blvd., the hotel addition presents a view of three blank walls with a shed-style roof. “It’s astonishing. It’s bizarre,” he said. Caille was also perplexed by the front façade, dotted with small windows of different sizes. “What is not obvious is what relationship there is between this building and the mansion. I don’t see any,” he added. The hotel addition shows why projects should not be conceived in isolation, Caille said. City planners should have put forward a vision for the entire block, which includes an outdoor parking lot on de la Montagne St. that would have made a better site for a high rise, he said. Interesting alleyways and outdoor spaces could have been included, he said. “Everybody is turning their back to one another,” he said of how the different properties on the block don’t relate to each other. At the Ritz-Carlton hotel on Sherbrooke St., Caille said a glass condo addition completed in 2013 is a good example of how to update a historic building for modern use. But he criticized white PVC windows on the hotel’s Sherbrooke St. façade for their thick frames and mullions, which don’t suit the building. “That’s horrible,” he said. “Windows are the eyes of a building. When women use an eye pencil to emphasize their eyes, it changes everything.” <figure id="attachment_783158" class="wp-caption post-img size_this_image_test align-center" itemprop="associatedMedia" itemscope="" itemid="photo url" itemtype="http://schema.org/ImageObject" style="margin: 0px auto 15px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: inherit; line-height: inherit; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; overflow: hidden; color: rgb(255, 255, 255); float: none; max-width: 100%; width: 997px;"><figcaption class="wp-caption-text wp-caption" style="margin: -1px 0px 0px; padding: 10px; border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: inherit; line-height: inherit; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; zoom: 1; text-align: right; background: rgb(12, 12, 12);"> Construction workers work on the District Griffin condo project in Griffintown. DARIO AYALA / MONTREAL GAZETTE </figcaption></figure>In Griffintown, Caille was unimpressed by the banal architecture of condo towers that have sprouted in recent years in the former industrial district, which is undergoing rapid transformation. But the former Dow Planetarium at 1000 St-Jacques St. W. caught his eye. Built in 1966, it closed in 2011. The city turned it over to the Université du Québec’s École de technologie supérieure in 2013. ÉTS announced it would transform the building into a “creativity hub” but so far the building has sat vacant. Caille said the domed landmark has great potential to be recycled for a new vocation. “When a building is dirty and dilapidated, people don’t see its beauty. You have to see the beauty underneath the neglect,” he said. Today there is a consensus that older heritage buildings should be preserved but it’s still difficult to rally public opinion behind buildings from more recent eras, like the 1960s, Caille said. <figure id="attachment_783147" class="wp-caption post-img size_this_image_test align-center" itemprop="associatedMedia" itemscope="" itemid="photo url" itemtype="http://schema.org/ImageObject" style="margin: 0px auto 15px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: inherit; line-height: inherit; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; overflow: hidden; color: rgb(255, 255, 255); float: none; max-width: 100%; width: 1000px;"><figcaption class="wp-caption-text wp-caption" style="margin: -1px 0px 0px; padding: 10px; border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: inherit; line-height: inherit; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; zoom: 1; text-align: right; background: rgb(12, 12, 12);"> The 26-storey Deloitte Tower between Windsor Station and the Bell Centre. DARIO AYALA / MONTREAL GAZETTE </figcaption></figure>The Deloitte Tower, a new 26-storey glass office tower between the Bell Centre and Windsor Station, is nothing to write home about, in Caille’s opinion. “It’s developer architecture,” he said. “There’s nothing interesting about it.” Built by developer Cadillac Fairview, it is part of the $2-billion, nine-tower Quad Windsor project. That includes the 50-storey Tour des Canadiens, which will be Montreal’s tallest condo tower for about a year, until the even taller nearby L’Avenue tower is completed. Most people don’t notice the difference between good and bad architecture when a building is new, Caille said. But over time, the defects of bad buildings grow increasingly obvious, while the good ones become beloved monuments, he said. “People go to New York to see the architecture of the 1920s and 30s,” he said, referring to landmarks like the 1931 Empire State Building and 1928 Chrysler Building. “Good architecture always pays off in the long term.” Unfortunately, much development is driven by short-term considerations, he said. While a developer can walk away from a mediocre building once it’s sold, city-dwellers are stuck with it, he said. “For him, it’s no problem. But for the city, it’s a tragedy,” he said. “Today’s architecture is tomorrow’s heritage,” he noted. Caille is a strong proponent of architectural competitions, which he sees as a way to seek out the best talents and ideas. “It forces people to think and it shows that for every problem, there are many solutions. It’s a way of accessing brainpower,” he said. <figure id="attachment_783196" class="wp-caption post-img size_this_image_test align-center" itemprop="associatedMedia" itemscope="" itemid="photo url" itemtype="http://schema.org/ImageObject" style="margin: 0px auto 15px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: inherit; line-height: inherit; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; overflow: hidden; color: rgb(255, 255, 255); float: none; max-width: 100%; width: 1000px;"><figcaption class="wp-caption-text wp-caption" style="margin: -1px 0px 0px; padding: 10px; border: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; font-size: inherit; line-height: inherit; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; zoom: 1; text-align: right; background: rgb(12, 12, 12);"> Kids arrive at the the new soccer complex at the Complexe environnemental St-Michel. PHIL CARPENTER /MONTREAL GAZETTE </figcaption></figure>The St-Michel soccer stadium has been criticized for its high price tag but Caille hailed it as an example of excellent design. The ecological building designed by Saucier & Perrotte has three glass walls overlooking a park in the St-Michel