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  1. Finance guys all have Montreal roots Despite similar backgrounds, paths never crossed Elizabeth Thompson, Gazette Ottawa Bureau Published: 5 hours ago OTTAWA - They grew up only a few miles apart, when Montreal reigned as Canada's financial centre. All are products of English Montreal schools, born within five years of each other. They had newspaper routes - two hauling The Gazette; the third the Montreal Star. All three have sons. In all cases, their mothers have survived their fathers. All saw major changes to their careers at about the same time, in 1994-95. Before they were handed the finance portfolio by their respective parties, Conservative Jim Flaherty, Liberal John McCallum and New Democrat Thomas Mulcair's paths had never crossed. Now, as MPs prepare to deal with the mini-budget Flaherty is to deliver Tuesday, the paths of the three Montreal anglos will cross often. If you include Bloc Quebecois finance critic Paul Crete, who hails from Herouxville, all four MPs tasked with the finance portfolio grew up in Quebec. Typical of Montreal's anglo community, two of them - Flaherty and McCallum - headed down the 401 for better opportunities and now represent ridings in the Toronto area. However, all three say the experience of growing up as English Montrealers still influences how they approach life - and finance. Born Dec. 30, 1949, the finance minister is the oldest. Sixth of eight children in an Irish Catholic family, Flaherty grew up in a modest house on Broadway Ave. in Lachine. "I look at what my own kids expect today, their own rooms and so on," the father laughed of three sons. "We dreamed about that kind of thing." It was also in that neighbourhood the man who is now responsible for raising revenue for the government had his first job, delivering copies of the Star. "I had to go out and collect from people." After elementary school, Flaherty went to Loyola High School. While there, his family moved to N.D.G. in a house where his mother still lives. A hockey scholarship took him to Princeton University at age 16 in the mid-1960s. From there he did his law degree at Osgoode Hall in Toronto. Flaherty said his upbringing in Montreal and his years at Loyola are reflected in some of the measures he has introduced, such as his ground-breaking registered disability savings plan. "Those are part of the values that I grew up with. That you look to see if there is uneveness and try to level the playing field. Not to make everyone the same but to make sure everyone has equal opportunity. I think that comes from growing up in Montreal." Watching Canada's financial centre shift from Montreal to Toronto also influenced Flaherty. "We grew up thinking of Montreal as a financial centre. Of course, later Toronto grew as a financial centre and now Calgary. So it teaches me the dynamism of the movement of capital." Studying the movement of capital is what took McCallum to Toronto when he left his job as a professor at McGill University in 1994 to become chief economist for the Royal Bank. Born April 9, 1950, one of four children, McCallum's upbringing was perhaps the most privileged. He was raised in Pointe Claire, Senneville (where he delivered The Gazette) and then Westmount, where he attended Selwyn House. From 14 to 18, McCallum boarded at Trinity College School in Port Hope, Ont., then studied in Cambridge and Paris before returning to do a PhD at McGill. He worked in Manitoba and British Columbia from 1974 to 1982 before teaching at the Universite du Quebec a Montreal, then McGill. McCallum said his time at UQAM had a lasting effect. "That experience of being at UQAM, which is not only French but kind of sovereignist, influenced my thinking quite a lot about Quebec, about Quebec and Canada. Being an anglo Montrealer but also being immersed in the franco world has influenced my thinking quite a bit." While McCallum has never met Mulcair, he knows a number of the people Mulcair worked with at Alliance Quebec. His three sons are about the same age as Mulcair's two, and both men worked for the Manitoba government - Mulcair only a few years after McCallum. Born Oct. 24, 1954, Mulcair is the youngest, and the newest arrival to Parliament, elected in last month's Outremont by-election. The offspring of an Irish-Canadian father and a French- Canadian mother, Mulcair, like Flaherty, grew up in a large family of 10 children where he had to learn to fend for himself. Like Flaherty, one of his first jobs was a paper route. "That's how I had spending money through high school and into CEGEP. I had a really big route. I had over 100 Gazettes on Saturday." His years at Laval Catholic High School "probably gave me a little bit better preparation for the rough and tumble," he says. Mulcair, who studied law at McGill, took the leap into politics in 1994, only a few months before Flaherty did, getting elected as a Liberal to the National Assembly. Like Flaherty, he went on to serve in cabinet. Like his counterparts, Mulcair says his background as an anglophone Montrealer will play a role in how he approaches his new job as NDP finance critic. "It gives me a lot of sensitivity to the priorities of Quebecers." [email protected]
  2. Source: Montreal Gazette Immigration in Canada by the numbers By Kirsten Smith, Postmedia News The proportion of foreign-born population in G8 countries and Australia (reported statistically) Japan — 1.0 per cent (2000) Italy — 8.0 per cent (2009) Russia — 8.2 per cent (2002) France — 8.6 per cent (2008) United Kingdom — 11.5 per cent (2010) United States — 12.9 per cent (2010) Germany — 13 per cent (2010) Canada — 20.6 per cent (2011) Australia — 26.8 per cent (2010) Recent immigration (2006 to 2011) Canada — 1.2 million Toronto — 381,745 Montreal — 189,730 Vancouver — 155,125 Calgary — 70,700 Edmonton — 49,930 Winnipeg — 45,270 Ottawa-Gatineau — 40,420 Saskatoon — 11,465 Windsor — 9,225 Regina — 8,150 The make-up of first-, second- and third-generation immigrants compared to total population: First generation (born outside Canada): 7.2 million or 22 per cent Of them: • 93.3 per cent immigrants • 4.9 per cent foreign students and foreign workers • 87,400 were born outside Canada to parents who are Canadian Second generation (born in Canada but at least one parent was born abroad): 5.7 million or 17.4 per cent • 54.8 per cent said both their parents were born outside Canada • B.C. was home to the most second generation residents 23.4 per cent • 3 in 10 second-generation residents were a visible minority Third generation (born in Canada, both parents also born in Canada): 19.9 million or 60.7 per cent Read more: http://www.canada.com/Immigration+Canada+numbers/8354135/story.html#ixzz2SiAN7sP2
