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Found 37 results

  1. Hello everyone, I'm an airline employee and a big proponent of YUL and it's future development. Lately I have been using Toronto's public transit system to get to the airport. Even though not as developed as ours, their subway, combined with the new 192 Airport Rocket, is really a winning combination, and has made me really step back and take at look at YUL and our airport access (just a bit better than terrible). From Kipling station the Airport Rocket is a 15 minute express bus from a metro directly to Terminal 1, 3 and Airport road near the hotels. Now before you start, yes, I know Montreal has this too in our 747 bus, directly from Lionel Groulx. However, the difference lies in that the Toronto express bus is part of their transit system, and only costs 3.00$, and a transfer from anywhere else in the network is valid. Why on earth would we charge 10$ for such a service?!?! It should almost be free! Anyway, I just wish the STM would make the 747 a regular bus line with a regular fare and transfers from the other parts of the network accepted, then we could call our airport SOMEWHAT accessible. And don't even get me started on the fact they now have direct train access......argh Rant Over.
  2. (Courtesy of Wings Magazine) --- (Courtesy of Auto123) Both articles are pretty old, but they are still interesting too say the least. For the ICAR, thats pretty awesome to see they actually were able to get part of the mirabel airport Now people from Montreal do not have too really go to Tremblant for a track meet day
  3. Exclusive Business Class Travel Between Toronto and Montreal MONTREAL, Feb. 28, 2017 /CNW Telbec/ - Ufly, a new business class travel experience, announced today that it will sell exclusive flights between the Billy Bishop and Saint-Hubert airports from Monday to Friday, at a frequency of two round trips daily. Offering numerous advantages such as online bookings at a fixed rate, last minute boarding in addition to quick and easy access to aircrafts, Ufly and Pascan Aviation are every business traveler's dream. An accessible, exclusive and efficient service Ideal for frequent business flyers, Ufly truly demonstrates a full executive treatment: comfortable, exclusive and luxurious. Thanks to its unprecedented service offering, Ufly members can take advantage of a VIP lounge, a dedicated phone reservation line, a mobile application, and free parking near the priority security checkpoint and check-in. As a high-end luxury service provider, Ufly sells seats on private nine-seater Pilatus PC 12 planes, the safest on the market, equipped with comfortable, large leather seats that are operated by Pascan Aviation. Available on a member-only basis, Ufly proposes several membership types to meet every travelers' corporate budget allowances. Furthermore, ticket prices do not fluctuate throughout the year, allowing users to benefit from fixed rates that include snacks and beverages and an unlimited number of flights! For more information, go to uFly. About Ufly Launched in February 2017, Ufly sells tickets for Pascan Aviation between Saint-Hubert airport and Billy Bishop airport in Toronto, as well as between Saint-Hubert airport and Québec City, Val-d'Or and Bagotville. Ufly is primarily designed for business professionals and offers preferential access to planes operated by Pascan Aviation. The service is designed to dramatically reducing airport wait times. Members have access to an unlimited number of flights at a fixed rate. Ufly plans to offer more routes in the upcoming year. For more information, go to uFly.
  4. A bridge in Mumbai Halfway to paradise A half-built bridge symbolises the urgency and the frustrations of improving India’s infrastructure Dec 22nd 2012 |From the print edition N 1988, when V.S. Naipaul arrived in Bombay, now known as Mumbai, and drove south from its airport, he could tell something unusual was happening because the traffic was so bad. It turned out that a festival of Dalits, the former untouchables, had led to crowds that blocked the roads. The Nobel-prizewinning writer complained of “fumes and heat and din” in his taxi to the Taj Hotel. The chaos was novel enough to form the opening passage of his book, “A Million Mutinies Now”. Today greater Mumbai’s population has almost doubled to 18m, and transport bedlam has become as integral to its psyche as the stockmarket, films and slums. Millions endure commutes that would qualify them for post-traumatic-stress counselling in rich countries. Rush-hour trains get so crushed that a phone or pair of glasses carried in a breast pocket will smash under the pressure of bodies. Every year perhaps 500 people perish after falling off trains in the city and 6,000 die on the tracks. If, like Mr Naipaul, you can afford a taxi, it will reek of sweat and honk and buck for inches of advantage against bigger cars, which under a Darwinian highway code have bullying rights. After monsoon storms the sewers overflow and the roads flood. On nights like this endless lines of vehicles crawl in the dark and you can hear the slop lapping on your car’s underbelly, like waves on a dinghy’s hull. But if you divert from Mr Naipaul’s route, by a creek at a place called Mahim, and turn west, you can take a different trip. Time leaps forward. India becomes China, or even Singapore. The swarm of autorickshaws fades and, after pausing at a toll booth, you find yourself on an eight-lane motorway running parallel with the coast, floating high over the sea on 120 piers, and suspended on wires from two 128-metre towers. The bridge is called the Sea Link and opened in 2009. If you open the window the air is fresh; if you put your foot down you can hit racing speed. From the bridge Mumbai’s berserk skyline seems hazy; the 23 sets of traffic lights and 40 minutes of furious traffic you are bypassing are like a bad dream. The Portuguese fort and aboriginal fishing village that you zip past feel about as real as the scenery of a Disneyland ride. For that matter, can it truly be possible that after just 4.7km, or about five minutes, all eight lanes of this glorious bridge stop in mid-air—as if King Kong had bitten them off? But alas, it is. If you keep going you will plunge into the Arabian Sea. Instead a narrow slip road delivers you back to the city. The shift is disorienting. As your car battles for space again and you pass a Dalit slum, perhaps housing the children of the folk Mr Naipaul saw, it is tempting to look back. What just happened? Viewed from the Sea Link, Mumbai seems like a mirage. But seen from the chaos of the city, it is the Sea Link that is improbable, like a giant hologram. Decent infrastructure and this megacity, maybe this country, do not belong together. Do they? Dream on If any country needs better infrastructure, it is fast-urbanising India. The government hopes a trillion dollars will be spent between 2012 and 2017, although with a creaking banking sector and jumpy investors that is optimistic. If any megacity needs better transport, it is Mumbai. Formed from seven islands, the city was given by Portugal to Charles II of England in 1661 as dowry for his marriage to Catherine of Braganza. It is a long spit whose hub is at its southern tip. Manhattan has 16 bridges, four underwater tunnels and a ferry system linking it to the mainland. Mumbai has just six bridges, all but one at its northern extremity. Two main roads, three railway lines and an airport besieged by shanty towns are its fragile links to the outside world. The city centre is like a head on a long, strangled neck. The difficulty of commuting is partly why Mumbai is so densely populated, with property prices driven high and migrants forced into slums, which now house over half the population. There are only a handful of successful state-sponsored developments: a satellite city on the mainland called Navi (New) Mumbai, some flyovers and a new office park built on marshland near the airport. What Mumbai has been unable to do in practice, it has done in theory. The first master plan to relieve the city’s woes emerged in 1948, the most recent in 2011. In the six decades in between some fine minds, from J.R.D. Tata, a revered industrialist, in 1981, to McKinsey, a consulting firm, in 2003, have had their say. There is widespread agreement on what is required. First, a road round the city’s perimeter—probably a series of Sea Link-style bridges along its entire west coast, and on its east coast a highway partly to be built on land occupied by the city’s dying old port. Second, to link this ring to the mainland, a 22km road over the sea, an idea known as the “trans-harbour link”. Third, near the end of this putative bridge, on the mainland, a new airport. And fourth, at least nine metro lines in the city itself. You can get a flavour of this Utopia in the offices of one of the many government agencies responsible for projects in Maharashtra, the state Mumbai belongs to. A huge, Lego-for-adults model built by a Singaporean firm shows the city centre bisected by an elevated bridge that sweeps in from the ocean. Vast new skyscrapers tower over the Art Deco and colonial buildings. Today’s shabby military cantonment is a nature park. Metro stations are everywhere. Jetties for ferries are abundant. A slum has become a “heritage village” with yachts moored beside it. The sea is blue, the grass is green and the buildings are spotless white. All of it is made up. Indeed of all the transport mega-projects planned for Mumbai, after decades of reports and committees, only one is in use: that surreal 4.7km stretch of the Sea Link. Kafka in Bombay What has gone wrong? One view can be heard on the wasteland at the north abutment of the Sea Link. A ragged family are smashing reinforced concrete rubble. They say they get about a dollar for every two kilos of steel inside—roughly the cost of a one-way Sea Link ticket. Nearby, dogs and feral pigs sniff around abandoned machinery as Girish, aged 52, hits the bottle with his colleagues. The pals work nights in a call centre selling Americans an erectile-dysfunction drug. “You get a quick recharge,” is the sales pitch; the most common response, they all agree, is “Fuck you”. They also agree that this derelict land is a fine spot to unwind. Yet the rumour, which seems to have originated in the nearby slum, is that it has been grabbed secretly by a tycoon to build a mall, or luxury flats; the details vary. A local priest (a church was built nearby in 1575) talks suspiciously of the “fantasy” that any such project could ever benefit the common man. In fact, the land is still owned by the government. But the conspiracy theory that Mumbai is essentially a stitch-up by the rich is not propounded only by drunk cold-callers and men of the cloth. It may be the most widely held belief in the city. Its grandest iteration is that the city’s elite has deliberately sabotaged its transport infrastructure to enrich themselves. The argument goes like this: better transport would lower the scarcity premium on land and property in downtown Mumbai, hurting builders’ profits, and in turn curbing the flow of bribes to India’s political parties. The idea that the rich control the city’s fate was fuelled by a battle in 2005-08 between Mukesh Ambani, India’s richest man, and his estranged brother, Anil, over a tender to build the trans-harbour link. After a legal tussle Anil undercut his brother by bidding for a concession of nine years and 11 months. The tender process was eventually abandoned. Mumbai is certainly corrupt in other ways. The chief minister of Maharashtra, Prithviraj Chavan, who wants to clean things up, speaks of a nexus of builders and politicians. One official reckons illegal gains of $5 billion a year have been made by builders bribing their way around planning rules. “Those bastards have ruined everything” by scaring off legitimate firms, says one boss. But the grand conspiracy theory is silly. Mukesh Ambani owns a chunk of land near the proposed new airport, the value of which would soar if the trans-harbour link were built. Builders are buying space near proposed metro stations. And without good transport links the population of south Mumbai has begun to decline, which should be bad for property prices. Most businesspeople say the city’s decay is an embarrassment. The truth is fiddlier—as the half-built Sea Link demonstrates. The bridge was commissioned in 1999 but took ten years to finish, instead of the planned two and a half. Ajit Gulabchand, the boss of HCC, the construction firm that won the contract to build it, says the project was “a Kafkaesque struggle”. He describes himself as a “south Bombay boy” and drives a Bentley through the city to his office in the north-east (he does not use the Sea Link because there are no good connections between the west and the east). He is also subject, like all tycoons, to a secondary conspiracy theory, which is that he gained by being close to Sharad Pawar, who heads a Maharashtrian political clan. Mr Gulabchand says this is rubbish. “I’m not going to deny my friendship,” he says. But, “If I’m so powerful, how come I lost money?” One recent fiasco involved a military convoy doing a U-turn, a naval ambulance, a man in flip-flops with a red flag, and thousands of angry drivers The bridge’s original budget was $74m at current exchange rates, which rose to double that (officials verify these figures). Mr Gulabchand says he is still owed around $100m. The rising cost reflects a deep problem: delays. After construction began the cash-starved road agency in charge, MSRDC, changed the plan from eight lanes to four and back to eight again. The council took an age to release the land needed to house machinery (near where the call-centre employees relax). Maritime rules banned work during the monsoon. Customs held up the import of a 5,400-tonne floating crane. Subsea telecoms cables were found in the wrong place. Old folk living nearby griped about noise pollution. Those are the kind of problems big projects face everywhere. But other hurdles were peculiarly Indian. In a 107-year-old house in the fishing village the bridge passes over at its southern end sits Vijay Worlikar, one of the “nine Patils”, or clan chiefs, who in effect run the area. He is a Koli, an aboriginal people who have been there for centuries; he has childhood memories of Iranian boats sailing to the village to trade pistachios for dried fish. “This land is our land,” he says. Mr Worlikar successfully campaigned to shift the bridge farther from the village, and for a second suspended section to be built to create a channel for the fishing fleet to sail underneath. His legal objections, along with other environmental complaints, caused years of delays. Yet he is a modern man: his daughter is a doctor and his son an executive at the airport. He blames sloppy planning. He says he is now helping the state build relations with other fishing villages in the city to try to avoid further fiascos. Cutting red tape and winning public support would be easier with political leadership. The Sea Link was opened, with a firework display, by Sonia Gandhi, the dynast of India’s ruling Congress Party, and was officially named after her assassinated husband, Rajiv. However, consistent with the rule that the more politicians celebrate a finished project, the less they did to make it happen, the Sea Link had earlier been left out to dry. Mr Gulabchand says that after the state government changed in 1999 and an energetic minister left, the plan had no sponsor to bulldoze through bureaucracy. Maharashtra’s ruling coalition since 1999, of the Congress Party and the NCP, often squabbles over who runs big projects. The politicians have rural vote banks and are afraid, as one official puts it, “to be seen to