Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'children'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Real estate projects
    • Proposals
    • Going up
    • Completed
    • Mass Transit
    • Infrastructures
    • Cultural, entertainment and sport projects
    • Cancelled projects
  • General topics
    • City planning and architecture
    • Economy discussions
    • Technology, video games and gadgets
    • Urban tech
    • General discussions
    • Entertainment, food and culture
    • Current events
    • Off Topic
  • MTLYUL Aviation
    • General discussion
    • Spotting at YUL
  • Here and abroad
    • City of Québec
    • Around the province of Québec.
    • Toronto and the rest of Canada
    • USA
    • Europe
    • Projects elsewhere in the world
  • Photography and videos
    • Urban photography
    • Other pictures
    • Old pictures

Calendars

There are no results to display.

There are no results to display.

Blogs

There are no results to display.

There are no results to display.


Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


About Me


Biography


Location


Interests


Occupation


Type of dwelling

Found 20 results

  1. Peu importe où l'on se trouve sur la planète, je pense qu'on pourra toujours se consoler en regardant Détroit..... http://ca.news.yahoo.com/blogs/sideshow/mother-six-trades-98k-house-used-minivan-152424777.html
  2. Read more: http://www.montrealgazette.com/School+crashes+into+building+Penfield/3099570/story.html#ixzz0pfhIUE1k Just another reason why cyclists should be forced to abide by the exact same laws as drivers. What if someone had been killed?
  3. Life in Montreal - Telegraph Mentor Patricia Smith says Canadians are genuinely nice people; friendly and welcoming, fond of the British and very proud of their homeland. Last Updated: 12:01am GMT 28/11/2007 Patricia Smith is willing to answer your questions about Montreal. Our mentors are volunteers and any information they provide is for information only and is not intended to be a substitute for professional advice. Click here to access the message boards terms and conditions. My family moved to Montreal in early 2000 when my husband was offered a job with a Biotech company here. I also worked in the Biotech sector in Montreal for two years but left to start my own relocation company, Home Thoughts. My company is a Destination Services company that specialises in helping Brits who are moving to Montreal to find housing and schools, showing them where to shop, helping them to get drivers licenses, finding them cleaners, doctors, dentists, child-minders etc. Basically, all the things I wish someone had helped me with when I moved here! In addition to my experience of international relocation, having worked here as well, I understand the work ethos, which is very different from that in the UK and in the US. If anyone has any questions about visiting or moving to Montreal I am more than happy to answer them. Ask questions and read the answers on the Mentor Noticeboard. Geography: Montreal is located on an island gently nestled within the St. Lawrence Seaway in Eastern Canada in the Province of Quebec. The city is dominated by a large hill in the centre, grandly called 'The Mountain' by the locals, and only slightly less grandly officially 'Mont Royal'. This beautiful parkland, with the Mansions of Westmount and Outrement cut part way up it, has a chateau at the top and a lookout from which you can see right across to the States. Looking down you can see the business center of Montreal, the McGill University campus buildings and the bridges that cross the St. Lawrence. To the north of Montreal only 45 minutes away are the Laurentian mountains with their superb ski resorts, golf courses, lakes and cottages for summer and winter. To the East an hour away, are the Eastern Townships, again with superb skiing, golf, lakes and holiday cottages. The US is 40 minutes away to the south with Boston and New York six hours drive away and one hour by air. There are several daily flights to London only 7 hours away, and to the rest of Europe. Cuisine: The French influence means that the food is great; the croissants and pastries are second only to France. It appears that everyone who has ever emigrated here also loves food because there are restaurants of every nationality serving good food to suit every budget. Eating out here is so cheap compared to the UK, the portions are large, the service is great and children are welcome everywhere. There is a lot more smoking here than in the UK so ask for a non-smoking table if that is your preference. Wine and spirits are very expensive as they are sold by a Quebec government agency, the SAQ. The wine sold in the supermarkets is more like Ribena. Beer is more reasonably priced and can be bought in supermarkets or corner shops called depanneurs. People: Canadians are genuinely nice people; friendly and welcoming, fond of the British and very proud of their homeland. It has been said that Canada is a bit boring, but this is really not the case in Quebec. The European influence, particularly that of the French, really livens things up. After Paris, Montreal is the second largest French-speaking city in the world. 69% of its three million people speak French as their mother tongue, 12% speak English and 19% don't speak either. The reality of the situation, however, is that in this tolerant, vibrant, and youthful city most of its inhabitants are functionally bilingual, often trilingual, and so coming here only speaking English is not a problem. Even if you speak perfect French you will be spotted as a visitor as the Quebecois accent is very different. I have lived here for four years and people still start speaking in English to me the minute I say 'Bonjour'. Montrealers love Brits and the shop assistants always want to chat, telling you who in their family is British, and how much they love your accent. There are also large numbers of immigrants from non-English or French cultures and there is no obvious racial tension. I suspect this is because they are not perceived scroungers or benefit seekers but just as new additions to a long line of immigrants, who are here to work hard, learn French and get on with life. Weather: Montreal has four distinct seasons. Winter is long lasting from November until the end of March. It has usually snowed by the middle of December and carries on intermittently until March. January and February are the coldest months with temperatures averaging -10ºC but on the odd day it does fall to -40ºC with the wind chill factor. -10ºC sounds cold but it isn't really provided you have the right clothes. It is a dry cold and so it doesn't penetrate through to your bones as it does in the UK. The children love the snow, which is dry and