Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'code'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Real estate projects
    • Proposals
    • Going up
    • Completed
    • Mass Transit
    • Infrastructures
    • Cultural, entertainment and sport projects
    • Cancelled projects
  • General topics
    • City planning and architecture
    • Economy discussions
    • Technology, video games and gadgets
    • Urban tech
    • General discussions
    • Entertainment, food and culture
    • Current events
    • Off Topic
  • MTLYUL Aviation
    • General discussion
    • Spotting at YUL
  • Here and abroad
    • City of Québec
    • Around the province of Québec.
    • Toronto and the rest of Canada
    • USA
    • Europe
    • Projects elsewhere in the world
  • Photography and videos
    • Urban photography
    • Other pictures
    • Old pictures

Calendars

There are no results to display.

There are no results to display.

Blogs

There are no results to display.

There are no results to display.


Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


About Me


Biography


Location


Interests


Occupation


Type of dwelling

Found 16 results

  1. Apologies if I post in English only. I would need some advice from an architect familiar with the building code applied in Montreal. Indeed I have a bedroom and a bathroom in my condo unit with two skylights and no windows. The skylight in the bedroom could be opened from the room in the past in order to allow some air ventilation. However as the skylight was leaking, it has been sealed from outside and now it cannot be opened anymore. Is there in the building code applied in Quebec a rule that requires a skylight that can be opened if installed in a room without windows? I would like to find a reference to some regulations, if exists, to point out to my condo administrator who was in charge for the reparation that it cannot be done in this way. Merci.
  2. À la suite de pressions du gestionnaire The Ethical Funds, le détaillant compte rendre public le code d'éthique auquel elle soumet ses fournisseurs. Pour en lire plus...
  3. Habitez un lieu unique qui a laissé sa marque dans l’histoire de la région. Tirez tous les plaisirs d’un environnement alliant nature et modernité, situé à quelques pas seulement de la rivière des Mille-Îles et à proximité de tous les services. Construit selon un design architectural contemporain, Horizon 128 est un immeuble en copropriétés proposant 28 condominiums de 1117 pieds carrés et plus (2 chambres) et 2 penthouses (3 chambres et terrasse privée). À partir de 225 000$ plus taxes, incluant 1 espace de stationnement souterrain. UN COMPLEXE DE 28 CONDOMINIUMS OFFRANT DE NOMBREUX AVANTAGES, TELS : - Terrasse commune sur le toit avec aire de détente - 51 espaces de stationnement souterrains - Aménagement paysager avec asphalte et bordures - Finition extérieure de grande qualité : briques, pierres et aluminium - Ascenseur - Casiers privatifs (de type locker) pour chaque unité - Système de ventilation au garage conforme au Code de construction - Espace commun réservé aux déchets et au recyclage - Balcon en béton et garde-corps en verre pour chaque unité CHAQUE UNITÉ BÉNÉFICIE D’UN AMÉNAGEMENT DE HAUTE QUALITÉ, PERSONNALISÉ : - Insonorisation supérieure grâce à une construction sur dalles de béton - Plafond de 9 pieds - Fenêtres hybrides - Finition Haut de gamme - Luminaires - Trois choix de couleurs de peinture par unité Contact : http://www.horizon128.com 514-730-1008 128 Grande-Côte, Saint-Eustache, J7P 1A7
  4. IAIN MARLOW From Friday's Globe and Mail Published Thursday, Dec. 29, 2011 6:40PM EST Last updated Monday, Jan. 02, 2012 12:32PM EST http://www.theglobeandmail.com/report-on-business/rob-magazine/how-a-montreal-company-won-the-race-to-build-the-worlds-cheapest-tablet/article2282337/ Fantastic story! [...] "Datawind’s main office is located in a bland concrete tower block on René-Lévesque Ouest in downtown Montreal. There’s no sign of the company in the building lobby. The only indication of Datawind’s presence is a white sheet of paper taped to an 11th-floor door that reads, “Datawind Net Access Corporation.” Even that had only been posted for the benefit of a visitor. Behind the door, around 50 of the company’s 150 employees—many of them engineers—toil and tinker with motherboards and mobile operating systems. Datawind was founded in 2000 by Suneet and his brother, Raja, who is two years his senior and holds the title of chief technology officer. The pair have had modest success building and selling wireless devices like the PocketSurfer (a small, clamshell mobile device) and the UbiSurfer (a mini-netbook), mainly in the United Kingdom for