neglect the rural man”. Mr Gulabchand thinks Mumbai needs more political accountability: “The Sea Link would not have been delayed if there was a mayor responsible for doing it. His re-election would have depended on it.” For the time being, such a change in the city’s governance seems unlikely. Mumbai’s biggest secret To grow fast India needs lots more infrastructure. But lately spending has been falling. The central bank thinks that the value of envisioned projects dropped by 52% in 2011-12. The slump reflects worries about red tape, corruption and doubts about the profitability of public-private partnerships (PPPs). In Mumbai it is easy to despair. “The whole spirit of doing things has gone,” says Mr Gulabchand. Five kilometres south of Mr Worlikar’s village is a fenced plot by the sea where men sit on plastic seats, apparently anticipating, like actors in a production of “Waiting for Godot”, the next section of the Sea Link to arrive. It could be a while. The winner of a PPP project to build and run it, Anil Ambani, has got cold feet. A political tussle has erupted, with the NCP keen to build a bridge using public funds and Congress preferring a road on reclaimed land. Nothing may happen for years. Yet, just as the Sea Link manages those 4.7km of elevated bliss, some projects are moving. Beneath a hill owned by an atomic research agency in north Mumbai, roaring diggers have almost finished excavating two half-kilometre-long tunnels. Outside, in both directions, the ghastly task of clearing slums has been accomplished and their residents moved to blocks of flats nearby. This is part of Mumbai’s best-kept secret—the Eastern Freeway, a new road stretching all the way down the city’s east coast, on the opposite side from the Sea Link, using tunnels and stilts. It should open in 2013, about five years after work began. J.R. Dhane, an engineer on the project, says it has been like painstakingly weaving a thread through the city’s dense fabric. Elsewhere the first metro line is almost finished, its platforms inches away from living-room windows, an experimental monorail is coming up, and a new round of bids is set to begin on a contract to build and operate a $2 billion trans-harbour link. These projects are all being run by the MMRDA, a state development body that has stepped into the vacuum. It owns land worth $12 billion, which it sells to help finance projects, and is viewed as clean and technocratic. Its boss, Rahul Asthana, says that progress is being made, but seems cautious about the city making a Shanghai-style great leap forward. In all probability Mumbai will do enough to prevent a crisis, but not enough to fulfil its vast potential or quickly transform the quality of most of its people’s lives. The same is true of infrastructure across India. And what of that 4.7km stretch of the Sea Link, stranded out there, all alone? The bridge is in good nick but seems to be run poorly by the road agency, MSRDC (its chief declined interview requests). Vehicle numbers are thought to be half those expected. The financial impact is hard to assess: the most recent annual report on the agency’s website is from 2008. Waiting for Utopia Meanwhile the toll-booth system has become a slapstick affair, with a maze of concrete chicanes prone to collapse, complex cash fares and overstaffed booths. Usually receipts are printed, but occasionally they are hand-stamped on the kind of paper used for bingo tickets. Accusations of graft swirl. An electronic swipe system has apparently been introduced but seems to be available only to VIPs. After a suicide jump in August it emerged that the CCTV system to help stop terrorist attacks was not working properly. One recent fiasco involved a military convoy doing a U-turn on the bridge, a naval ambulance, a man in flip-flops with a red flag like a Formula One race official, and thousands of angry drivers. This created a traffic jam along most of the Sea Link, which seemed at last to have become part of the city. Often couples on motorbikes park by the bridge. They are not there to ride on it—two-wheelers are prohibited. They are not seeking intimacy, for the choice spot for that is the rocks around the headland at low tide. Nor are they there for the ambience, for the ground nearby features broken promenades, weeds and rats. They are there for the view. When you see its sweeping cords silhouetted against a dusky sky, the Sea Link is as close to a wonder as Mumbai can offer. And whether this ritual demonstrates low expectations or hope is in the minds of the beholders alone. http://www.economist.com/news/christmas-specials/21568582-half-built-bridge-symbolises-urgency-and-frustrations-improving-indias
  5. Air Canada Adds Lyon, London-Gatwick to its Growing Global Network New mainline service between Montreal and Lyon will be only year-round flight between North America and France's second largest metropolitan area New Air Canada rouge route to London-Gatwick complements and builds on the success of Air Canada flights to London Heathrow, Air Canada's largest international gateway MONTREAL, June 25, 2015 /CNW Telbec/ - Air Canada today further expanded its extensive global network with the announcement of new non-stop services to Lyon, France and London's Gatwick airport beginning in summer 2016. The two new routes will provide customers even more convenient options when travelling to Europe for business or leisure. "Pursuing our ongoing strategy to expand internationally, Air Canada is pleased to offer customers non-stop, year-round service between Montreal and Lyon, heart of the second largest metropolitan area in France. Air Canada continues to serve Paris Charles de Gaulle and this new Air Canada mainline route will further increase convenience for customers travelling to France as well as provide the only year-round service between North America and Lyon. It also complements our Air Canada rouge Nice-Côte d'Azur service," said Benjamin Smith, President, Passenger Airlines, at Air Canada. "Our new seasonal Air Canada rouge service between Toronto and London's Gatwick airport will complement our extensive operation at London Heathrow, our largest gateway outside Canada with non-stop service from eight Canadian cities. Air Canada rouge is ideally-suited to serve London-Gatwick, with its focus on leisure travel and provide easy access to southern London. This new service will also make us the only Canadian carrier serving multiple airports in the London region and complements our Air Canada rouge service to Manchester and Edinburgh. Both new routes offer customers convenient connection times with our extensive domestic, U.S. transborder and international network." James Cherry, President and Chief Executive Officer of Aéroports de Montréal said: "This new scheduled service between Montreal and Lyon, France's second-largest urban area, is excellent news that further supports Montreal–Trudeau's positioning as a hub between North America and Europe, particularly French-speaking Europe." Howard Eng, President and Chief Executive Officer of the Greater Toronto Airports Authority said: "As Canada's largest gateway hub airport, we welcome Air Canada's announcement of a new rouge service from Toronto Pearson to London's Gatwick airport starting next summer. This new service will offer our passengers even more choice and convenience when it comes to planning their travel schedule – and that's an important part of how we're working to put our passengers first." Tickets for both routes will be available for purchase starting July 2, 2015 and service between Montreal and Lyon will begin June 16, 2016 and operate up to five-times weekly with an Airbus A330-300 aircraft with 37 International Business Class lie-flat suites and 228 Economy class seats. Air Canada rouge's summer seasonal service between Toronto and London-Gatwick will begin May 19, 2016 and operate up to seven-times weekly with a Boeing 767-300ER aircraft with 24 Premium rouge seats and 256 rouge seats. All flights are timed to optimize connectivity through Air Canada's Montreal and Toronto hubs respectively. Air Canada Montreal-Lyon Flight From To Depart Arrive Frequency AC828 Montreal Lyon 21:10 10:20 (+1 day) Up to five times a week AC829 Lyon Montreal 12:00 14:00 Up to five times a week