brushes off easily, and you can always appreciate the beautifully clear blue skies. Spring is very short lasting from April to the end of May, but everything grows extremely quickly and it is delightful to see the grass and flowers pushing through past the residual snow. Summer runs luxuriously through June to September and is hot and often humid. The temperature can reach the mid 30's in July and August and it is truly fantastic. Fall (Autumn) runs from October until mid-November and is beautiful with red, brown and gold colours abounding. It is a great time to travel to Vermont and the Laurentians or anywhere woody and rural. Standard of Living: Everything in Montreal is roughly half the price of that in the UK, from food and clothes to restaurants and housing, and people are not embarrassed to question prices or complain about bad service. Salaries are lower than in the UK but despite this you will still have a much better standard of living in Montreal. Healthcare: The medical system, Medicare, is very similar to the NHS with the same sorts of advantages and disadvantages. Treatment is free on demand and the doctors and nurses are generally very good but the waiting lists are often long. GP's are in short supply and you have to wait for hours in the Emergency Room (casualty). Once you arrive on a work permit or land as an immigrant you need to obtain a Medicare card to get treatment. The private health system in Quebec is very limited. You cannot pay to see a consultant or have tests performed in a public hospital more quickly but you can go to a private clinic for certain tests, particularly if you are an adult. Many health insurance schemes will pay for this. The cost of prescription medicines is borne by the patient or by the private insurance that you will have through your employer. Dental care is high quality but very expensive and not covered at all by Medicare for adults and even for children the provision is limited. Employee insurance schemes cover dental treatment but cover varies from scheme to scheme. As in the UK, adults in Quebec pay for eye check ups and children and those on welfare benefits do not. Medicare does not cover the cost of glasses or contact lenses, however, most insurance schemes cover the costs in part or completely. Glasses and contact lenses are considerably cheaper in Quebec than in the UK. Driving: If you hold a valid British Driving License you can obtain a Quebec license without taking a test. You can drive for a few months on your international license but it is best to get a Quebec license as soon as possible. You can obtain this from the SAAQ (Société de l'Assurance Automobile du Quebec). You are legally required to carry your license with you when driving as well as the insurance and registration documents for the car. The rules regarding drink-driving, the wearing of seat belts, and use of child car seats are similar to those in the UK, i.e do not drink and drive, wear seats belts at all times and make sure your child has the correct car seat for their size and age. It is relatively easy to adjust to driving on the right hand side of the road in Quebec, because the speed limits are lower than in the UK and they are, by and large, obeyed. The general consensus among expats is that drivers in Quebec are not very good. It is not that they are deliberately obstructive or aggressive; they just seem unaware of other cars, not letting you into a lane or out of a side street, pulling out suddenly and rarely indicating. There is 'no fault' insurance in Quebec. That is, if you have an accident your insurance company pays for your damage and the other parties company pays for their damage regardless of who was responsible. Any injury to your person is insured by the SAAQ. Banking: If you are just visiting banking is fine, you can use your UK cashpoint cards in the ATM's which are everywhere, not just in the banks but in cinemas, depanneurs and supermarkets. Of course, UK credit cards are accepted everywhere. The banks are open 10am until 4pm on weekdays only and have very long queues so use the ATM whenever possible. If you are planning to move here for a few years banking is more difficult. Your credit reference in the UK is no good here at all and you basically start from scratch proving your financial worthiness to be given a credit card and overdraft facility. Getting as many store cards as possible is one way to improve your credit rating.
  4. tres tres triste. Je gage de voir 3 ou 4 personnes commencer a insulter Villeneuve Former Formula 1 champion Jacques Villeneuve said he left Quebec because of the province’s language laws, business climate and the general “morose ambiance.” In an exclusive interview with QMI Agency, Villeneuve, who works as an F1 analyst on French and Italian television, said he “no longer felt at home” in Quebec. He recently sold his luxurious home in one of Montreal’s wealthiest neighbourhoods and is now living in Andorra, a microstate that is known as a tax haven, located in the Pyreneese mountains between France and Spain. “My leaving had nothing to do with taxes,” Villeneuve said. Rather, he said he didn’t appreciate Quebec’s “evolution,” which he said reminded him of France. “Everything bad about France was transferred to Quebec,” he said. “The social ills, the student protests ... The climate is such that people hesitate before investing in Quebec.” He blamed government regulations for scaring off investors, and said he didn’t want his three children to live in the “morose ambiance” in Quebec that “blocks its future.” In particular, Villeneuve targeted the province’s language laws, which legislate the use of the French language. He said it’s up to parents to teach their children how to speak French. The former F-1 driver will be in Montreal in two weeks for the Canadian Grand Prix where he’ll likely draw criticism for his recent remarks on Quebec. Villeneuve also received the wrath from student movement leaders last spring when he invited striking students to “stop protesting and go back to school.”