use on Vodafone Group’s network. The company has an office in London, and another in Amritsar, in the northern Indian state of Punjab, where it operates a call centre and handles some engineering, testing, accounting and HR duties. Although Suneet and his brother are Canadian citizens—born in India, they arrived when they were 12 and 14, respectively—Datawind is registered in the U.K. Suneet says this is largely because of Canada’s notoriously conservative venture capital market, the U.K.’s funding support for innovation and the fact that Canada’s wireless industry—dominated by just three companies—has had little incentive to supplement its own high-margin smartphones with the kinds of inexpensive Internet devices Datawind designs." [...] "Behind the paper sign on the door, and down a hallway lined with overflowing cardboard boxes, Datawind’s Montreal headquarters becomes a dizzying blur of after-hours engineering. It is the kind of scene more common to bootstrapping Silicon Valley start-ups than a decade-old company run by a pair of seasoned entrepreneurs who have already listed two companies on the NASDAQ. Technicians like Cezar Oprescu, a heavy-set Romanian who not only wears two collared shirts but two pairs of glasses at the same time (they double as a microscope), work in rotating shifts, some lasting more than 36 hours, at desks littered with soldering irons, spare computer parts, discarded motherboards and fast food wrappers. Their monitors flicker with the drip of neon green code that looks like something from The Matrix. While one staff member, seated at an impossibly cluttered desk, sets about re-engineering the piece of hardware responsible for receiving WiFi signals, a colleague, stationed just a few feet away, adjusts the software drivers that will interact with it. Elsewhere, programmers are still testing the code that dictates how the touchscreen user interface deals with the drivers. The pace is unrelenting. Not only are employees ordering in dinner, they’re ordering in breakfast, grappling in real time with the allergies and dietary restrictions of an incredibly diverse staff of Eastern Europeans, Indians, Chinese, Russians and French Canadians, several vegetarians and one person who is allergic to green peppers." [...]
  5. I searched MTLURB for any news regarding Ferme Angrignon, but couldn't turn anything up. My apologies if this has been posted elsewhere. I know Ferme Angrignon was shut down in 2008, ostensibly to bring it back up to code, to be reopened in 2010... but while this information was all over the place two years ago, all mentions of Ferme Angrignon's re-opening have been removed on all the official Montreal sites I have checked. The VdeM site unhelpfully states "La Ferme Angrignon est fermée." Has anyone heard any news?
  6. Smart licences now available for border-hopping Quebecers Last Updated: Monday, March 16, 2009 | 6:04 PM ET CBC News New driver's licence will be accepted instead of passport at land crossings. Quebec Premier Jean Charest showed off his "smart" driver's licence near the Canada-U.S. border on Monday as his province became the first in the country to issue the new border-friendly licences. Quebec Premier Jean Charest holds up his new, high-tech driver's licence near the Lacolle border crossing on Monday.Quebec Premier Jean Charest holds up his new, high-tech driver's licence near the Lacolle border crossing on Monday. (CBC) Quebecers who sign up for the enhanced licences will be able to use them instead of their passports at land and water crossings when the U.S. government brings in more strict security measures in June. "It doesn't solve all of the problems, but it goes a long way in making the lives of a number of our citizens simpler," said Charest at a news conference near the Lacolle border crossing south of Montreal. Charest said he wanted to set the example by becoming the first Quebecer to get the new licence, known as PC Plus. He said the licence will be especially handy for people who cross the border often. "Not everybody carries a passport with them everyday of their lives," said the premier. He also hopes the new licences, which are also being developed by states such as New York, will make it easier for Americans to travel to Quebec. "If there are five people, five kids and two parents, if they had to all pay for a passport it would be an expensive requirement for them to come here," said Charest. Charest aware of privacy concerns The new licence contains an electronic chip that when scanned gives border guards a special code. The guard can then punch the code into a computer to search a database for information about the cardholder. The information will include the same