environmental complex. Caille said the stadium could be a catalyst for improvements in the hardscrabble north-end neighbourhood. During Tuesday’s panel discussion, Paul Goldberger, a Pulitzer Prize-winning former architecture critic for the New York Times and the New Yorker, said that unlike other types of journalists, architectural critics rarely have an immediate impact on public opinion. “Architectural criticism must take a very long view,” he said. “One learns to think of one’s influence as more gradual, as shifting tastes and judgment over time.” Goldberger, author of books including Why Architecture Matters, published in 2009, has written that the critic’s job is not to push for a particular architectural style, but rather to advocate for the best work possible. He said the time in his career when architectural criticism enjoyed greatest prominence was following Sept. 11, 2001, during discussions over the rebuilding of the World Trade Center. “It was a time when architectural criticism really was, I think, front and centre in the public discourse,” he said. “There it was so clear that an issue of architecture was intimately connected to significant world affairs and one did not have to struggle to help people understand the connection between architecture and the rest of the world,” said Goldberger, who now writes for Vanity Fair and teaches at The New School in New York. In a 2011 review of the new World Trade Center for the New Yorker, Goldberger said the design by architect Daniel Libeskind “struck a careful balance between commemorating the lives lost and reestablishing the life of the site itself.” The panel discussion followed the awarding of two $1,000 prizes to young writers for architectural writing on the topic of libraries. The winning entries by Marie-Pier Bourret-Lafleur and Kristen Smith will be published respectively in Argus and Canadian Architect magazines. [email protected] Twitter.com/JMarianScott
  23. For Rent Reason I know why it was his place (not sure if he rented or bought it), he used to be my neighbour. I just wish I still had the pictures of Sophie Durocher place seeing she was my neighbour also.
  24. Builders face financing squeeze 'We can expect a solid demand for condominiums well into the future' TERRENCE BELFORD From Friday's Globe and Mail September 5, 2008 at 12:00 AM EDT Remember how A Tale of Two Cities starts? Charles Dickens writes, "It was the best of times, it was the worst of times." Stretch that theme a bit and you might be describing what is about to happen in the Toronto-area condominium market. First, the best of times. According to Urbanation Inc., which tracks condos from the Burlington border to Ajax and Whitby, there were a record 295 projects for sale at the end of June. Of these, 147 were under construction and another 38 new ones were ready to break ground. Behind those projects stood 151 different developers, and for many of them it was their first shot at building a condo. Those first-timers were mainly house builders who could no longer find building lots. Their choice was either to move into condos or fold their tents. So on the plus side, prospective buyers have never had greater choice. Now on to the worst of times. That impressive number of projects may prove to be the Greater Toronto Area's version of a Potemkin Village by the end of the year. Veteran market watchers say that up to a third of them are likely to be pulled from the market. Along with them, up to 50 developers may bite the dust. The reason? They are unlikely to find financing, says Barry Lyon. He is a 40-year veteran of the Toronto area real estate market. His company, N. Barry Lyon Consulting Ltd., provides research, marketing and project management to the condo and commercial sectors. "The U.S. credit crunch means the money to build just is not there," he says. "The tap has run dry." So, what determines who gets the money to build? In large part, GTA condo buyers. Developers need to presell about 60 per cent of the units in any project before lenders will take a look at providing the money to build. Equally important, they have to do it within reasonable time frames. As their marketing and sales teams scurry to sell suites, construction and carrying costs for high-priced land are ticking upwards. Mr. Lyon says he would not be surprised to see some developers pulling projects out of the market because those costs have risen to such an extent that they simply can't make a buck going ahead. "In some cases, even with 60 per cent sold, some developers are still going to have a hard time finding financing," he says. It is not that there is any lack of demand. It remains strong, says Jane Renwick, executive vice-president of Urbanation. But it is nowhere near the levels seen in 2007, which was a banner year for the industry. Thanks to record sales in 2007, 76 per cent of the 66,310 suites on the market at the end of June had already been snapped up. "I think a lot of last year's sales went to first-time buyers," she says. "I also think that most of them have now been absorbed so we are looking at a return to a more stable market — less of a gold-rush mentality." Again on the plus side of demand is the lure the GTA holds for immigrants. Ms. Renwick points out that of the 150,000 people who immigrate to Ontario in any given year, 100,000 of them make their way to the Toronto area. "If that trend continues, if we continue with high employment and if the economy continues to expand, we can expect a solid demand for condominiums well into the future," she says. That demand will continue to be strongest within the old city of Toronto. That is where 70 per cent of today's projects sit, says Mr. Lyon. It is also where prices are highest — an average $461 a square foot, versus $418 a year ago, according to Urbanation. Compare that with $294 in Scarborough, $254 in Pickering, $287 in Ajax and $313 in Aurora. Much of the difference is simply the cost of land to build on. But in that area Mr. Lyon suggests the coming shakeout may bring positive benefits to buyers. He says the loss of about a third of the developers today jockeying for land and bidding against each other to arrange construction crews likely means less competition for available resources. Less competition means lower demand and lower demand usually leads to, if not lower prices, then at least a much slower rise in prices. "It is going to be an interesting year," Mr. Lyon says. "By the end of 2008, the GTA's condo market may be a quite different place." Terrence Belford is a veteran journalist covering the Toronto real estate market.