  5. Finance guys all have Montreal roots Despite similar backgrounds, paths never crossed Elizabeth Thompson, Gazette Ottawa Bureau Published: 5 hours ago OTTAWA - They grew up only a few miles apart, when Montreal reigned as Canada's financial centre. All are products of English Montreal schools, born within five years of each other. They had newspaper routes - two hauling The Gazette; the third the Montreal Star. All three have sons. In all cases, their mothers have survived their fathers. All saw major changes to their careers at about the same time, in 1994-95. Before they were handed the finance portfolio by their respective parties, Conservative Jim Flaherty, Liberal John McCallum and New Democrat Thomas Mulcair's paths had never crossed. Now, as MPs prepare to deal with the mini-budget Flaherty is to deliver Tuesday, the paths of the three Montreal anglos will cross often. If you include Bloc Quebecois finance critic Paul Crete, who hails from Herouxville, all four MPs tasked with the finance portfolio grew up in Quebec. Typical of Montreal's anglo community, two of them - Flaherty and McCallum - headed down the 401 for better opportunities and now represent ridings in the Toronto area. However, all three say the experience of growing up as English Montrealers still influences how they approach life - and finance. Born Dec. 30, 1949, the finance minister is the oldest. Sixth of eight children in an Irish Catholic family, Flaherty grew up in a modest house on Broadway Ave. in Lachine. "I look at what my own kids expect today, their own rooms and so on," the father laughed of three sons. "We dreamed about that kind of thing." It was also in that neighbourhood the man who is now responsible for raising revenue for the government had his first job, delivering copies of the Star. "I had to go out and collect from people." After elementary school, Flaherty went to Loyola High School. While there, his family moved to N.D.G. in a house where his mother still lives. A hockey scholarship took him to Princeton University at age 16 in the mid-1960s. From there he did his law degree at Osgoode Hall in Toronto. Flaherty said his upbringing in Montreal and his years at Loyola are reflected in some of the measures he has introduced, such as his ground-breaking registered disability savings plan. "Those are part of the values that I grew up with. That you look to see if there is uneveness and try to level the playing field. Not to make everyone the same but to make sure everyone has equal opportunity. I think that comes from growing up in Montreal." Watching Canada's financial centre shift from Montreal to Toronto also influenced Flaherty. "We grew up thinking of Montreal as a financial centre. Of course, later Toronto grew as a financial centre and now Calgary. So it teaches me the dynamism of the movement of capital." Studying the movement of capital is what took McCallum to Toronto when he left his job as a professor at McGill University in 1994 to become chief economist for the Royal Bank. Born April 9, 1950, one of four children, McCallum's upbringing was perhaps the most privileged. He was raised in Pointe Claire, Senneville (where he delivered The Gazette) and then Westmount, where he attended Selwyn House. From 14 to 18, McCallum boarded at Trinity College School in Port Hope, Ont., then studied in Cambridge and Paris before returning to do a PhD at McGill. He worked in Manitoba and British Columbia from 1974 to 1982 before teaching at the Universite du Quebec a Montreal, then McGill. McCallum said his time at UQAM had a lasting effect. "That experience of being at UQAM, which is not only French but kind of sovereignist, influenced my thinking quite a lot about Quebec, about Quebec and Canada. Being an anglo Montrealer but also being immersed in the franco world has influenced my thinking quite a bit." While McCallum has never met Mulcair, he knows a number of the people Mulcair worked with at Alliance Quebec. His three sons are about the same age as Mulcair's two, and both men worked for the Manitoba government - Mulcair only a few years after McCallum. Born Oct. 24, 1954, Mulcair is the youngest, and the newest arrival to Parliament, elected in last month's Outremont by-election. The offspring of an Irish-Canadian father and a French- Canadian mother, Mulcair, like Flaherty, grew up in a large family of 10 children where he had to learn to fend for himself. Like Flaherty, one of his first jobs was a paper route. "That's how I had spending money through high school and into CEGEP. I had a really big route. I had over 100 Gazettes on Saturday." His years at Laval Catholic High School "probably gave me a little bit better preparation for the rough and tumble," he says. Mulcair, who studied law at McGill, took the leap into politics in 1994, only a few months before Flaherty did, getting elected as a Liberal to the National Assembly. Like Flaherty, he went on to serve in cabinet. Like his counterparts, Mulcair says his background as an anglophone Montrealer will play a role in how he approaches his new job as NDP finance critic. "It gives me a lot of sensitivity to the priorities of Quebecers." [email protected]
  6. Ancient Scottish capital city to receive explosion of colour in Children's Hospital Locally regarded as Sick Kids, Edinburgh's historic Royal Hospital for Sick Children is to be relocated to a colourful new building designed by Nightingale Associates. Branching into a new location, this will be only the second of Nightingale's projects in Scotland, following a successful bid for Dumfries Royal Infirmary earlier this year. Edinburgh is a notoriously difficult city for modern architecture. The Scottish Parliament building, designed by Spanish architect, the late Enric Miralles, sits at the foot of the Edinburgh's Royal Mile despite intense disapproval from many residents from the design stage. But while the new design for the Sick Kids features an impactful, brightly coloured facade, resistance is less likely as the project will move services from the existing city centre hospital to the outskirts of the city adjacent to the new Royal Infirmary of Edinburgh. The £150m design for NHS Lothian was won through the new Frameworks Scotland scheme. It will provide 30,000sqm of space containing children and young people’s A&E, day case and inpatient areas; an imaging department; outpatients unit; therapy suite: theatre suite; a critical care unit; Child and Adolescent Mental Health day case and inpatient unit; as well as a child and family hotel. There will also be facilities for rehabilitation, education and staff administration. Kieren Morgan, Health Development Director, said: "Nightingale Associates was awarded the contract based on, amongst other things, the innovation displayed in its design, which used new concepts such as ‘cruciform wards’, Sense Sensitive Design and the much-discussed single-bed wards. The practice was able to draw on its pervious similar experience on the Design for Life NHS framework in Wales, through which it was selected to design the first ever 100% single-room hospitals to be built in the UK." He continued: "It is extremely important that the design of this building reflects the significance of the project, and that we therefore use and build on our pioneering research completed for the Welsh Designed for Life 'pathfinder' hospitals to ensure that this building is regarded as a benchmark in healthcare design.” Niki May Young News Editor http://www.worldarchitecturenews.com/index.php?fuseaction=wanappln.projectview&upload_id=11452