details contained on a passport such as address, birth date and name. Charest said the fact the card contains a code, instead of personal details, will help protect the privacy of individuals who sign up for the licence. The database will also be located on the Canadian side of the border. "[Privacy] is a serious issue. We believe we need to do what has to be done to protect the privacy of individuals," said Charest. The card will cost $40 on top of the standard government licence fees. It will be good for four years. A passport will still be required for air travel. Five Canadian provinces including British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan and Ontario are already testing the technology or have licences in development. Saskatchewan has temporarily put its project on hold pending a review of potential privacy issues.
  7. Toronto doit se séparer de l’Ontario Agence QMI Don Crosby 15/03/2010 22h09 Partager À cause des coyottes - Toronto doit se séparer de l’Ontario Les coyotes ont raison de la patience d’un député ontarien, qui estime qu’il est temps que Toronto se sépare…du reste de l’Ontario! © Courtoisie OWEN SOUND - Les coyotes ont raison de la patience d’un député ontarien, qui estime qu’il est temps que Toronto se sépare…du reste de l’Ontario! «La province est totalement administrée avec une mentalité torontoise. Le gouvernement actuel ne peut arriver à rien parce qu’il est dominé par Toronto» estime le député franc-tireur Bill Murdoch, qui représente la circonscription rurale de Bruce-Grey-Owen Sound située au nord-ouest de Toronto. La suggestion a été lancée lors d’une table ronde qui avait lieu samedi à Chepstow entre la Fédération des agriculteurs du comté de Bruce et les politiciens fédéraux, provinciaux et municipaux, au sujet du manque de compréhension de Queen’s Park lorsque venait le temps de traiter de la question des coyotes en milieu rural ontarien. Le député Murdoch veut que le gouvernement élargisse un programme qui verse une prime pour les animaux abattus, alors que les députés de Toronto sont horrifiés à l’idée de tuer des animaux sauvages. «Parlez aux députés de Toronto et vous verrez qu’ils n’ont pas la moindre idée de ce qui se passe ici. La majorité d’entre eux proviennent de la zone du code régional 416.» Le député Murdoch a proposé que la nouvelle province de Toronto soit territorialement limitée au code 416. «Le code régional 905 sera pour l’Ontario. Nous allons encore avoir des villes comme London, Windsor, Ottawa. On pourrait installer la capitale à London.» suggère-t-il. Le député a toutefois reconnu que la ministre de l’Agriculture, Caroll Mitchell, comprenait les préoccupations de l’Ontario rural. Elle a déclaré samedi qu’il était temps d’apporter des modifications à la réglementation concernant le contrôle des coyotes et des autres prédateurs. Les coyotes causent chaque année des dommages au bétail qui sont évalués à des dizaines de milliers de dollars. Certains détracteurs de la politique du gouvernement avertissent que les coyotes sont de plus en plus enhardis et qu’ils sont maintenant visibles dans les zones urbaines.
  8. Come on!! je suis certain que les anti-banlieue vont s'amuser avec celle la Source: Les Affaires Le nombre de banlieusards augmente tellement rapidement autour de Montréal, que le Conseil de la radiodiffusion et des télécommunications canadiennes (CRTC) prévoit une pénurie de numéros portant l'indicatif régional 450 d'ici environ quatre ans. Le conseil a donc créé cette semaine un comité pour étudier les différentes solutions possibles pour éviter un épuisement des numéros. On pourrait ainsi rediviser l'immense zone couverte par le 450 et donner à chaque région son code exclusif. Si ce scénario est retenu, la Rive-Nord et la Rive-Sud pourraient éventuellement avoir une identité téléphonique distincte. L'autre solution consisterait à "superposer" un nouvel indicatif régional au 450. Les abonnés du téléphone se verraient attribuer l'un ou l'autre indicatif, sans égard à leur adresse. Cela se fait déjà sur l'île de Montréal où les codes 514 et 438 cohabitent depuis 2006. Le comité entendra les personnes intéressées cet hiver. D'après le CRTC, l'épuisement prochain du code 450 est principalement attribuable à la croissance démographique rapide des zones qu'il couvre. Entré en vigueur en juin 1998, le 450 aura régné sans partage sur les régions limitrophes de Montréal, soit la Montérégie ainsi qu'une bonne partie des Laurentides et de Lanaudière, de la Haute-Yamaska, du Haut-Richelieu et de l'Estrie pendant moins de 15 ans.
