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Found 2 results

  1. At A.T. Kearney, our Global Cities Index (GCI) examines a comprehensive list of 84 cities on every continent, measuring how globally engaged they are across 26 metrics in five dimen*sions: business activity, human capital, information exchange, cultural experience, and political engagement (see Appendix: Global Cities Index Methodology). Since we began the GCI in 2008, we've continually refreshed our metrics to reflect emerging trends, analyzed how cities evolve along each of them, and developed insights about how a city can become more global. ... Montréal ranks 30th ahead of Vancouver and many other important cities like Zurich , Roma , Munich , Houston and Atlanta . Click on the following link for the report : http://www.atkearney.com/documents/10192/4461492/Global+Cities+Present+and+Future-GCI+2014.pdf/3628fd7d-70be-41bf-99d6-4c8eaf984cd5
  2. Trilingualism flourishes in Montreal Cheryl CornacchiaThe Gazette Tuesday, January 08, 2008 While widespread bilingualism remains an unattained goal in the rest of Canada, in Montreal, the level of trilingualism has jumped yet again. In 2006, the number of people in the Greater Montreal area able to converse in both of Canada's official languages plus another language, increased to 18 per cent up from 16.5 per cent in 2001. About 660,000 Montrealers know three languages, according to Jack Jedwab, the Montreal researcher who conducted the study that looks at trilingualism in 10 selected Canadian cities. "It's good news all around," said Jedwab, an executive director of the Association for Canadian Studies in Montreal. When it comes to language proficiency, Jedwab said, Montrealers far surpass those living in the nine other cities analyzed as part of the study. Montreal is not only one of North America's most cosmopolitan cities but also one of the most linguistically gifted, he said. "The message for the rest of the country," he added is that "where there is a will, there is a way." At 10.5 per cent and 10.2 per cent of their population, respectively, Toronto and Ottawa came the closest to Montreal for trilingual speakers. At 1.2 per cent, Halifax had the fewest number of trilingual speakers. Jedwab who teaches a course entitled Canada's Official Language Minorities: History and Demography at McGill University's Institute for the Study of Canada, analyzed 2006 Canadian census data, released last month, to arrive at the linguistic portrait. The study also found that in Montreal Armenians (77 per cent), followed by Italians (72.3 per cent) and, then, the Dutch (71.9 per cent) were the three most bilingual of the city's allophone groups. The least bilingual of the city's allophone groups, unable to speak either of Canada's official languages, were Cantonese (21 per cent), Cambodian (15.5 per cent) and Punjabi (15.3 per cent). Hagop Boulgarian, principal of l'École Armenien Sourp Hagop, a 675-student private elementary/secondary school in Montreal said the findings about his ethnic group didn't surprise him. With genocide and a diaspora in his people's history, Boulgarian said, learning new languages - and fast - has been an important survival tool for Armenians in general, not only the 25,000 living in the Greater Montreal region. Aloisio Mulas, acting director of the Picai Institute of Montreal, which is devoted to the promotion of Italian culture and language, said Italians in Montreal have shared that passion for speaking French and English. However, he said, attendance in Italian language classes at the institute have been falling over the past decade. Some families after a generation or two in the city, he said, become less concerned about ensuring their children keep up their Italian language skills. Denise De Haan Veilleux, a cultural attaché at the Consulate General of the Netherlands in Montreal said she is pleased but not surprised to see that so many Dutch living in Montreal are multilingual. In Holland, she said, children must study two languages, English and French or German when they reach high school. "It's just something you do," said De Hann Veilleux. "The attitude towards other languages is very different. "It's no big deal" added the 47-year-old francophone, who grew up in Quebec City and learned English and Dutch only after she married and moved abroad for various postings. With the family now back in Canada, she said, her 20-year-old son studying at McGill University and a 13-year-old daughter are lucky to be able to speak French, English, Dutch, German and Arabic. "It's like a present you give them as children," she said. "They don't have to learn as adults." [email protected] http://www.canada.com/components/print.aspx?id=0c56862f-bd4f-4df3-8ddd-8acc4d9e633d&k=76598