  6. I'm going to enjoy the popcorn and watch the whiners come out "http://business.financialpost.com/news/transportation/air-canada-wants-torontos-pearson-airport-to-be-a-mega-hub-but-high-costs-stand-in-the-way" "Canada has long been an afterthought for the global aviation market, an out-of-the-way destination with taxes and fees so high that some five million Canadians a year trek across the border to fly out of cheaper U.S. airports. But Air Canada and the Greater Toronto Airports Authority (GTAA) are determined to flip that view on its head by turning Toronto’s Pearson International Airport into a mega-hub on the scale of Amsterdam’s Schiphol, Singapore’s Changi or Dubai International Airport. Pearson is already well on its way to meeting that goal since it attracts more international passengers than any other airport in North America except John F. Kennedy International Airport (JFK) in New York City. Toronto’s primary airport is now the fourth-largest entry point by air into the United States, surpassing many large U.S. airports, according to National Bank analyst Cameron Doerksen. But to become a true mega-hub comparable in scope and status to the Dubais of the world, a lot needs to change. Pesky taxes and fees make Pearson “the most expensive airport in the world at which to land a plane,” according to a 2012 Senate report. There’s also the problem of congestion — in the airport, on its runways and on surrounding roadways — that will only get worse unless significant investments are made in infrastructure. If these issues aren’t addressed, Pearson could miss out on an opportunity to become part of the exclusive mega-hub club — there are currently only 11 worldwide — and all the attendant economic benefits, including the creation of more than 200,000 jobs in the area. Jack Boland / Toronto Sun / QMI Agency Jack Boland / Toronto Sun / QMI AgencyToronto's Pearson International Airport is a hub for passengers coming into Canada domestically and internationally. The GTAA, which manages and operates Pearson, defines a mega-hub as an airport that processes 50 million passengers a year, including at least 20 million international passengers, and connects to 80 per cent of the global economy. Pearson is pretty close to those numbers. In 2015, it moved 41 million passengers, including 25 million international travellers, and connected to 67 per cent of the global economy. It was recently ranked 19th in the world for its connectivity — sandwiched between Philadelphia, which is not a mega-hub, and Frankfurt, which is — by air-travel intelligence company OAG. There’s plenty of potential for further growth at Pearson. Howard Eng, GTAA’s chief executive, said the airport has the largest catchment area — defined as the population within a 90-minute flight — of any airport in North America, bigger than even JFK or Los Angeles International Airport (LAX). Pearson also has an enthusiastic partner in Air Canada, which accounts for 57.6 per cent of the airport’s seat capacity, according to the Centre for Aviation, and has been pursuing an aggressive international growth strategy using its new fleet of Boeing 787s. To support Air Canada, the GTAA has agreed to fix the airline’s fees for 10 years in exchange for agreed-upon passenger growth targets, and will offer rebates if it exceeds those targets. “They want to be a mega-carrier and, as a result of that, they need a mega-hub to work out of,” Eng said in an interview. “We’re both aligned on the concept.” One of Air Canada’s main growth pillars is expanding so-called sixth-freedom traffic, or traffic from a second country to a third country via an airline’s home market. In Air Canada’s case, that primarily means Americans travelling from their home cities via Toronto to destinations in Europe or Asia. The airline’s stated goal is to attract a 1.5-per-cent “fair share” of the U.S. sixth-freedom market, which would add $600 to $700 million in incremental revenue, but chief executive Calin Rovinescu said it can probably do “much better than that.” “We’ve been basically increasing our sixth-freedom flying by mid-to high-teen (percentages) in each of the last two years,” Rovinescu said in a recent interview. He hopes to turn Pearson into a “world-class hub” comparable to Amsterdam, Singapore or Dubai. Related How you can nab premium flights without paying through the nose Air Canada ready to compete with new, low-cost airlines, CEO says “Those countries don’t have a large population base, but they have built very powerful hubs,” Rovinescu said. “Toronto is still relatively speaking underserved in terms of the catchment area and the market potential for it.” But in order to become a truly successful mega-hub, Pearson will need to overcome two major limitations. The first is those exceedingly high costs that drive so many Canadians to U.S. border airports — the equivalent of 64 Boeing 737s every day, according to a 2012 report by the Standing Senate Committee on Transport and Communications. The World Economic Forum’s 2015 Travel and Tourism Competitiveness Report ranked Canada 124th out of 141 countries on price competitiveness. This is a function of Canada’s “antiquated” national airport model, according to a recent review of the Canada Transportation Act (CTA) by former federal cabinet minister David Emerson. In 1994, the federal government transferred the management, operation and development of 26 major airports to non-profit airport authorities while retaining ownership of their land and fixed assets and charging them rent. The GTAA pays Ottawa $130 million a year in ground rents for Pearson. Add in government security charges and, in Ontario, a jet-fuel tax that will hit 6.7 cents a litre by April 2017, and the airport is at a real cost disadvantage compared to its competitors. Tyler Anderson/National Post Tyler Anderson/National PostHoward Eng, president and CEO of the Greater Toronto Airports Authority (GTAA) Pearson’s landing charges alone are “twice that at Boston Logan, a third more than at Chicago O’Hare,” said David Bentley, chief airport analyst at the Australia-based Centre for Aviation. “You know why that is? It’s because of the ridiculous rents that they have to pay.” Emerson’s review of the CTA concluded that the solution is to move towards a fully privatized, for-profit structure with equity-based financing from large institutional investors. “Will privatization make a difference to Canada? I think it probably would,” Bentley said. “Toronto would become more efficient in terms of its costs to airlines and, therefore, could compete better with the likes of Chicago and other airports in the region.” Eng at the GTAA will not say whether he’d prefer a share-capital structure to the current non-profit system. But he’s quick to emphasize that Pearson is already run like a private entity, paying down $500 million in debt over the past four years and investing $700 million of capital in airport infrastructure and amenities since 2010. Pearson has also frozen or reduced the airlines’ average aeronautical fees per passenger for eight consecutive years, for a total reduction of 30 per cent since 2007. “We run it like a private corporation,” Eng said. “My focus is on how we can generate the revenue in order to pay down the debt, reinvest in the airport and create the facility that’s needed to process the passengers.” The second limitation at Pearson is congestion. The airport’s passenger traffic has grown so rapidly that the airport’s infrastructure — its security and customs checkpoints, runways, de-icing