  9. Griffintown est vraiment dans un boom de condos, mais aussi de restaurants de qualités! Puisque beaucoup de membres de ce forum vont déménager ou visiter Griffintown, j'ai décidé de commencer une liste de restaurant dans le quartier. Étant ''foody'' moi-même et ayant été à presque tout les restaurants du coin, j'aimerais partager cette liste puisque certains restos sont très peu connus! Voici une liste de restaurants dans Griffintown (et autour) à essayer! Grinder Le Richmond Code Ambiance Le Boucan Shinji Duo D Nora Gray Cafe Griffintown Arem La Gargote des Antiquaires Bonnys Rufus Rockhead Le Bureau Brasseur de Montreal New City Gas Sushi Taxi Grinder) Restos de tartares et de viandes avec importation de vin privé. Décor incroyable et l'ambiance ni manque jamais! Grinder (rue Notre-Dame) Le Richmond) Italien nouveau-genre avec bonne collection de vin. Restaurant caché sur la rue (déserte) Richmond, mais l'intérieur est superbe avec haut plafond. Le Richmond (rue Richmond) Code Ambiance) Cuisine française moderne avec des ingrédients recherchés de la plus haute qualité. Atmosphère très calme. À visiter pour la qualité des plats et non pour l'ambiance. Code Ambiance (rue Notre-Dame) Le Boucan) Petit resto sympa de viandes fumées (poulets et ribs) style smokehouse. Browny au bacon à essayer! Le Boucan (rue Notre-Dame) Shinji) Nouveau restaurant japonais avec un décor et style incroyable. Shinji (rue Notre-Dame) Duo D) Petit bistro français aucunement prétentieux avec des prix très résonables pour la qualité reçue. Duo D (rue Notre-Dame) Nora Gray) Petit restaurant italien de grande qualité. Réservez d'avance!!! Nora Gray (rue Saint-Jaques) Cafe Griffintown) Jolie petit cafe également ouvert pour le brunch. Il y a souvent de la musique ''live'' en soirée. Cafe Griffintown (rue Notre-Dame) Arem) Nouveau restaurant iranien moléculaire. Absolument unique en son genre, mais incroyablement cher! Arem (rue William) La Gargote) Petit restaurant très traditionel français et très tranquille. (rue Notre-Dame) Bonnys) Restaurant végétarien avec goût et abordable. Bonnys (rue Notre-Dame) Rufus Rockhead) Nouveau bar de Jeff Stinco (Simple Plan). Style et atmosphère avec live DJ tous les soirs. Rufus Rockhead (rue Notre-Dame) Le Bureau) Bar de tapas avec atmosphère détendue. Fromage flambé à essayer! Le Bureau (rue Notre-Dame) Brasseurs de Montreal) Bistro de bières artisanales présentement en ''rénovation''. Brasseurs de Montreal (rue William) New City Gas) Bar et club avec pleins d'évènements de grandes envergures! Pour ceux qui aiment la musique électronique! New City Gas (rue Ottawa) Sushi Taxi) Restaurant de sushi parfait pour takeout! Sushi Taxi (rue Notre-Dame)
  10. December 19th, 2011 Confessions of a Condo Architect By Alanah Heffez // 7 Comments http://spacingmontreal.ca/page/7/ Right after completing her Masters degree in Architecture, Alex got a job with a local firm that designs those condominiums you always see cropping up in the Plateau, Rosemont and Villeray. We have all seen these new constructions and shuddered, or perhaps just sighed it could be worse. The blocks are neither offensive nor inspiring: they're mediocre at best. “We’re creating a generation of condos that are really ugly," Alex says,"It’s as bad as the 'eighties. Frankly, I think it’s going to be worse.” She runs through a list of all-too-familiar features: cramped juliettes where balconies should be; basement apartments with dug-out cours anglaises surrounded with bars that end up looking like jail cells; the use of different tones of brick to break up the façade; the random insertion of incongruous colours to add a semblance of architectural variety... As Alex describes it, designing condos is a constant give and take between respecting the building code while maximizing the client's profits that leaves little space for creativity. Here's an example: the City of Montreal requires 80% of building fronts to be masonry and monotone bricks in taupe matt, grey anthracite and Champlain orange-red are inexpensive (how cheap it feels to reduce the urban landscape to colours in a catalogue). The most an architect can hope to do is to add a splash of coloured plexiglass, and only if the borough's CCU lets it through. Within the envelope, the constraints are event tighter: Alex describes her workdays as "trying to shove too much into a space that’s inherently too small.” She recalls debating with a colleague about the ethics of sketching a double-bed into the plans when a queen simply wouldn't fit in the room. "'If you can’t fit a Queen-sized bed in your apartment, then it’s not an acceptable apartment," Alex insists. But most people don't have much experience reading architectural plans so they don’t necessarily realize what they’re getting. The developer, on the other hand, knows exactly what they want: "they come