  7. Lead team of international researchers. MONTREAL - An international team of researchers led by scientists from the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital at McGill University have discovered the origins of a rare neurological disease known as ARSACS first appears in children and exists almost exclusively in Quebec. The discovery, published in this week’s issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America and singled out for special mention by the American Society for Cell Biology, revealed the disease is linked to a defect in the function of mitochondria, the energy-producing power plants of cells, which gives it a link to more common neurological diseases like Parkinson’s and ALS. This brings hope the extensive research done on those diseases will advance treatment of the rare disorder and further research in the more common diseases. “We think that by studying this disease we will not only bring treatment to those patients, but may also help to better understand how other neuro-degenerative diseases like Parkinson’s – and to a lesser degree, Alzheimer’s – function,” said Dr. Bernard Brais of the Neuro. Autosomal Recessive Spastic Ataxi of Charlevoix-Saguenay is so named because it was diagnosed among descendants of roughly 10,000 French settlers who emigrated to that region of New France. It was first recognized as a separate neurological disease in 1979. Victims show symptoms between the ages of 2 and 6 years old that include trouble walking and clumsiness. By their early 40s, sufferers must use wheelchairs and have trouble speaking. Most die in their 50s. The disease affects about 300 people in Quebec, and another 100 worldwide. In 2000, the gene that was mutated in patients was identified. All genes make proteins that carry out a certain function, but scientists didn’t know what the mutated proteins did. This year, a team of 30 scientists working at nine laboratories worldwide finally discovered that the mitochondria in neurons (cells that carry nerve impulses), particularly those found in the brain, were mutated and would shut down, leading to neurological degeneration. “You can’t even imagine what to do in terms of therapy until you know at the cellular level what’s going on,” said Dr. Peter McPherson of the Neuro. Scientists can now try different medications and chemical treatments to slow or cure the disease. Most importantly, because links were found to diseases like Parkinson’s and ALS that are also affected by mitochondrial defects, the multitude of research on those diseases, and the treatments used, can be applied to ARSACS. “For us, it definitely gives hope,” said Sonia Gobeil and Jean Groleau, whose two children were diagnosed in 2006. The Montreal couple have raised more than $2 million for research. Their children, now 6 and 8, are still fine but “we know where its going,” Gobeil said. Anything that can help to slow or cure the disease is key, the couple said. This week’s announcement was a huge step. Read more: http://www.montrealgazette.com/news/Montreal+scientists+discover+origins+rare+neurological+disease/6005135/story.html#ixzz1jkNPkYI5
  8. A quick word for English Language dispute. Quebec parents challenge French Language Charter ELIZABETH THOMPSON, The Gazette Published: 6 hours ago Quebec parents challenging the constitutionality of a Quebec law that blocks some children who attend English private schools from transferring into English public schools will get their day before Canada's top court in December. The Supreme Court of Canada has set aside Dec. 15 to hear two cases that pit the Canadian Charter of Rights against Bill 104, leading some to hope that a final decision in the dispute could now be rendered in time for the start of the 2009 school year. "It appears the court is doing everything it can to hear the case as quickly as possible," said Brent Tyler, lawyer for the parents. The cases centre on Bill 104, adopted by the Parti Québécois government in 2002. Prior to Bill 104, children who were otherwise ineligible to attend English school under the terms of the French Language Charter, Bill 101, could become eligible to attend English public schools after spending at least a year in an unsubsidized English-language private school. Attending English school under a special authorization, such as for a temporary work permit or for humanitarian reasons, could also make a child and their siblings eligible for English education. At the heart of the case is the issue of which takes precedence - the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, which provides that children who have attended English schools, and their siblings, have the right to attend English schools in Quebec, or Quebec's language charter. Although the parents in both cases lost at the lower court level, they won at the Quebec Court of Appeal which struck down Bill 104, saying the law was inconsistent with the Canadian Charter of Rights. Tyler said the parents got more good news recently when they learned that the federal court challenges program, which was cut then partially restored by the Conservative government, has agreed to provide $70,000 in funding to fight the two cases before the Supreme Court. Tyler says the outcome of the cases could have a significant impact on English schools in Quebec - particularly in the Montreal area. Tyler said there has been a steady stream of English school closures in the Montreal area since Bill 104 was introduced and the phenomenon is more pronounced in areas of town that had been receiving students who became eligible for education in English school by attending a private school. The English Montreal School Board has estimated it has lost about 450 students a year since Bill 104 was adopted. The stakes are high for many private schools as well, said Tyler. Many English private schools in Montreal accept government money at the high school level, but not at the primary level, meaning they can accept students ineligible under Bill 101 in elementary school but not in high school. "On average, 30 per cent of the children enrolled in the primary programs of these schools now will not be able to continue in the same schools if Bill 104 is upheld by the Supreme Court," said Tyler. The challenge to Bill 104 is just one of several cases the Supreme Court is scheduled to hear this fall - many of them from Quebec. The first case to be heard, on Oct. 7, will be a challenge by a group of Hutterites to an Alberta law obliging everyone to have their photo on their driver's licences. The Hutterites argue the law violates their religious freedom because their religion believes that the second commandment prohibits them from having their photograph taken willingly. [email protected]
  9. mtlurb