stations and even the surrounding roads — are having trouble keeping up. “A lot of people say there’s no competition for airports because every city has one large airport,” Eng said. “But once you’re into the global hub status, in Pearson’s case almost 35 to 40 per cent of our traffic is what we call transfer traffic, they have a choice.” Passengers who are connecting to another destination are generally looking for the shortest connection time, he said. To that end, Pearson is working to improve the flow of passengers and luggage by offering things such as self-serve baggage drops, automated border kiosks and automatic luggage transfers for passengers travelling from certain global cities to other Canadian destinations. However, Eng stressed that Pearson also needs the government’s help to speed up security and border processing times, which are notoriously slow. Most passengers at Pearson wait 20 minutes for pre-board screening compared to five minutes for 95 per cent of passengers at London’s Heathrow Airport and Hong Kong International Airport. “We’re not asking for a special favour, (just) that they provide their processes in a manner that is equivalent to what the best airports are doing around the world,” he said. Ernest Doroszuk/Toronto Sun/QMI Agency Ernest Doroszuk/Toronto Sun/QMI AgencyTravellers at Terminal 1 at Toronto Pearson International Airport The GTAA is also working with other airports in southern Ontario, including those in Hamilton, London and Kitchener-Waterloo, to encourage them to take some of the burden off Pearson by providing more short-haul, private-jet, cargo and charter flights. Another key part of Pearson’s mega-hub strategy is to improve the notoriously bad road traffic around the airport region. According to the GTAA, only 10 per cent of Pearson’s passengers arrive on public transit compared to 39 per cent in Amsterdam and 63 per cent in Hong Kong. A recent study by the Neptis Foundation found that there are a million car trips per day in and out of the Pearson region by employees and travellers. The recent launch of the Union Pearson Express rail line to downtown Toronto has helped, but “not enough,” Eng said. “We probably need various domestic lines, special lines, high-speed rail lines,” he said, adding that the GTAA is prepared to help fund the development of a ground-transportation hub at the airport, but it will need government support as well. fp1201_mega_hub_transitIf Pearson isn’t able to lower its costs and improve its infrastructure, it could miss out on a huge potential economic opportunity. According to Frontier Economics, becoming a mega-hub will increase the airport economic zone’s GDP by 75 per cent to $62.1 billion and create more than 200,000 jobs by 2030. “Airports are changing from city airports to airport cities,” said John Kasarda, director of the Center for Air Commerce at the University of North Carolina. Kasarda devised the concept of the “aerotropolis,” a notion that airports are far more than just transportation infrastructure, but rather anchors of regional business development. “The 21st-century airport is quite different than the 20th-century airport,” he said. “They’re multi-modal, multi-functional enterprises that attract a substantial amount of commercial development.” This can create a virtuous circle of expansion, Kasarda added. “Not only does the better airline connectivity, the route structure, serve as this magnet for business, but as business grows it generates greater volumes of passengers and cargo, which supports more airline connectivity,” he said. “It’s mutually reinforcing.” Smoother connections can also help keep airlines’ costs down by generating more non-aeronautical revenue from retail, restaurants and other services. “It’s a necessity, not an option,” Kasarda said.
  7. http://www.bbc.com/travel/feature/20131002-business-trip-montreal As one of Canada's largest cities, Montreal stands out from the pack for its combination of big city ambiance and small-town neighbourhoods, European flair and North American attitude. The confluence of culture and economy has also transformed the city – the second largest French-speaking city in the world – into a business hub for numerous industries, including aviation, banking and insurance. Operating a strong North American and transatlantic hub from Montreal-Trudeau International Airport, Air Canada has been a key driver behind the 1.4 million business travellers that arrived in Montreal in 2012. The airport (a 20km taxi ride from downtown clocks in at a flat 40 Canadian dollars) recently completed the first phase of its C$261 million expansion project named Gate 62, and the second stage will begin construction in 2014, adding six new wide body gates, including two equipped for the Airbus A-380 jumbo jet. ...
  8. The (mis)adventures of an Anglo in Montreal Petra Hendrickson Issue date: 4/9/08 Section: Opinion Montreal less than 48 hours ago, I thought I would use today's column as part anecdote, part travel advice and part opinion. The advice, although the most practical portion of this column by far, is the least fun to write about, so I'll dispense with it first. Make sure you tell your bank you're going abroad. Otherwise, their fraud department might put a block on your debit card after you use it to pay for a cab ride. This results in you having to apply for a new debit card, which will then take around 10 business days to be delivered to you. If you need help with something, ask. I have no recollection of the only other time I've flown internationally, and I was a little apprehensive about the customs and immigration process. Chances are, one of your fellow travelers will be more than happy to talk you through the process ahead of time. Granted, most people scoff at the idea of Canada being considered "international travel." Nonetheless, a flight there requires you to go through customs and immigration before leaving the airport, and chances are, you'll find something there that looks unfamiliar. Gas prices in Canada (or at least Montreal), for instance, are not only by the liter, rather than the gallon, they're also in cents. So a liter of gas is advertised as costing 114.2. Before I asked a fellow American at the graduate school I was visiting about the gas pricing system, I was pretty shocked. I mean, I knew gas prices were more expensive everywhere else, but even this seemed a little steep. Also, although I ate food while I was there, the fact that all menu items (even at Tim Horton's!) were in French pretty much means that I'm not entirely sure what I ate. There was Lebanese food of some kind, what I was told was a Chilean steak sandwich and a couple flavored croissants, but as far as specifics go, I'm pretty much at a loss. Everyone I encountered in Montreal was willing to accommodate English speakers, which was definitely much appreciated. My cab driver on my 1 a.m. excursion to the airport informed me that not only should I not have been shy about speaking English and being American, the locals don't mind at all because Americans are notoriously good tippers. The logic seems to follow that the more willingly people speak English to the Americans in Montreal, the more grateful the Americans will be, and the better they'll tip. I have to be honest. At least in my case, it was true. Most of the Anglo community seems to know how to speak enough French to get by ("restaurant French"), and certainly recognizes enough French to be able to differentiate street names from one another and the like. It was really interesting to me the combination of recognition and absolute confusion I experienced in the Francophone environment. On the one hand, words like café and boutique were easy markers as to what a building contained. On the other hand, all the words I didn't recognize meant that at some point, everything started to look the same, and it was pretty disorienting. On the whole, I'm definitely glad I visited Montreal. It was pretty eye-opening as to just how utterly American I am. I like to consider myself worldly in outlook, and I still think that's true, but it also made me consider exactly how non-worldly my experiences have been. http://media.www.indianastatesman.com/media/storage/paper929/news/2008/04/09/Opinion/The-misadventures.Of.An.Anglo.In.Montreal-3311500.shtml