to you and say: this is the lot, and we want 8 condos in it." That leaves room for only a couple two-bedroom apartments, and the rest bachelors, all within the footprint of what was once a duplex or triplex apartment block. "It’s more profitable to sell more condos than to sell more bedrooms,” Alex points out. There's another catch: buildings under three stories fall within part 9 of the building code, which is more lenient in terms of fire safety regulations. But by sinking in a couple basement suites and adding a mezzanine (which must not exceed a certain percentage of the floorspace), it's possible to squeeze five levels into a building that is officially only three stories high. At least there's a sliver of good news: just this year the city stopped allowing windowless rooms. And while we may be in favour of urban density, tightly-packed residential units are not synonymous with density of inhabitants. "All these properties with great potential are being turned into one single type of real estate that is not family friendly: it’s all geared to young professionals without children. They’re not big enough for a growing family and there’s no flexibility in the space," says Alex. Another thing that she laments is that, with the requirement to transform every square inch of the lot into square-footage of floorspace, there's a tendency to lose the individual entrances, balconies and outdoor staircases that are typical of Montreal's urban landscape, and that create a dialogue between public and private space. Of course, being an architect, she also dwells on the aesthetics: “It’s all going to look very 2010," she sighs, "....and not in a good way.”
  11. Ma minute de défoulage. Pourquoi est-ce la fonction publique est si improductive ? Parfois ça me jette à terre. Je suis comptable. Aujourd'hui, je reçois un état de compte du Centre des Services Partagés du Québec. Je constate qu'il me manque une des factures qui est inscrit sur l'état de compte. Comme il n'y a pas de numéro de télécopieur sur l'état de compte (anyway s'ils ont un télécopieur, il doit être 3 étages plus bas, contrôlé par une série de gardes et de procédures pas possible et surtout probablement verrouillé par un code d'accès dont seul le premier ministre a le code), ni d'adresse courriel (de toute façon ils ne doivent même pas avoir internet au bureau). Je dois donc appeller pour obtenir une simple copie de facture (salaires de gens qui répondent au téléphone inutile). À ma grande surprise, cette fois, je n'ai pas à me battre avec un système de réponse automatisé qui me donne 300 options mais dont aucune ne me convient et encore mieux, je n'ai pas besoin d'attendre ½ heure sur de la musique de centre d'achat pour parler à quelqu'un. La dame me répond, je lui fais ma demande de copie de facture. Après m'avoir écouté, elle me répond: "Parfait, j'envoie le message à Mme XYZ qui va vous rappeler dans 3 à 5 jours ouvrables" !!!! La dame qui répond au numéro de téléphone sur les états de compte ne peut même pas imprimer et ré-envoyer une copie de facture ! En plus, il y a un délai de 3 à 5 jours pour avoir un appel de cette personne (j'espère que je vais être à mon bureau lorsqu'elle appellera, sinon je suis foutu). C'est pathétique tellement c'est improductif.
  12. 2 questions sous un même sujet, pourquoi? et bien, ça ne valait pas la peine d'ouvrir 2 sujets pour juste ça. 1. Pourquoi ferment-ils le Tunnel Ville Marie lors des feux d'artifices à la ronde. Est-ce pour éviter de créer du trafic dans le tunnel lui même? Tout le monde prendrait la sortie St-Laurent-Berri, ils me semble que cette sortie est mieux que De La Montagne pour accueillir un grand flot de véhicule? 2. Quelqu'un connait une liste de code de plaques véhicules, exemple, une plaque avec un F est un véhicule de compagnie, une plaque avec un L est pour un véhicule de livraison, un T pour taxi, A Autobus..... mais j'ai vu une plaque commençant par C hier et je ne me rappel pas avoir vu ça avant. Alors quelqu'un connait un site pour ça?
