Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'bathurst'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Real estate projects
    • Proposals
    • Going up
    • Completed
    • Mass Transit
    • Infrastructures
    • Cultural, entertainment and sport projects
    • Cancelled projects
  • General topics
    • City planning and architecture
    • Economy discussions
    • Technology, video games and gadgets
    • Urban tech
    • General discussions
    • Entertainment, food and culture
    • Current events
    • Off Topic
  • MTLYUL Aviation
    • General discussion
    • Spotting at YUL
  • Here and abroad
    • City of Québec
    • Around the province of Québec.
    • Toronto and the rest of Canada
    • USA
    • Europe
    • Projects elsewhere in the world
  • Photography and videos
    • Urban photography
    • Other pictures
    • Old pictures

Calendars

There are no results to display.

There are no results to display.

Blogs

There are no results to display.

There are no results to display.


Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


About Me


Biography


Location


Interests


Occupation


Type of dwelling

Found 1 result

  1. Wanted: Trademark Toronto deli Anna MOrgan My family spends August rediscovering Toronto and, like most things we do, everything tends to revolve around food. This year, it occurred to me that in many ways the history of our city can be written in its deli. Top-quality Montreal smoked meat with a New York sour dill is easy to find around town. It's possible to find Polish potato latkes or stuff yourself with a Russian kishke. But where can you get Toronto-style anything? It's not that Toronto doesn't have great Jewish delis. We've got the best New York pastrami money can buy, and you don't have to go far to get lox and cream cheese on an oven-baked Montreal bagel. Indeed, anyone looking for a good deli can find restaurants up and down Bathurst St. For the strictly kosher set, there's Dairy Treats and Marky's Deli, to name but two, and for bagel aficionados there is United Bakers and Bagel Plus, amongst others. And for those willing to venture slightly off Bathurst, the downtown crowd has an excellent Bay St. lunch spot actually called the New Yorker Deli, and Thornhill's popular Centre Street Deli imports the best of Montreal's Snowdon Deli cuisine. All great restaurants – I recommend each of them – but none features anything that Torontonians can distinctively call their own. Deli, of course, didn't begin in Toronto. European Jews, with their taste for pickled meats and cabbage, came to New York, mingled with the Irish and their taste for boiled meat and cabbage, and New York's corned beef and coleslaw sandwich was born. The same thing happened in the bakeries, where the European oddity of boiled buns met the American ingenuity for mass production, creating the now ubiquitous bagel. A similar phenomenon happened in Quebec, where Jews and their bagels encountered the pizzeria, giving birth to the oven-baked delicacy now known as the Montreal bagel. Likewise, corned beef met the northern and rural penchant for curing in a smokehouse, eventually adding Montreal's distinctive smoked meat to the deli mix. Now back to my original question: Given our "world class city" aspirations, where's the uniquely Toronto deli food? Everyone loves a Shopsy's or Kwinter's hot dog. But similar tube steaks are found in ballparks from Boston to Miami. Likewise, while there is nothing better than a crisp Strub's pickle, delicious gherkins can be fished out of brine in barrels and jars all over America. Here's my theory. When Jews came to English Canada in the late 19th and early 20th century, they settled with their taste for deli and created bustling centres like Toronto's Kensington Market. But back then, before massive immigration from across the globe, the best fare the locals had to offer – peameal bacon – was hardly something that melded with the Jewish palate. It may have been tasty, but it just didn't fit the bill. So even though there might be nothing more Canadian than the image of Doug and Bob McKenzie sipping on suds and frying up some savoury back bacon, there is also nothing less kosher. You can't even dress it up as kosher-style. Try as the early deli pioneers might, the culinary graft just didn't take. And now with multiculturalism firmly in place, we may be stuck with having the best of everyone else's deli but nothing distinctively our own. In the meantime, as summer ends, I'm planning to shed my Toronto-style vanity, swallow my pride and order up a Montreal smoked meat sandwich (medium, not lean). That is unless someone comes up with Toronto's very own kosher Canadian bacon-style deli meat. Sounds delish, eh?