  3. Cast Brad Pitt ... Benjamin Button Cate Blanchett ... Daisy True there is many more. It's being filmed in Old Montreal, starting on Monday / Tuesday. I just can't believe the place I am moving into now is going too be part of the movie background. Paris 1950's. If I can I'll take photos of the set and try and get some quick video clips
  4. et vous ? Dites nous .... moi en novembre (je voulais mettre un poll mais j'ai que 10 options.... )
  5. Quebec monk declared saint for his 'boundless charity' Sun. Oct. 17 2010 5:19 PM ET The humble Quebec monk who founded Montreal's St. Joseph's Oratory was named a saint by Pope Benedict in a ceremony at the Vatican Sunday. The former Brother Andre, who was credited with miracle healings before his death in 1937, is now known as St. Andre. The Pope told the thousands of faithful gathered for the ceremony, including hundreds of Canadians, that although St. Andre was poorly educated and working at a menial job, he was an inspiration to many faithful. "(As) doorman at the Notre Dame College in Montreal, he showed boundless charity and did everything possible to soothe the despair of those who confided in him," Benedict said. Foreign Affairs Minister Lawrence Cannon led the official Canadian delegation to the ceremony. "Here is a person who throughout his life had a dream, and he was able to pursue that dream, he was able to build the St. Joseph Oratory in Montreal," Cannon told CTV News Channel on Sunday in a telephone interview from Rome. "So I think that when one looks at him, and what he was able to do throughout his life, he will be an inspiration for generations of Canadians to come." Francoise Bessette, whose grandfather was Brother Andre's first cousin, was among the thousands of Canadians in attendance. "I didn't think this would happen while I was alive," said Bessette, whose brother was named after the saint. "So to be here today is very special for me." In Montreal, the faithful crowded around a big-screen television in the Oratory's church to watch the ceremony broadcast live from St. Peter's Square. His elevation to sainthood will carry some worldly benefits for St. Andre's hometown, according to Kevin Wright, the president of the U.S.-based world religious travel association. "When an individual is declared a saint, their shrines attract significant numbers of visitors," Wright told CTV News Channel. "And we're going to see that in Montreal." He said that while the oratory that St. Andre founded is not as big a draw as sites like the French shrine at Lourdes, it already attracts an estimated one million pilgrims a year. And Wright said that St. Andre's sanctification will only boost those numbers. "Over the next couple of years we could see that double and get up to three, four or even five million people. And that's incredible." All the attention and ceremony would likely have embarrassed St. Andre, who was known for his humility and his faith, which has been described by Jean-Claude Cardinal Turcotte as strong enough "to move mountains." St. Andre was born Alfred Bessette in St-Gregoire-d'Iberville on Aug. 9, 1845, and was orphaned at the age of 12. In 1904, the Holy Cross brother founded Montreal's St. Joseph's Oratory, a landmark church on the northern slope of Mount Royal that receives about 2 million visitors every year. He became known for comforting the sick, and is credited with more than 100,000 miraculous healings before his death in 1937 at age 91. Two of those healings met the Vatican standard for a miracle, reported the Globe and Mail's Eric Reguly from Rome. The drive for the canonization goes back to 1940, when it was started by the Archdiocese of Montreal and the Congregation of Holy Cross and St. Joseph's Oratory. He was declared "venerable" by Pope Paul VI in 1978, and beatified -- declared "blessed" -- by Pope John Paul II in 1982. Benedict announced his canonization in February after officially recognizing a second miracle attributed to him. Brother Andre died at age 91 on Jan. 6, 1937. During the six days and nights before his funeral, more than one million people filed past his coffin. His heart still rests in a small shrine in the Oratory, where he was ultimately laid to rest. The heart, which is on public view as an object of contemplation for pilgrims, is protected by security systems after it was stolen in 1973. Police recovered it almost two years later from the basement of a home near Montreal. Brother Andre follows in the footsteps of Marguerite d'Youville, who was born in 1701 and was the first saint born on what is now Canadian territory. Canada's other saints are Marguerite Bourgeoys, who was born in France in 1620 and is considered the co-founder of Montreal, and eight French-born Jesuit martyrs who were killed during the 1640s. Benedict gave Australia its first saint, canonizing 19th-century nun Mary MacKillop. Also canonized Sunday were Stanislaus Soltys of Poland, Italians Giulia Salzano and Battista Camilla da Varano, and Candida Maria de Jesus Cipitria y Barriola of Spain. http://www.ctv.ca/CTVNews/TopStories/20101017/brother-andre-canonized-101017/
  6. Je suis surpris qu'il n'y ait pas déjà un fil sur les grands architectes. Alors je commence le bal avec celui-ci... Bernard Tschumi. Bernard Tschumi (born January 25, 1944 Lausanne, Switzerland) is an architect, writer, and educator, commonly associated with deconstructivism. Born of French and Swiss parentage, he works and lives in New York and Paris. He studied in Paris and at ETH in Zurich, where he received his degree in architecture in 1969. Tschumi has taught at Portsmouth Polytechnic in Portsmouth, UK, the Architectural Association in London, the Institute for Architecture and Urban Studies in New York, Princeton University, the Cooper Union in New York and Columbia University where he was Dean of the Graduate School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation from 1988 to 2003. Tschumi is a permanent U.S. resident. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bernard_Tschumi http://www.tschumi.com/