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Found 6 results

  1. http://www.newcitiesfoundation.org/fr-evenements-new-cities-summit/ http://www.newcitiesfoundation.org/new-cities-summit/ New Cities Foundation NEW CITIES SUMMIT The New Cities Summit, our flagship event, is the leading global event on urban innovation. The Summit brings together the top entrepreneurs, innovators, change-makers, CEOs, policy makers, investors and thinkers in this space. Our Next New Cities Summit New Cities Summit Montréal 2016 The Age of Urban Tech http://www.newcitiessummit2016.org Our Past New Cities Summits New Cities Summit Jakarta 2015 Seizing the Urban Moment: Cities at the Heart of Growth and Development http://www.newcitiessummit2015.org Read E-Book Dallas - New Cities Summit 2014 New Cities Summit Dallas 2014 Re-Imagining Cities: Transforming the 21st Century Metropolis http://www.newcitiessummit2014.org Read E-Book São Paulo - New Cities Summit 2013 New Cities Summit São Paulo 2013 The Human City http://www.newcitiessummit2013.org Read E-Book Paris - New Cities Summit 2012 New Cities Summit Paris 2012 Thinking Ahead, Building Together http://www.newcitiessummit2012.org Read E-Book New Cities Foundation Shaping a better urban future Find out more : Our Mission Blog Members Contact Follow Us Facebook Twitter LinkedIn YouTube Sign up to our Newsletter Subscribe © 2016 New Cities Foundation | Credits | Powered by WordPress Sent from my SM-T330NU using Tapatalk
  2. The Global Financial Center Index published by the China Development Institude and Z/Yen partners in London ranks financials centers worlwide based on criterias such as business stability and environnement, technology and assessment by the financial community. Montreal ranks 14th up 1 spot since the last ranking 6 months ago, ahead of cities such as Geneva, Frankfurt or Paris. Highest ranked city in Canada is Toronto in 10th place, London tops chart ahead of New York and Singapore to round top 3. http://www.longfinance.net/images/gfci/gfci_21.pdf
  3. Le Groupe Le Parc is moving ahead with phase 2 of their retirement residences, corner Viau and Jarry. 8 storey building will be erected. The sales office trailer is installed and the signs are up. =================================================================================================
  4. Corruption, petty language fights don’t help Montreal’s “reputation deficit” Charles Lapointe says squabbles over a few English words on menus or in bathrooms are “ridiculous” and are “creating a troubling image of Montreal abroad.” Photograph by: Tourisme Montreal , . Charles Lapointe, president of Tourism Montreal, was uncharacteristically frank this week when he said that petty battles over language are undermining the city’s image. Perhaps it’s because he’s retiring in June that Lapointe was willing to speak out. Squabbles over a few English words on menus or in bathrooms are “ridiculous” and are “creating a troubling image of Montreal abroad,” he said. Lapointe’s remarks are timely because we’ve just been reminded that reputation is vital to a city’s financial health. The Global Financial Centres Index, a measure of how cities rank around the world as places to conduct banking, insurance, investment management and other financial transactions, has just been updated. Montreal ranked 16th in the survey, gaining one spot and finishing behind Toronto and Vancouver, but ranking just ahead of Calgary. It seems Montreal suffers from “a reputation deficit,” according to the survey’s author, Mark Yeandle of London-based Z/Yen Group, who was in town to release the latest findings. He wasn’t referring to language battles, student strikes, crumbling roads or rampant municipal corruption. Rather, he meant that the city’s financial strengths in such areas as investment management and derivatives trading are not well known and need to be promoted. Still, it’s clear that image is everything when it comes to a survey like this and it may not be long before Montreal’s troubles catch up to it. The index doesn’t attempt to measure the dollar value of financial business conducted in each city. Instead, it asks nearly 2,400 financial-services professionals to rate cities on 96 criteria. These are grouped into five main areas: the business environment, infrastructure, market access, availability of talent and cost competitiveness. No surprise that London, New York and Hong Kong hold the top three spots or that Singapore, Zurich and Tokyo follow just behind. North American cities ranking ahead of Montreal are Boston (8), Chicago (11), Toronto (12), San Francisco (13), Washington D.C. (14) and Vancouver (15). Montreal can take some encouragement from the index: it ranks ahead of such cities as Paris and Shanghai. But there are warning signs, too. Those responding to the survey placed