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Found 16 results

  1. Il faut le souligner quand des compagnies d'ici font des acquisitions à l'étranger, comme quoi tout ne va pas d'un seul bord! Boralex boosts France operations with proposed takeover Montreal-based renewable energy producer Boralex Inc. has sharply boosted its presence in France with a $400-million proposed takeover of wind power company Enel Green Power France. The acquisition of the Enel wind portfolio will boost the generating capacity of Boralex’s existing operations by about 25 per cent, with the addition of 12 operating wind farms generating about 186 megawatts of power. Currently, Boralex has wind farms, solar projects, hydroelectric and thermal operations in France, Canada and the United States, that have a total capacity of about 754 MW. The company said this deal will make it the biggest independent wind power producer in France. Adding a large proportion to the French porfolio is a “truly company-transforming move,” said Boralex chief executive officer Patrick Lemaire. Currently, France makes up about 37 per cent of the Boralex portfolio, but that will expand to almost half after this transaction closes in January. Mr. Lemaire said in an interview that growth in the renewable sector is “clearer” in Europe than in North America, at the moment. Changes in Ontario’s renewable energy procurement program that make it less attractive, and limits to Quebec’s plans to acquire clean energy, have made those two core Canadian markets less attractive, he said. “France still has nice objectives,” he said. Boralex is also less interested in expanding in the United States, Mr. Lemaire said, because most jurisdictions there operate with a spot market for electricity, and thus there are fewer long-term contracts that secure a power price over the long term. The wind farms being purchased in this deal have long-term contracts in place averaging about 11 years. Privately owned Enel also has a pipeline of about 310 MW of new wind projects that are not yet built, and that will add further to the Boralex total in the next few years, Mr. Lemaire said. “Our main goals are to operate what we have acquired in the past, build new projects … and add growth for the next few years.” Boralex will finance the Enel purchase through bank loans, an existing revolving credit facility, and a bridge credit facility. It will also sell about $110-million in subscription receipts through a bought-deal transaction arranged by National Bank Financial. http://www.theglobeandmail.com/report-on-business/industry-news/energy-and-resources/boralex-boosts-france-operations-with-proposed-takeover/article22095267/
  2. It's looking like New York will follow fast on the heels of Illinois in deciding not to add a luxury tax for jewelry over $20,000. The American Watch Association sent an e-mail to members on Monday saying that while the New York State Legislature has agreed to tax increases to deal with a budget deficit, the luxury tax proposal is not part of it. The luxury tax would have also applied to aircraft costing more than $500,000, yachts over $200,000, cars that cost more than $60,000 and furs over $20,000. But don't go spending yet, high earners in New York will be feeling an increased pinch. Income taxes were raised one percentage point to 7.85 percent for couples with income over $300,000 and couples with more than $500,000 in income will pay 8.97 percent. The three-year tax increase is expected to add $4 billion to the state coffers this year.
  3. What happens with this skyscraper?¿ Is it a proposal, is it under construction or it was just another cancelled?¿ Please, add information and some renders or piuctures. It was a very interesting art deco builing, a good one for Montreal.
  4. Interesting to see if Air Canada rouge would beat them to the punch. http://www.staradvertiser.com/business/business-breaking/hawaiian-airlines-may-add-more-east-coast-flights-in-2-years/
  5. Si vous pouviez choisir UN gratte-ciel dans le monde ne dépassant pas les alentours des 210m pour respecter la hauteur maximale permise et UN autre de votre choix peu importe la hauteur à ajouter au skyline de Montréal, lesquels seraient-ils? Et surtout, où les installeriez-vous? If you were allowed to choose ONE skyscraper in the world that does not go much over 210m in order to respect the current height restrictions and ONE other skyscraper of any height of your choice to add to the current Montreal skyline, which buildings would you choose? And where would you have them?
  6. (Courtesy of The Guardian UK) I wonder if anyone from the PQ or BQ heard or read about this Probably not seeing they dislike the English language. So I guess Canadian / Quebec history is safe for now, until one of them comes out of their narrow-minded shell and sees this
  7. We just need to add Alaska, Guam, Turks & Caicos and the US Virgin Islands :D It be beautiful. If this ever happened. Guess the White House could be in Texas somewhere or something.
  8. According to Qatar airlines today, they plan on adding additional routes to Montreal next summer. They will be using the 777-300ER with 358 seats. Currently they have 3 flights a week. Does anyone know how many additional flights they will add?