  9. very depressing. http://www.ft.com/intl/cms/s/0/69d8aefa-95a7-11e4-a390-00144feabdc0.html#axzz3RFvv7YUu The Fast Lane: A premier city now second among equals Tyler BruleTyler Brûlé Montreal was Canada’s leading lady. The view last Saturday couldn’t have been more different S econd cities are always curious affairs. Often chippy, occasionally unassuming and always striving to be that little bit more distinct, quirky or boisterous than the comfy cousin who holds premier status on the international stage. Melbourne likes to trade on its Europeaness, seasons and liveability compared with Sydney’s beaches and overused Opera House. Residents of Osaka are loud and good-humoured, while Tokyoites are seen as too precious and concerned with protocol. Mancunians need to remind you of their industrial glory days, football teams and increasingly well-connected airport versus the gridlock of London. Second cities that used to hold the number one position are even stranger, particularly when their fall has been largely of their own making. Last weekend I returned to Montreal for the first time in about four years and the drive from the airport to downtown was a bittersweet journey along a route that used to dazzle in the early 1970s. Back then, the low-slung offices and factories lining the highway into the city carried the names of global brands and Canada’s industrial powerhouses. Downtown, skyscrapers and buildings from the turn of the 20th century carried the brass plaques of important banks and insurance companies. Montreal was Canada’s leading lady, the young nation’s port of first impressions. It had hosted a World Expo in 1967 and was about to run up a shameful debt in the form of the 1976 Summer Olympics. The view last Saturday couldn’t have been more different. Rather than the familiar logos, the words that dominated every other façade, in a variety of pleading fonts, was “à louer” (to rent), and these signs stretched from the perimeter fence of the airport all the way to the buildings around my hotel on the once elegant Sherbrooke Street. A plague of rental and for sale signs is generally a good indicator that things are not going quite to plan, whereas a skyline dotted with cranes and scaffolding (in Canada’s case, Toronto), suggests the opposite. Derelict office buildings and boarded-up restaurants aside, many would argue it’s all gone to plan, and Montreal has become a shining light of diversity and French culture in an otherwise Anglo continent. Businesses must answer the phone in French first; multinationals must spend tens of millions reimagining their brands in order not to fall foul of the province’s language police (Starbucks Coffee must have the prefix Café, should people miss what it does. This isn’t the case even in France); and then there are all the other quirky laws that ensure the province of Quebec maintains its special status at vast expense while its infrastructure is crumbling. When Quebec passed its radical language laws in the 1970s and hundreds of thousands of long-time residents headed for the Ontario border, there were many who thought this heavy-handed attempt at language preservation wouldn’t last. Yet Canada’s number two city continues to suffer a serious brain-drain, and even young francophones are becoming vocal about the province’s outmoded world view. For the moment Montreal remains an interesting place because a depressed economy allows creativity to flourish (think Berlin) as low rents mean it’s easier to try out a new retail concept or launch a restaurant. Having done two tours of duty in Montreal (1972-77 and 1980-83), I enjoyed the positive friction that came from Anglo-French sparring and the cosmopolitan flavour it cast over the city. More than 30 years later, the whole concept of language “rules” in an increasingly mobile world is simply unproductive. A recent piece in a Montreal daily politely argued that the city’s problems were related to manufacturing moving overseas and poorly integrated logistics while failing to even aim a dart at the elephant in the room. Multilingualism is a fine concept but it should not be imposed upon long-time residents, new arrivals or businesses seeking to invest — particularly when in Canada there’s another, more widely spoken language.
  10. List of the busiest airports in Canada Passenger traffic 1. Toronto Pearson International Airport Toronto, Ontario 31,507,349 ▲1.7% 2. Vancouver International Airport Vancouver, British Columbia 17,495,049 ▲3.4% 3 Montréal-Pierre Elliott Trudeau International Airport Montreal, Quebec 12,407,934 ▲8.3% 4. Calgary International Airport Calgary, Alberta 12,240,786 ▲8.5% 5. Edmonton International Airport Edmonton, Alberta 6,065,117 ▲16.3% 6. Ottawa Macdonald-Cartier International Airport Ottawa, Ontario 4,090,000 ▲7.4% 7. Winnipeg James Armstrong Richardson International Airport Winnipeg, Manitoba 3,565,501 ▲8.7% 8. Halifax Stanfield International Airport Halifax, Nova Scotia 3,469,062 ▲2.7% 9. Victoria International Airport Victoria, British Columbia 1,481,606 ▲6.6% 10. Kelowna International Airport Kelowna, British Columbia 1,363,239 ▲11.1% . . . Québec - Jean Lesage International Airport Quebec, Quebec 877,000 ▲12.5% Plus d'info sur Montréal ici: Fr: http://admtl.com/a_propos/salle_de_presse/statistiques.aspx More stats on Montreal here: En: http://admtl.com/a_propos/salle_de_presse/statistics.aspx
  11. Burlington,VT Airport Over Philadelphia Over Philadelphia Mexican jungle Coca Cola sponsored street signs Some guy taking it really easy.
  12. Aeroports de Montreal Releases its Fiscal 2006 Results - Passenger traffic up by 5.0% - Revenues increase by 12.5% - EBITDA rises by 13.0% MONTREAL, QUEBEC--(CCNMatthews - March 7, 2007) - Aeroports de Montreal today announced its audited consolidated financial results for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2006. These results are accompanied by data on passenger traffic and aircraft movements at Montreal-Trudeau and Montreal-Mirabel international airports. Highlights EBITDA (excess of revenues over expenses before interest, income taxes, amortization and share in the net gain of investments at equity value) totalled $117.1 million for the year, an increase of $13.5 million, or 13.0%, over fiscal 2005. During fiscal 2006, the Corporation continued work on its various capital investment programs, mainly at Montreal-Trudeau. Work focused on modernization of the domestic jetty and expansion of the domestic arrivals hall, among other areas. In addition, excavation and foundation work progressed for the future transborder departures area and the hotel. The Corporation invested a total of $83.0 million during fiscal 2006, compared to $192.5 million in 2005. Investments in the airports are financed by cash flows from airport operations, including airport improvement fees ($46.7 million), and by long-term debt ($36.3 million). In early October, the International Centre for Settlement of Investment Disputes (ICSID) rendered its decision in the case of the illegal expropriation of Budapest-Ferihegy International Airport on January 1, 2002. The Hungarian government complied with the verdict and paid the agreed amount of $97.7 million Cdn ($83.8 million US). In accordance with existing agreements, Aeroports de Montreal's subsidiary is entitled to 55% of this amount, or $53.7 million Cdn ($46.1 million US). The related accounting gain is reflected in the share in the net gain of investments at equity value, which totals $36.6 million Cdn. Results Consolidated