    Montreal Haunts

    Montreal Haunts Kathleen Murphy Issue date: 10/30/07 Section: halloween edition Behind every great city there lies at least one chilling ghost story and Montreal is no exception. The Old Port is believed to be the most haunted part of the city. Before it was converted to a restaurant, Le Saint Gabriel was the oldest inn in Montreal and was said to be haunted by the ghost of a young girl who died there in a fire during the 19th century. The Old Port is also the home of Marie-Reine Besnard, the witch of Hotel Dieu, and the infamous lovers Claude Thibault and Marie-Josèphe Angélique, who were allegedly responsible for the fire that destroyed most of the Old Port in 1734. Marie-Josèphe-Angélique was found guilty and gruesomely executed, but Claude Thibault disappeared and was never seen again. London may be famous for Jack the Ripper, but at least all of Jack the Ripper's victims remained dead. This was not the case for victim and prostitute Mary Gallagher. In 1879 she was beheaded by her best friend and fellow prostitute Susan Kennedy. Rumour has it that a downstairs neighbour heard Gallagher's body fall, followed by the sound of an axe chopping for ten whole minutes. Every seven years, Gallagher returns to haunt the streets of Griffintown where she died. Ghosts are still being sighted in Montreal to this day. Le Spectre Montreal is a team of ghost hunters who will help anyone "troubled by paranormal phenomenon" free of charge. If they can't resolve the problem, they recommend people, such as mediums, who can. In November 2001, Le Spectre investigated an old Bed and Breakfast that was haunted by the spirits of previous owners who committed suicide in the building. Images of these spirits can be seen in pictures taken inside the house. Another Le Spectre project took place in June 2002, when a family with two young children moved into a house in the south shore. While playing in the ruins of an old house, the children came across the battered corpse of an old man. The victim had lost a lot of blood and one of his legs had been pulled from his body. The children ran screaming to their parents but when they returned to the house, the body was gone. In June 2001, in St. Joseph (on the north shore), a man took a wedding picture in a gazebo outside the house where he was having his reception. Behind his head in the picture is the image of a small baby's face. Upon asking the owners, the man discovered that 25 years ago a baby girl named Alison Campbell died by drowning in a pond that used to lie under the gazebo. If you are interested in learning more about the ghosts that lurk in Montreal there is a ghost tour that takes place in Old Port. Tours end in September but they have special tours over Halloween
  10. Une des forces de Montréal est sa diversité. Et une des raisons pourquoi j'adore cette ville est bien évidemment la diversité que l'on peut décliner de plusieurs façons différentes. La diversité s'exprime par une diversité de climats/saisons, une diversité de restaurants/gastronomies etc. Mais une facette de la diversité de Montréal est son coté multiethnique, religieuse et/ou linguistique. En voici un bel exemple dans cet article provenant du New jersey et faisant part du dynamisme de la communauté juive qui s'exprime dans les nombreux commerces, lieux de cultes et quartiers ayant une forte concentration de gens de cette communauté. http://www.jewishlinknj.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=8716:vacationing-in-montreal&catid=165:travel&Itemid=577 Merci à Montréal city weblog pour avoir posté cet article. C'est là que je l'ai vu et j'en profite pour le partager avec la communauté de mtlurb.com
  11. Skip GST cut, use cash to fight child poverty: report The Canadian Press November 26, 2007 at 12:19 PM EST OTTAWA — A social action group is calling on the federal government to cancel the next one-percentage-point cut to the GST and divert the money toward efforts to eliminate child poverty. In releasing its annual report Monday, Campaign 2000 said the level of child poverty in Canada has not improved since 1989, despite repeated promises by governments to tackle the issue. “Eighteen years after the 1989 all-party resolution of the House of Commons, the child poverty rate is exactly the same,” said the report, which received endorsements from all three federal opposition parties. “Some important initiatives in child benefits, early-learning and child-care services and affordable housing were started. Some of these have been stalled and others have been rescinded. Related Articles Proportion of poor families skyrocketing in Toronto, report says The Globe and Mail “It is time for Canada to adopt a poverty-reduction strategy that will honour the commitments to children and their families.” The group says 788,000 children — 11.7 per cent of children in Canada — live in poverty, despite a growing economy, a soaring dollar and low unemployment. Government undertakings have lacked specific targets, timetables and other specifics, undermining political will to take effective action, the group said. The Conservative government has opted to cut the GST and implement billions of dollars in corporate tax cuts while Canada has failed to honour numerous commitments to children: — the unanimous, all-party resolution in the House of Commons, calling for an end to child poverty by 2000. — the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child ratified by Parliament and all provinces by 1999, recognizing an adequate standard of living for children. — the Early Learning and Child Care Agreements signed by the federal government and all provinces in 2005 that laid the foundation for a universally accessible system. — an agreement among first ministers and First Nations leaders in Kelowna in 2005 that promised to improve quality of life for First Nations, Métis and Inuit children and their families. Quebec is the only province where child poverty rates have been consistently declining since 1997, the report said, partly because of a package of family-support benefits implemented in 1997. Despite the province's booming economy, Alberta's child-poverty rate has fluctuated between 14 and 15 per cent since 1999, the group says. British Columbia remains the province with the highest child-poverty rate, at 23.5 per cent. “There are too many working-poor families in B.C. who are unable to get jobs with sufficient pay, hours and benefits to lift them above the poverty line,” the report says. Indeed, the group says jobs are not always the answer — 41 per cent of impoverished children in Canada live in families where at least one parent works full-time all year. “More parents are working, but they're still poor,” the report says, calling for increases to the minimum wage. “Full-time work at minimum wage is not an escape from poverty. “The economy is growing, but prosperity doesn't benefit everyone equally.” Child care is a critical element of poverty reduction, it says, and notes that affordable housing leaves more money for food, clothing, school supplies and transportation. And the group says the risk of living in poverty is higher in First Nations and recent-immigrant communities.