  9. Growing ideas all the way from Montreal Yvonne Michie Horn, Special to The Chronicle Wednesday, August 8, 2007 sfgate_get_fprefs(); Long, cold winters and short summers made Montreal an unlikely mecca for gardeners. Then Flora came to town. In its second year, Flora winds along the banks of a derelict quay in the center-city Old Port district, revealing, in 10 acres of twists and turns, 49 innovative residential gardens matched with 24 "showcase" gardens spotlighting what's new in products, plant materials and design. Towering abandoned grain elevators serve as a backdrop; in the foreground are the shining skyscrapers of downtown. The location in the middle of the city sets the stage for what Flora is all about. The array of gardens on display is designed to inspire urban dwellers with postage-stamp backyards to take a second look at their small outdoor spaces (decks or even rooftops) with the idea of turning them into life-enhancing "green room" extensions of their houses. "These are real gardens, not roped-off gardens to be strolled by," said Raquel Peñalosa, Flora's artistic director. "You can walk into them, linger in them, sit down and visit, pretend they are your own, while giving thought to how the ideas presented might be adapted to your spaces at home." Once Flora 2007 ends, Peñalosa and Flora's artistic committee will be looking at proposals from landscape architects who want to be included next year. "We look for sustainability with an aesthetic edge, usefulness and originality," Peñalosa said, adding that from the start, Flora received proposals from as far away as Europe and Australia. Unlike most garden shows - installed for "here today, gone tomorrow" impact - Flora is on display for Montreal's entire growing season, from mid-June into September, offering repeat visitors the opportunity to see gardens mature and change, just as they would at home. Color rules the day, from a lineup of gigantic orange flowerpots and orange benches at the entrance to the color coding of the garden's seven themed sections: city, nature, slope, nurturing, rooftop, avant-garde and street-side. A long, bright red table flanked with matching stools turns the space at No. 13, "Feast," into a dining room set in the midst of planting beds that pay more attention to edibles than flowers. Garden No. 17, "Emerald Enchantment," has a deck painted a startling lime green, scattered with orange beanbag chairs and topped with an orange canopy. Multicolor Plexiglas disks atop tall rods at No. 35, "Earth and Sky," turn the light-colored gravel underneath into colorful polka dots when the sun shines through. I made a mental note to consider adding bold color when contemplating a backyard face-lift. Other thought-provoking themes emerged as I walked Flora's paths: -- Forget the separate vegetable patch; plant edibles with the flowers. It is the rare Flora garden that has not done so. One example harnesses a seemingly haphazard assortment of tomatoes, herbs, peppers, parsley and more with a border of euphorbia 'Diamond Frost' and orange marigolds. The idea appears to have quickly jumped out of Flora into Montreal's heart - the median strip dividing the busy four lanes of Boulevard Rene-Lévesque in front of Montreal's venerable Fairmont Queen Elizabeth Hotel intersperses its shrubs and flowers with rainbow Swiss chard. -- Furniture is the key to enjoying outdoor space. Every Flora display garden includes seating of some sort, not just placed for a visitor's contemplative convenience but also incorporated into the design. One unforgettable setting duplicates a living room - traditional sofa, coffee table, deep armchairs - but all carved from stone. They're surprisingly comfortable and undeniably weatherproof. -- Make use of indigenous perennials. Easy to grow and modest consumers of water and fertilizer, they introduce authentic, creative and sustainable solutions to the landscape. -- Think of annuals as accents. Allow shrubs and perennials to become the backbone of the garden. Add annuals sparingly for quick seasonal color. -- Repetition adds unity. Instead of sticking in a couple of these and those here and there, achieve impact with the massing of material - three-deep rows of a single variety of grass, an entire bed filled with Russian sage. -- Add art. Such additions as a single large piece of sculpture, a scattering of colored-glass baubles or a mounted "window" of stained glass add individuality and impact. -- Create private spaces with screens. Flora's gardens offer screening ideas using both permanent dividers, such as walls of stone, and those that are movable, making use of such materials as woven slats of lightweight wood or strung-together canes of bamboo. An easy low-cost suggestion is a stretched cloth banner. -- Think about planting up. Space-saving lattices are not only for roses and morning glories but are also ideal for climbing edibles such as tomatoes, cucumbers, gourds, melons and beans. It is not too late to visit Flora this year, and it's not too early to mark calendars for next summer - and, for a complete Canadian garden experience, to consider getting there by train. ViaRail Canada has put together a cross-country garden route that begins in Victoria, British Columbia, and ends up 16 spectacular gardens later in Halifax, Nova Scotia. Montreal and Flora, of course, are a must-stop along the way. Flora's flora French-speaking people in Montreal call them "Les Exceptionnels," plants voted as exceptional by Flora's designers and visiting public: Zinnia 'Profusion,' deep apricot, blooms repeatedly, easily grown from seed. Cleome 'Señorita Rosalita,' vivid pink blooms against dark, green foliage. Rudbeckia 'Irish Spring,' rich, golden blossoms with green central cones. Pansy 'Karma Denim,' large deep-blue flowers blotched with yellow. Scaveola 'Diamond,' graceful and compact with fanlike clusters of lilac and white. Celosia 'Fresh Look,' flower stems up to 10 inches, never needs deadheading. Begonia 'Solenia Cherry,' semi-trailing. Penstemon 'Phoenix Red,' orderly and brilliant. Anigozanthos 'Kanga Red,' also known as kangaroo paws, are attractive to bees and butterflies. Euphorbia 'Diamond Frost,' mannerly border plant with a white froth of blossom. For information www.floramontreal.ca/en/index.asp . For ViaRail's garden itinerary, (888) 842-7245; for general information and booking, www.viarail.ca . Yvonne Michie Horn is a travel and garden writer. E-mail her at [email protected]
