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Found 4 results

  1. Quebec sees growth in English-speaking population Last Updated: Monday, December 21, 2009 | 9:20 PM ET CBC News The number of English-speaking Quebecers is on the increase for the first time in 30 years due to immigration, along with a slowdown in the outflow of Quebec anglophones. The number has grown by about 5.5 per cent between the censuses of 2001 and 2006, reversing a trend that began in the early 1970s when provincial language policies and a push for Quebec sovereignty prompted many English-speaking residents to move elsewhere. The influx includes people moving from other provinces, as well as an increase in immigration by English-speaking people from south Asian countries. CBC News interviewed several families who have made the move. Steve Clarke and his family moved to Quebec City from Oklahoma and are impressed by the city's safety, its old-world architecture and by what he calls a "benign" government. "When people move to New York City, other people in New York City don't ask them 'why did you move here?' They just understand — you'd move here because it's a great place to live," he said. "But people in Quebec, because it's unusual for people who aren't French as a mother language, I guess it's a curiosity," Clarke said. Carrie-Anne Golding and Ryan Hughes, who moved to Montreal from Vancouver, enjoy the low cost of housing and the city's vibrant, 24-hour lifestyle, but admit cultural change requires some adjustments. "I think the first few months was sort of the honeymoon phase of everything is wonderful," Golding said. "And the reality of, you know, as an anglophone, you are in a minority in comparison." "I thought that we would merge in with the cultures a lot quicker," she said. "But it is a little bit harder. There is definitely some inroads to do in merging in with the French culture." The increase in Quebec's English-speaking population comes as a surprise to Jack Jedwab, a demographer and executive-director of the Association for Canadian Studies. Jedwab is also surprised by how little attention has been paid to the trend by Quebec's English media, compared with 30-year spotlight they focused on the so-called Anglo Exodus. "The community psychology is such that it's very accustomed to this erosion," he said. "It has become part of the [anglophone] community's identity. The shock of that demographic decline, it's impact on our institutional life." Jedwab noted that Quebec's civil service is almost entirely francophone, which can exacerbate the feeling of alienation in the English-speaking community. He suggested it may be time for anglophones to try to build on their increase in numbers, instead of clinging to the old complaint that they're a disappearing breed.
  2. http://www.montrealgazette.com/news/monument+defaced/3012787/story.html Whoever did this should be sent to Guantanamo.
  3. Le holding d'investissement qui siège à Halifax annonce ce matin un remaniement de sa direction qui comprend la nomination de Rob Normandeau comme PDG. Pour en lire plus...
  4. SSJD to move out of Montreal, cites budget woes staff Apr 7, 2008 Citing financial difficulties, the Anglican Sisters of St. John the Divine (SSJD) and the diocese of Montreal have jointly agreed that the Sisters would withdraw from St. John’s House/Maison St-Jean Montréal at St. Lambert, Que., when the lease expires this June, and move back to the SSJD convent in Toronto. “The issues leading to this decision are complex; however, both the diocese and the Sisters would like to see us better able to minister in the diocese without being housed in a large but underused facility,” said Bishop Barry Clarke of Montreal, in a statement issued on behalf of Sr. Elizabeth Ann Eckert, SSJD Reverend Mother. “Over the course of the years, the Government of Quebec added school taxes which had to be paid on the property in addition to the lease, adding a further financial burden to the diocese of Montreal, already struggling to continue to minister faithfully to its people.” Last February, the Sisters celebrated the tenth anniversary of their “ministry of prayer and presence” in the diocese. Bishop Clarke said the diocese and the SSJD are exploring new ways for the sisters to make their ministry available not just to the diocese, but to the whole Ecclesiastical Province of Canada. (The Ecclesiastical Province of Canada includes the dioceses of Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island, Quebec, Montreal,Western Newfoundland, Central Newfoundland and Eastern Newfoundland and Labrador.) “When invited to come, the sisters would like to let others in the diocese know of our availability over a one or two week period and cluster several events together, staying with associates and other friends,” the statement said. “By not having sisters stationed at a house, other sisters would be available to visit and minister and would allow the sisterhood to train more sisters in mission and retreats.” Before operating St. John’s House, the sisters conducted mission work in the parish of St. John the Evangelist in downtown Montreal from 1929 to 1963. The sisters came back in 1998 at the invitation of the diocese and offered a community “committed to being a praying presence.” They preached, taught and led retreats and quiet days. They also participated in ecumenical and inter-faith activities and served on a variety of diocesan committees at the Diocesan Theological College. The SSJD was founded in 1884 by Hannah Grier Coome and is the only order that is entirely Canadian in origin. http://www.anglicanjournal.com/100/article/ssjd-to-move-out-of-montreal-cites-budget-woes/