  12. Barack Obama faces 30 death threats a day, stretching US Secret Service US President Barack Obama is the target of more than 30 potential death threats a day and is being protected by an increasingly over-stretched and under-resourced Secret Service, according to a new book. By Toby Harnden in Washington Published: 8:34PM BST 03 Aug 2009 Since Mr Obama took office, the rate of threats against the president has increased 400 per cent from the 3,000 a year or so under President George W. Bush, according to Ronald Kessler, author of In the President's Secret Service. Some threats to Mr Obama, whose Secret Service codename is Renegade, have been publicised, including an alleged plot by white supremacists in Tennessee late last year to rob a gun store, shoot 88 black people, decapitate another 14 and then assassinate the first black president in American history. Most however, are kept under wraps because the Secret Service fears that revealing details of them would only increase the number of copycat attempts. Although most threats are not credible, each one has to be investigated meticulously. According to the book, intelligence officials received information that people associated with the Somalia-based Islamist group al-Shabaab might try to disrupt Mr Obama's inauguration in January, when the Secret Service co-ordinated at least 40,000 agents and officers from some 94 police, military and security agencies. More than a dozen counter-sniper teams were stationed along the inauguration parade route and the criminal records of employees and hotel guests in nearby buildings were scrutinised. Despite all this, there were glaring loopholes in the security. Kessler describes how more than 100 VIPs and major campaign donors were screened by metal detectors but then walked along a public pavement before boarding "secure" buses and were not checked again. It could have been relatively simple for an assassin to have mingled with them in order to get close enough to shoot the new president. After Mr Obama was elected president, his two children Malia, 11, codenamed Radiance, and Sasha, eight, codenamed Rosebud, began receiving Secret Service protection. Mr Obama's wife Michelle is codenamed Renaissance. The Secret Service also started to protect Vice-President Joe Biden's children, grandchildren, and mother. Instead of bringing in more agents - instantly identifiable because of their bulky suits, worn over bullet-proof jackets, and earpieces - the Secret Service directed agents to work longer hours to cover the extra load and to miss firearms training, physical fitness sessions and tests. "We have half the number of agents we need, but requests for more agents have fallen on deaf ears at headquarters," a Secret Service agent told Kessler. "Headquarters' mentality has always been, 'You can complete the mission with what you have. You're a U.S.S.S. agent'." Mr Biden's constant travel, including back to his home state of Delaware-the burden has meant that all agents on his team have ceased training. According to Kessler, however, they fill in forms stating they have "taken and passed all tests, when they have not, creating a dishonest culture". The Secret Service has increasingly cut corners after it was absorbed by the new Homeland Security Department under Mr Bush. Kessler said that when Mr Biden threw the first pitch at the first Baltimore Orioles game of the 2009 season, the Secret Service did not screen any of the more than 40,000 fans, stunning his agents and the local Secret Service field office.
  13. Anglos key to Quebec, Weil says New justice minister discusses her political debut, her views on Quebec society and the language issue - and her other job as a hockey mom By KEVIN DOUGHERTY, The GazetteFebruary 22, 2009 12:01 Kathleen Weil, Quebec's justice minister and MNA for N.D.G., in Old Montreal this month.Kathleen Weil sees language and diversity not as irritants but as lubricants, changing the face of Quebec. "It's French here, but with a thriving English community," Weil said in her first interview with The Gazette since her political debut in the Dec. 8 provincial election. Premier Jean Charest named Weil - who pronounces her name "While" in English but "Vial" in French - as justice minister after she held the Liberal stronghold of Notre Dame de Grâce. She sees N.D.G. as a microcosm of Quebec's future, with people from English, French and other backgrounds who increasingly speak French. Michael Goldbloom, a founding member of Alliance Quebec and principal of Bishop's University, says he and Weil have been close friends since the 1980s, when she was the English-rights lobby group's legal adviser. He recently saw the justice minister and her husband, Michael Novak, when their daughter Elisabeth, 13, played in a hockey game in Bromptonville. "She really is a hockey mum," Goldbloom said. Family values and empathy motivate her, Goldbloom added. Working with Batshaw Youth & Family Services and Quebec's regional health boards, Weil established links in Montreal and across the province. "You've got to be connected," Goldbloom said, adding that her shift to politics was "a perfectly logical step." Paul Jones, who was with Alliance Quebec, as he puts it, "from its inception to its decline," remembers Weil as "very pleasant" and "very intelligent." And Jones observes that the two solitudes that once defined Quebec society are now blurred. Weil sees Quebec's English community is a " tremendous asset," plugged in to Quebec. "If it didn't exist, you would have to invent it, because Quebec is stronger because of the English community. "My best close friends are francophones," she said, adding that the shifting demographics of Montreal mean the city will be quite different in 10 years, in 20 years, with more anglophones and newcomers at ease in French. "When I was campaigning in N.D.G., I was amazed," Weil said. "I was amazed at the anglophones, how bilingual they were." Going door to door, she would greet voters in French and in English. "Anglophones would sometimes continue in French," she said. "I was meeting Chinese people, where the dad didn't speak English or French, but the child spoke fluent French." But Weil recognizes that the government has to be sensitive to English-speaking seniors and others who are not at ease in French and who have a legal right to services in English. Quoting former PQ premier Lucien Bouchard, she said: "When you are sick, it is not the time to take