revenues were $285.2 million for fiscal 2006, an increase of $31.8 million, or 12.5%, over the previous year. Aeronautical and commercial revenues were the main contributors to this increase. Operating costs (excluding municipal taxes) were $105.7 million for the year, up $7.6 million or 7.7%, from 2005. This variance is partly due to the normal increase in operating costs following the June 2005 start-up of the new international jetty at Montreal-Trudeau. Municipal taxes were up by 9.6% for the year under review, rising to $34.1 million in fiscal 2006 from $31.1 million in 2005. This increase is attributable to Montreal-Trudeau's higher property valuation following the start-up of the new facilities that are part of the airport expansion program. ADM is the most taxed Canadian airport authority, paying up to four times more per passenger than the other major Canadian airports. Like many other companies, ADM considers EBITDA to be the best indicator for judging the Corporation's ability to meet its financial obligations. EBITDA was $117.1 million for the year under review, against $103.6 million for 2005, an increase of $13.5 million, or 13.0%. Amortization was $72.1 million in 2006, representing an increase of $7.0 million, or 10.8%, over the prior year. This increase is mainly due to the start-up of several new facilities at Montreal-Trudeau, including the international jetty (June 2005), the public international arrivals hall (December 2005) and the new multi-level parking lot (February 2006). Interest on long-term bonds totalled $68.9 million for the period under review, up $18.0 million, or 35.4%, over fiscal 2005. This variance is attributable to a decrease in the amount of capitalized interest on construction in progress, as well as the issuance of a new series of revenue bonds in September 2005. The Corporation reported an excess of revenues over expenses of $19.2 million for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2006, compared with a shortfall of $14.2 million for the prior year, an improvement of $33.4 million. This variance is mainly due to the increase in the share of earnings of Aeroports de Montreal's subsidiary (including the accounting gain resulting from the compensation awarded for the expropriation of Budapest-Ferihegy International Airport) and the higher EBITDA, all of which was offset by the increased financing expenses and amortization. Financial highlights: For the year ended December 31: ------------------------------------------------------------------- (in millions of dollars) 2006 2005 Variance (%) ------------------------------------------------------------------- Revenues 285.2 253.4 12.5 ------------------------------------------------------------------- Operating costs (excluding municipal taxes) 105.7 98.1 7.7 Municipal taxes 34.1 31.1 9.6 Rent paid to Transport Canada 21.8 20.8 4.8 Amortization 72.1 65.1 10.8 Interest on long-term bonds 68.9 50.9 35.4 ------------------------------------------------------------------- Total expenses 302.6 266.0 13.8 ------------------------------------------------------------------- Shortfall of revenues over expenses (before share of investments at equity value) (17.4) (12.6) 38.1 ------------------------------------------------------------------- ------------------------------------------------------------------- Share in the net gain (loss) of investments at equity value 36.6 (1.6) 2,387.5 ------------------------------------------------------------------- Excess (shortfall) of revenues over expenses 19.2 (14.2) 235.2 ------------------------------------------------------------------- ------------------------------------------------------------------- Cash flows from operating activities (before changes in non-cash working capital items) 46.7 49.4 (5.5) ------------------------------------------------------------------- EBITDA 117.1 103.6 13.0 ------------------------------------------------------------------- Passenger traffic Passenger traffic at Montreal-Trudeau increased by 5.0% in 2006, to a new record of 11.4 million passengers enplaned/deplaned. International traffic showed the greatest increase at 6.9%, compared with 4.7% and 3.2% for the domestic and transborder sectors respectively. Passenger traffic ---------------------------------------------------------------- ---------------------------------------------------------------- Aeroports de Montreal 2006 2005 Variance (%) ---------------------------------------------------------------- ---------------------------------------------------------------- January 903,352 895,265 0.9 February 870,153 854,276 1.9 March 997,014 930,222 7.2 ---------------------------------------------------------------- ---------------------------------------------------------------- 1st quarter 2,770,519 2,679,763 3.4 ---------------------------------------------------------------- ---------------------------------------------------------------- April 916,582 860,345 6.5 May 938,606 866,926 8.3 June 999,814 957,146 4.5 ---------------------------------------------------------------- ---------------------------------------------------------------- 2nd quarter 2,855,002 2,684,417 6.4 ---------------------------------------------------------------- ---------------------------------------------------------------- July 1,054,221 1,042,952 1.1 August 1,091,206 1,054,465 3.5 September 976,930 952,257 2.6 ---------------------------------------------------------------- ---------------------------------------------------------------- 3rd quarter 3,122,357 3,049,674 2.4 ---------------------------------------------------------------- ---------------------------------------------------------------- October 940,368 905,132 3.9 November 824,452 756,767 8.9 December 921,372 817,025 12.8 ---------------------------------------------------------------- ---------------------------------------------------------------- 4th quarter 2,686,192 2,478,924 8.4 ---------------------------------------------------------------- ---------------------------------------------------------------- Entire year 11,434,070 10,892,778 5.0 ---------------------------------------------------------------- ---------------------------------------------------------------- Source: Aeroports de Montreal, preliminary figures Aircraft movements There were a total of 235,393 aircraft movements at Aeroports de Montreal in fiscal 2006, representing a 1.5% increase over 2005. Aircraft movements at Montreal-Trudeau rose by 2.5%, to 213,468, while those at Montreal- Mirabel dropped by 7.3%, to 21,925. Aircraft movements ------------------------------------------------------------------- 2006 2005 Variance (%) ------------------------------------------------------------------- Montreal-Trudeau 213,468 208,342 2.5 ------------------------------------------------------------------- Montreal-Mirabel 21,925 23,640 (7.3) ------------------------------------------------------------------- Aeroports de Montreal 235,393 231,982 1.5 ------------------------------------------------------------------- Source: Aeroports de Montreal, preliminary figures
  13. I heard a rumor today in the flight deck and I wanted to see if anyone else had heard it. Apparently FedEx is saturated in Memphis, and they're looking to make another North American Hub....and apparently Mirabel is the choice, or is being considered. I did a search online, with no luck.... Has anyone else heard anything along these lines? Would be the perfect re-birth for the airport.
  14. Didn't know where to post this, but it makes the most sense here... Trudeau Airport was mentioned on Jeopardy last night... here's the link to youtube! http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-hHKgaqL5d8 The category was International Airports... they were given the name of the airport and they had to answer the city it is located in. The category begins at 7:08. Trudeau was worth $1000.