  13. Confessions of a Condo Architect Halanah Heffez Right after completing her Masters degree in Architecture, Alex got a job with a local firm that designs those condominiums you always see cropping up in the Plateau, Rosemont and Villeray. We have all seen these new constructions and shuddered, or perhaps just sighed it could be worse. The blocks are neither offensive nor inspiring: they're mediocre at best. “We’re creating a generation of condos that are really ugly," Alex says,"It’s as bad as the 'eighties. Frankly, I think it’s going to be worse.” She runs through a list of all-too-familiar features: cramped juliettes where balconies should be; basement apartments with dug-out cours anglaises surrounded with bars that end up looking like jail cells; the use of different tones of brick to break up the façade; the random insertion of incongruous colours to add a semblance of architectural variety... As Alex describes it, designing condos is a constant give and take between respecting the building code while maximizing the client's profits that leaves little space for creativity. Here's an example: the City of Montreal requires 80% of building fronts to be masonry and monotone bricks in taupe matt, grey anthracite and Champlain orange-red are inexpensive (how cheap it feels to reduce the urban landscape to colours in a catalogue). The most an architect can hope to do is to add a splash of coloured plexiglass, and only if the borough's CCU lets it through. Within the envelope, the constraints are event tighter: Alex describes her workdays as "trying to shove too much into a space that’s inherently too small.” She recalls debating with a colleague about the ethics of sketching a double-bed into the plans when a queen simply wouldn't fit in the room. "'If you can’t fit a Queen-sized bed in your apartment, then it’s not an acceptable apartment," Alex insists. But most people don't have much experience reading architectural plans so they don’t necessarily realize what they’re getting. The developer, on the other hand, knows exactly what they want: "they come to you and say: this is the lot, and we want 8 condos in it." That leaves room for only a couple two-bedroom apartments, and the rest bachelors, all within the footprint of what was once a duplex or triplex apartment block. "It’s more profitable to sell more condos than to sell more bedrooms,” Alex points out. There's another catch: buildings under three stories fall within part 9 of the building code, which is more lenient in terms of fire safety regulations. But by sinking in a couple basement suites and adding a mezzanine (which must not exceed a certain percentage of the floorspace), it's possible to squeeze five levels into a building that is officially only three stories high. At least there's a sliver of good news: just this year the city stopped allowing windowless rooms. And while we may be in favour of urban density, tightly-packed residential units are not synonymous with density of inhabitants. "All these properties with great potential are being turned into one single type of real estate that is not family friendly: it’s all geared to young professionals without children. They’re not big enough for a growing family and there’s no flexibility in the space," says Alex. Another thing that she laments is that, with the requirement to transform every square inch of the lot into square-footage of floorspace, there's a tendency to lose the individual entrances, balconies and outdoor staircases that are typical of Montreal's urban landscape, and that create a dialogue between public and private space. Of course, being an architect, she also dwells on the aesthetics: “It’s all going to look very 2010," she sighs, "....and not in a good way.” http://spacingmontreal.ca/2011/12/19/the-architecture-of-mediocrity/
  14. Bonjour tout le monde, Cascades groupe tissus lance sont nouveau concours Transport vert! Vous pourriez gagner une des 15 cartes annuelles de transport en commun ou encore un des 10 vélos Louis Garneau! Pour participer, vous devez entrer le code CUP (code barre de 12 chiffres) d’un produit Cascades groupe tissu, ce code est situé derrière chaque produit. Chaque code entré donne une chance de gagner, vous pouvez aussi augmenter vos chances de gagner en invitant des amis à participer au concours. Une invitation donne une chance supplémentaire de gagner. Pour participer visité le site de Petit Geste Vert Bonne chance! Ps. Saviez-vous que... Si tous les Canadiens utilisaient un seul rouleau de papier hygiénique Cascades Enviro 100% recyclé plutôt qu’un rouleau à base de fibres vierges, nous pourrions sauver 61 000 arbres. Imaginez sur une année! Économie d’arbres par rouleau double de papier hygiénique 0,00194854 arbre Multiplié par 31 612 897 (population canadienne selon le dernier recensement) 61 598 arbres sauvés En plus de sauver des arbres, changer pour un rouleau d’essuie-tout Cascades Enviro 100% recyclé économise 7 litres d’eau, grâce aux procédés de fabrication écologiques de Cascades. Économie d’eau par rouleau d’essuie-tout grâce à la méthode de fabrication écologique de Cascades utilisant 80% moins d’eau que la moyenne de l’industrie.
  15. Au Minnesota, Wal-Mart viole 2millions de fois le Code du travail de cet État américain en privant ses employés de pause ou en ne payant pas des heures supplémentaires de travail. Pour en lire plus...