a language course." Running in December was Weil's first venture into partisan politics, but she said she is "very comfortable" with the Quebec Liberals. "I've always been a Liberal in my heart," she said, recalling that her mother, Mary, was an active Liberal. "I believe in their values of social justice. I believe in supporting the private sector to create jobs to better share the wealth, which is one of the fundamental principles of the Liberal Party." Weil inherited her social conscience from her parents. Her father, Dr. Paul Weil, ran the blood transfusion service at the Royal Victoria Hospital. He wrote medical research papers, but the dinner table conversation was about history and socioeconomic issues. "He cared about people who did not have advantages." Her mother worked full time in public relations at the hospital and corresponded with Dr. Norman Bethune when he was in China. Her mother, from Almonte, Ont., decided she should be schooled in French. Weil, the sixth of seven children, recalls that her father, originally from the United States, would take the younger children on house calls in the southwestern part of the city. And Verdun is where she takes her daughter Elisabeth to pre-dawn hockey games. Weil admits to being a "hockey mum," but rejects the comparison with Alaska Governor Sarah Palin. Aside from impromptu runs, when she can find the time, Weil, 54, says her daughter's hockey games are important, to maintain contact with the youngest of her four children, but also to meet other parents. "Some lose their jobs and they are stuck," she said. As justice minister, Weil aims to improve access to justice, using mediation to cut legal costs and save time. She wants to reintroduce the anti-SLAPP law - to stop Strategic Lawsuits Against Public Participation - which died on the order paper when the election was called. As justice minister and attorney-general, she is the government's lawyer in court cases. She also follows trials in progress and bills under consideration. "You're the legal counsel for the government on all laws," she said. She is not, however, allowed to comment on cases before the courts. "The Gazette may get frustrated because probably I will be the quietest minister of all, and I have to be," Weil said. "If a minister of justice is not above the fray, that's when people lose confidence in their justice system." [email protected] thegazette.canwest.com © Copyright © The Montreal Gazette
  14. Immigrants' children more likely to graduate from university Statistics Canada's new study. Close-knit South American family has played major role in her success, student says SHANNON PROUDFOOT, Canwest News Service Published: 8 hours ago The odds of celebrating a university graduation vary widely for young adults in Canada, largely depending on where their parents were born, according to a new study from Statistics Canada. The children of immigrants are more likely to toss a graduation cap in the air than their peers with Canadian-born parents. However, the children of Chinese immigrants are almost three times more likely to graduate from university than those of Latin American immigrants, the report finds, at 70 per cent compared to 24 per cent. By comparison, about 28 per cent of the children of Canadian-born parents get university degrees. Children of Indian parents and those from other Asian countries and Africa have graduation rates above 50 per cent, while about 25 per cent of children with parents from European countries like Germany, Portugal and the Netherlands get degrees. "The children of almost all immigrant groups have either similar or higher university completion rates than the children of Canadian-born parents," says Teresa Abada, an assistant professor of sociology at the University of Western Ontario who conducted the study for Statistics Canada. Some of this can be explained by the fact immigrant parents are more likely to have university educations themselves and to live in big cities, she said, and those characteristics are associated with higher university graduation rates for their children. But even taking those factors into account, the children of immigrants - especially those from China or India - still fare better than others in education, Abada said. The scope of this study didn't allow researchers to discover why this might be, but similar research in the U.S. "suggests a sense of obligation to one's parents to do well academically" is at work, she said. University of Calgary students' union president Dalmy Baez says her close-knit South American family has played a major role in her success at school, whether it was 2 a.m. trips to photocopy campaign posters or cheering from the sidelines at debates and sporting events. Her Chilean mother and Paraguayan father met in Montreal after both immigrated to Canada and later moved to Calgary to raise Baez, 21, and her three siblings. Two of the Baez children attended university and two didn't, she said, though all have enjoyed success in their own fields. "I wasn't really sure if I was going to go to university," she said. "The second I started showing interest in school and subjects, they both became incredibly supportive and encouraging." Baez expects to graduate with a degree in political science and a minor in communications this spring and says she'll likely pursue a career in politics afterward. She and her siblings share a house in Calgary that they bought with their parents' help and now pay the mortgage on. A shortage of funds for post-secondary school can be a major barrier for the children of immigrants, Baez said, but for her parents it was crucial that their children get the most out of the life they built in Canada. "Our parents wanted us to take advantage of the opportunities we had here and they certainly weren't going to let us get away with not," she said.