  15. Taken For A Ride In Montreal Warning: Loyal reader ripped off by taxi driver at Montreal Airport. by Wendy Perrin Frequent globehopper Joe_Kayaker reports that he was "taken for a ride" when he landed at Montreal International recently: "It was late in the evening, the shuttle bus to the Airport Novotel had stopped running at 10:00 p.m., and none of the taxis would take me on such a short trip. Grrr. I finally found a taxi driver who would take me. As we were driving to the hotel, he said he didn't understand why the Novotel was called an "airport hotel," since it's not really that close to the airport. We drove for quite a while, and the ride cost $30. When checking into the hotel, I asked how much a cab ride from the airport is supposed to cost and was told, 'No more than $15.' I overpaid by only 15 bucks (well, Loonies), but how does one avoid being taken in by unscrupulous taxi drivers? Thanks, Joe" Joe, you paid $15 in what I call "tourist tax." I've been taken on circuitous routes and overcharged by cab drivers in many a city -- Cairo, Beijing, Moscow, New York -- but I have to say I'm surprised to hear of this occurring in orderly and lawful Montreal. Here's my test-driven advice for avoiding unscrupulous airport cabbies: 1) Ask the hotel in advance how long a taxi ride it is from the airport and what the cost should be. The Hotel Novotel Montreal Aeroport's web site says it's "just 10 minutes" from the airport and provides a map of the route (see left). 2) Before getting into a cab, ask the driver how much the ride will cost. If he quotes a price higher than what the hotel told you, offer your price. Negotiate and reach an agreement before stepping into the cab. 3) When you arrive at your destination, if the driver demands a higher price than was agreed to, ask for a receipt with the driver's name on it, write down his ID number (make known to him that you're recording it), and take out your camera to snap a picture of him and the car. Often, as soon as you pull out the camera, the driver will drop the price. One more thought: If the hotel has a doorman or bellman, see if he can hold the cab while you notify the front desk that you're in the process of being ripped off. I've never done this myself, but I bring it up because a few weeks ago a hotel in Madrid happened to suggest just this. When I called the Tryp Atocha a few days before my arrival in Spain to confirm my online reservation and find out what the length and cost of a cab ride from the airport should be, the front-desk clerk volunteered that if the driver tried to overcharge I should tell the front desk and they would deal with him for me. I got the impression that they had done so for other guests in the past. Hope this helps, Joe. Always good to hear from you. http://www.concierge.com/cntraveler/blogs/perrinpost/2008/04/taken-for-a-rid.html?mbid=rss_cntperrin
  16. Residents take airport grievance to auditor-general Want probe into expansion. Supreme Court nixed coalition's request to launch class-action suit against ADM The Gazette Published: 9 hours ago A coalition of Montreal residents has appealed to the auditor-general to investigate Trudeau Airport and what the coalition sees as unchecked expansion that does not consider impact on the environment or the quality of life of thousands of Montrealers. In a petition delivered yesterday to Sheila Fraser, Citizens for Quality of Life asked for an investigation into grievances that date back to 1995, when flights were transferred from Mirabel to Dorval without, the coalition says, public consultation. Night flights, the loss of green space to airport expansion, an increasing number of flight traffic and noise pollution are all cited in the petition. But like other Canadian airport authorities, Aéroports de Montréal is private and therefore outside the auditor-general's purview. Ghislain Desjardins, a spokesperson in the auditor-general's office, said that while the Dorval airport authority cannot be audited, its 60-year lease with Transport Canada can. However, Desjardins noted, any new audit would not happen immediately. Audit reports of federal departments and crown corporations that are already planned take the office into 2010. The coalition alleges Transport Canada failed to appropriately monitor the environmental clauses in its long-term lease with ADM. Copied to more than 40 elected officials, including Prime Minister Stephen Harper and Federal Transport Minister Lawrence Cannon, the petition targets the $1.5 billion in airport expansions that have taken place since 1996. Luc Marion, president of the coalition representing residents in eight Montreal municipalities, including Dorval, St. Laurent, Lachine and Lasalle, said the group was forced to go to the auditor-general after the Supreme Court of Canada refused to grant its request to launch a class-action lawsuit against ADM. "We are questioning the manner in which ADM has been able to move from Mirabel to Dorval, expand as it has without (looking at) the environmental impact now, 20 and 30 years from now," Marion said. There were 543 daily aircraft movements at Dorval airport in 1995, the year before flights were moved back there from Mirabel, Marion said. By 2007, that number had jumped to 666 a day. Marion said if ADM projections of the airport's growth are accurate, the number would reach 716 by 2010 and 864 by 2015. "We are not going to let another 200 planes fly over our heads a day," Marion said. - - - Dorval's airport is getting busier Daily aircraft movements at Dorval's airport 1966 345 1995 543 2007 666 2010* 716 2015* 864 *Projected figures Source: Citizens for quality of life
  17. The whole blogosphere and media in Canada has said a lot of things about two mayoral elections in two of Canada's major cities the past month. Both of them had the guy expected to come in 3rd place, win the elections with a majority of votes, with high voter turnouts as well. Everyone was surprised because a "progressive", brown, unmarried and Muslim guy won the mayoralty in Calgary (of all places) and a "hyper-conservative" fat white guy won the mayoralty in Toronto, which just shatters everyone's stereotypes of both cities. Some say they should have happened the other way around But it seems that the "progressive" Mr. Nenshi is also quite respectful of the taxpayers, which is always very nice to hear of and would be most welcome in Montreal or any city. He has said he has "a lot in common" with Mr. Ford, and has been trying to find ways to cut spending in his city to reduce a planned property tax hike. So I liked this article: As for Rob Ford, I don't think he has actually become Mayor of Toronto yet or at least has done anything, except meet with all the elected councillors to get to know them. Who said things about "angry politics", he seems like he is actually trying to make the council work An interesting, contemporary TO article: This article about spending by TO city councillors is also illuminating: http://www.nationalpost.com/high+costs+council/3780393/story.html Some highlights: I don't think I even want to know what the books look like for Montreal's city council
  18. Au moins mous sommes pas numéro un. http://jalopnik.com/the-ten-most-wasteful-transportation-projects-in-modern-472052244?utm_source=lifehacker.com&utm_medium=recirculation&utm_campaign=recirculation 4.) Montreal's Airport That's Larger Than Montreal Montreal-Mirabel airport was designed for the Montreal Olympics and it did that job very well. After the Olympics, however, Montreal realized they'd built an airport that was 397 square kilometers in size, bigger than the entire city it served. Now it's mostly empty.
  19. Calgary airport surpasses Montreal, becomes Canada's third busiest By Gina Teel, Calgary Herald YYC, otherwise known as the Calgary International Airport, reported a 2.0 per cent jump in passenger volume in 2008, enough to see it move up to become Canada’s third busiest airport. The increase in passenger traffic in2008 pushed YYC to 12.5 million passengers annually, moving YYC to the third busiest airport in Canada, after Toronto and Vancouver. In 2007, the Calgary International saw 12.2 million passengers, rendering it Canada’s fourth-busiest airport behind Toronto, Vancouver and Montreal. During 2008, the airport welcomed Lufthansa and Mexicana Airlines with new scheduled non-stop service to Frankfurt and Mexico City, respectively, YYC said. Most recently, KLM announced new service to Amsterdam beginning May 2009, increasing passengers’ options for non-stop service to Europe. Garth Atkinson, president and chief executive of the Calgary Airport Authority, said the airport is well positioned to continue to grow and develop as Alberta’s economic gateway to the world. “YYC will continue to move forward with our mandate to focus on growing Calgary International Airport to meet the needs of our growing community and region,” he stated.
  20. Tuesday, July 21, 2009, by Lockhart Curbed.com Concept: bulldoze under Central Park and replace it with a modern, international airport. The idea is so simple, so beautifully elegant, so inevitable that it's hard to believe we didn't think of it ourselves. Rather, credit the shadowy figures behind The Manhattan Airport Foundation, who've worked up an incredibly detailed plan to turn Frederick Law Olmsted's bucolic paradise into a postmodern universe of runways, terminals, and baggage claims. Good news for purists, too: per the Manhattan Airport FAQ, "Whenever possible, vestigial architectural elements of the Park space be retained or reworked into the context of the new design." And they mean it! You've got to admire the Foundation's bravado: "Public dollars helped create Central Park in the 1850s. And public responsibility dictates that we transform this underutilized asset into something we so desperately need today. Manhattan Airport will prove New York City no longer allows it’s vestigial prewar cityscape to languish in irrelevance but instead reinvents these spaces with a daring and inspired bravado truly befitting one of the world’s great cities. The moment is now." Of course it is. (...)