a lot of value on such issues as the rule of law and absence of corruption. If Montreal can’t clean up its act in this regard, it may well lose business. The more we learn about the complicity between corrupt municipal officials and big local companies hungry for contracts, the less inviting this city looks as a place to do business. Reputation, the study concludes, is “very important” and “predictability is key.” Montreal, of course, isn’t the only place where there’s concern about such issues. Even top-ranked London has looked bad lately. One banker based in London commented: “London continues to receive bad news — LIBOR (the interest-rate fixing scandal), capping of bonuses, corruption — when will it end and what does it take for London to lose its top spot?” Another area of concern in the survey is taxation. “Simplicity and stability are required,” notes the study. You could take that as a reminder to the Parti Québécois government that its income-tax increases on high-income Quebecers risk making Montreal a less attractive destination for mobile financial jobs. What you have to remember is that the financial industry is a moving target; it’s evolving all the time as new centres, products and technologies emerge. When asked which centres are likely to become more significant down the road, respondents identified Singapore, Shanghai, Hong Kong, Seoul and Toronto as their top five picks for future growth. Clearly, Asia is on the move and Latin American cities are rising, too. It’s an ultracompetitive world and Montreal risks being left behind if it can’t develop its strengths. That’s where we get back to language. English does happen to be the language of international banking and finance; let’s hope that petty bureaucrats and politicians don’t get in the way of anyone wanting to expand here. The city’s French fact is already a great attraction, making Montreal a bridge between North America and Europe. Let’s not forget the importance of the other language in any growth strategy. [email protected] Read more: http://www.montrealgazette.com/Corruption+petty+language+fights+help+Montreal+reputation+deficit/8170678/story.html#ixzz2P5HnPZlL
  5. The Economist doc http://www.citigroup.com/citi/news/2013/130604a.pdf http://globalnews.ca/news/629351/toronto-cracks-top-10-in-world-for-global-appeal/ Toronto cracks top 10 cities in world for ‘global appeal’ It appears Toronto’s preeminent position among Canadian cities is secure until at least 2025. In fact, only nine other centres across the world outrank the city in terms of overall “global appeal” by the mid-point of the next decade, according to a new study on projected competitiveness of cities to attract business, skilled workers and tourists. That puts Toronto ahead of such cosmopolitan centres as Los Angeles, Berlin — even Beijing. New York will continue its reign as the world’s most competitive city, according to the report from the Economist Intelligence Unit that was commissioned by Citibank. Vancouver is the second-highest ranked Canadian city at No. 28 while Montreal placed 36th on the list. Calgary, Ottawa and Edmonton weren’t included in the report which ranked 120 cities across the globe “based on their projected ability to attract capital, business, talent and tourists.” The report assigned scores to a city’s economic strength as well as other factors, like capacity to govern itself and the quality of its infrastructure. Economic strength was the biggest consideration, however, with a 30 percent weighting, followed by “human capital” (skilled workforce, access to education and healthcare) and “institutional character” or a city’s ability “to tax, plan, legislate and enforce rules as well as the degree to which citizens can hold a city’s politicians accountable.” (The data was collected between November 2012 and March, well before certain events could serve to undermine Toronto’s score in the latter category.) Points for physical infrastructure such as airports, transit and access to broadband networks – both wireless and wireline – took up 10 per cent of the score, with another 10 was assigned to the size of the local banking system. Ten per cent went to overall “global appeal” to businesses and individuals abroad. Adding up all scores across the eight assessment categories, Toronto’s score was 64.7 out of 100 (see additional scores below). Still, while the Citi study may be an impressive endorsement, Torontonians may see a small defeat in the rankings. In March, Toronto’s economic development committee trumpeted new data showing the city had overtaken Chicago as the fourth-largest centre on the continent, a statistical symbol that the city’s dynamism and stature was at least even with the U.S. Midwest hub in the eyes of the world. Sitting one spot ahead of Toronto, Chicago appears to still have the edge.