  15. A man with a soft spot for Montreal's seafarers He kept a low profile but he was gregarious, a giant of Old Montreal, with a strong feel for its history ALAN HUSTAKThe Gazette Sunday, January 27, 2008 Grant Townsend, who owned a waterfront maritime supply company, was for more than 30 years involved in the direction of Mariners House, a hostel and social centre for itinerant seafarers in Old Montreal. Much more than an active Mariners House board member, he often contributed directly to sailors in need out of his own pocket. Townsend was 92 when he died at St. Mary's Hospital on Jan. 9. "He was a very good money manager. He was very involved in the welfare of Mariners House," said the institution's manager, Carolyn Osborne. "He never wanted to be board president because he was always bucking the board's considered opinion. "When our original building was put up for sale in the 1970s, the board was ready to take the first measly offer it could get, but he insisted they hold out for a much more substantial offer to guarantee the future of Mariners House." Grant William Townsend, the eldest of six children in a ship's chandler's family, was born in Montreal on Sept. 15, 1915, into a long line of seafarers. One of his ancestors was a British navy officer who took part in the siege of Louisbourg in 1758. His grandfather was the captain of a Nova Scotia windjammer. His father, Dudley Roy Townsend, founded the Montreal shipping supply company in 1917 and was Canada's comptroller for shipping supplies during the Second World War. For his contributions he was awarded the Order of the British Empire. Townsend had hoped to enlist in the Royal Canadian Navy during the war, but was rejected because of poor eyesight. Townsend was raised in Westmount and obtained an engineering degree from McGill University in 1950. He worked for Alcan then started a scaffolding company that he owned with a partner until he joined his father's business in 1961. Encouraged by his father, Townsend took an active interest in sailors' welfare and was a fundraiser for the Sailors' Institute. He helped negotiate its 1968 merger with the Catholic Sailors Club, which had been started in 1893, into the non-denominational Mariners House. A gregarious individual with a soft spot for those who worked the waterfront, he often housed as many or six or seven seamen in the second floor of his warehouse. "The work he did was unbelievable, he was always involved in service clubs, like the Rotary Club, and as vice-president of the Ship Suppliers Association. He kept a very low profile," said his widow, Berna Nardin. "He always could work his way around any problem and find a solution. "He was very determined. More than money, he used his influence to get things done. He was soft. He'd often hire people because they needed a job, not because they were necessarily qualified." Townsend's company warehouse in the Gillespie Moffatt building on Place d'Youville stood on the site of a mansion built in 1691 for Louis-Hector de Callière, who was governor of Montreal from 1684 to 1698 and then governor of New France until he died in 1703. Seven years ago Townsend sold the historic property to the Pointe à Callière archeological museum for well below its market value. It was, he said, his gift to the city. The museum plans to incorporate the foundations of the mansion into an expanded $30-million underground gallery. "He adored Old Montreal and was steeped in its history," Nardin said. "Rather than see the building fall into the hands of a developer who wouldn't respect the historic foundations, he wanted it preserved as an archeological site." His first marriage ended in divorce. He is survived by his second wife, Berna Nardin, a former teacher and translator whom he married in 1982, and by the four children he and his first wife adopted. [email protected] © The Gazette (Montreal) 2008 http://www.canada.com/components/print.aspx?id=d15bfab5-c24f-4c3f-862c-daeb870f75dc
  16. Trilingualism flourishes in Montreal Cheryl CornacchiaThe Gazette Tuesday, January 08, 2008 While widespread bilingualism remains an unattained goal in the rest of Canada, in Montreal, the level of trilingualism has jumped yet again. In 2006, the number of people in the Greater Montreal area able to converse in both of Canada's official languages plus another language, increased to 18 per cent up from 16.5 per cent in 2001. About 660,000 Montrealers know three languages, according to Jack Jedwab, the Montreal researcher who conducted the study that looks at trilingualism in 10 selected Canadian cities. "It's good news all around," said Jedwab, an executive director of the Association for Canadian Studies in Montreal. When it comes to language proficiency, Jedwab said, Montrealers far surpass those living in the nine other cities analyzed as part of the study. Montreal is not only one of North America's most cosmopolitan cities but also one of the most linguistically gifted, he said. "The message for the rest of the country," he added is that "where there is a will, there is a way." At 10.5 per cent and 10.2 per cent of their population, respectively, Toronto and Ottawa came the closest to Montreal for trilingual speakers. At 1.2 per cent, Halifax had the fewest number of trilingual speakers. Jedwab who teaches a course entitled Canada's Official Language Minorities: History and Demography at McGill University's Institute for the Study of Canada, analyzed 2006 Canadian census data, released last month, to arrive at the linguistic portrait. The study also found that in Montreal Armenians (77 per cent), followed by Italians (72.3 per cent) and, then, the Dutch (71.9 per cent) were the three most bilingual of the city's allophone groups. The least bilingual of the city's allophone groups, unable to speak either of Canada's official languages, were Cantonese (21 per cent), Cambodian (15.5 per cent) and Punjabi (15.3 per cent). Hagop Boulgarian, principal of l'École Armenien Sourp Hagop, a 675-student private elementary/secondary school in Montreal said the findings about his ethnic group didn't surprise him. With genocide and a diaspora in his people's history, Boulgarian said, learning new languages - and fast - has been an important survival tool for Armenians in general, not only the 25,000 living in the Greater Montreal region. Aloisio Mulas, acting director of the Picai Institute of Montreal, which is devoted to the promotion of Italian culture and language, said Italians in Montreal have shared that passion for speaking French and English. However, he said, attendance in Italian language classes at the institute have been falling over the past decade. Some families after a generation or two in the city, he said, become less concerned about ensuring their children keep up their Italian language skills. Denise De Haan Veilleux, a cultural attaché at the Consulate General of the Netherlands in Montreal said she is pleased but not surprised to see that so many Dutch living in Montreal are multilingual. In Holland, she said, children must study two languages, English and French or German when they reach high school. "It's just something you do," said De Hann Veilleux. "The attitude towards other languages is very different. "It's no big deal" added the 47-year-old francophone, who grew up in Quebec City and learned English and Dutch only after she married and moved abroad for various postings. With the family now back in Canada, she said, her 20-year-old son studying at McGill University and a 13-year-old daughter are lucky to be able to speak French, English, Dutch, German and Arabic. "It's like a present you give them as children," she said. "They don't have to learn as adults." [email protected] http://www.canada.com/components/print.aspx?id=0c56862f-bd4f-4df3-8ddd-8acc4d9e633d&k=76598