  10. Today is a day like any other. I got up, got into my car and drove to work. While driving I noticed the unbelievable price increase at the pump!! From about $1.26 yesterday to $1.35 this morning. The barrel price dropped to about $78 this morning and these S.O.B.S. have the balls to increase the price. About 2 or 3 years ago when the barrel hit $147 the price of the liter peaked at about $1.50. Today our CDN $ has gained parity with the US greenback (approx. a 4 or 5% gain from 2 years ago) the barrel is at $78 and they have the audacity to raise the price and the governments say squat!!...Come on enough is enough!! And our Mayor Tremblay wants to add new fuel taxes !!! Holy cow!! :stirthepot::stirthepot:
  11. Does New York City Need More Taxis? The City of New York is planning to add 2,000 more yellow taxi cabs onto its streets. They'll be wheelchair accessible and raise a bunch of money for the city. The new licenses could fetch up to $1 billion at auction. And the hope is that the extra taxis will make life better for the many New Yorkers without cars. Charles Komanoff disagrees. The transport economist has been analyzing the city's traffic patterns for almost 40 years. He argues that putting more cabs on the streets will actually slow down traffic — so much so that it would cost travelers not just time but also money. True, it would be easier to find a cab. But Komanoff argues that all those extra cabs would slow down traffic by 12 percent in the city. And they wouldn't just slow down traffic for their passengers. They would slow it down delivery trucks, buses, private cars — everyone. Komanoff has been collecting data about New York City's traffic patterns in a massive spreadsheet. In the data you can find every lane on every road in the heart of Manhattan. He calls his data trove the Balanced Transport Analyzer. He figures the slowdown due to the new cabs would cost the city $500 million a year in lost time. We'll have to wait to see if Komanoff's predictions will come true. The decision to add more cabs in New York is now being challenged in court. http://www.npr.org/blogs/money/2012/07/31/157477611/does-new-york-city-need-more-taxis
  12. December 19th, 2011 Confessions of a Condo Architect By Alanah Heffez // 7 Comments http://spacingmontreal.ca/page/7/ Right after completing her Masters degree in Architecture, Alex got a job with a local firm that designs those condominiums you always see cropping up in the Plateau, Rosemont and Villeray. We have all seen these new constructions and shuddered, or perhaps just sighed it could be worse. The blocks are neither offensive nor inspiring: they're mediocre at best. “We’re creating a generation of condos that are really ugly," Alex says,"It’s as bad as the 'eighties. Frankly, I think it’s going to be worse.” She runs through a list of all-too-familiar features: cramped juliettes where balconies should be; basement apartments with dug-out cours anglaises surrounded with bars that end up looking like jail cells; the use of different tones of brick to break up the façade; the random insertion of incongruous colours to add a semblance of architectural variety... As Alex describes it, designing condos is a constant give and take between respecting the building code while maximizing the client's profits that leaves little space for creativity. Here's an example: the City of Montreal requires 80% of building fronts to be masonry and monotone bricks in taupe matt, grey anthracite and Champlain orange-red are inexpensive (how cheap it feels to reduce the urban landscape to colours in a catalogue). The most an architect can hope to do is to add a splash of coloured plexiglass, and only if the borough's CCU lets it through. Within the envelope, the constraints are event tighter: Alex describes her workdays as "trying to shove too much into a space that’s inherently too small.” She recalls debating with a colleague about the ethics of sketching a double-bed into the plans when a queen simply wouldn't fit in the room. "'If you can’t fit a Queen-sized bed in your apartment, then it’s not an acceptable apartment," Alex insists. But most people don't have much experience reading architectural plans so they don’t necessarily realize what they’re getting. The developer, on the other hand, knows exactly what they want: "they come to you and say: this is the lot, and we want 8 condos in it." That leaves room for only a couple two-bedroom apartments, and the rest bachelors, all within the footprint of what was once a duplex or triplex apartment block. "It’s more profitable to sell more condos than to sell more bedrooms,” Alex points out. There's another catch: buildings under three stories fall within part 9 of the building code, which is more lenient in terms of fire safety regulations. But by sinking in a couple basement suites and adding a mezzanine (which must not exceed a certain percentage of the floorspace), it's possible to squeeze five levels into a building that is officially only three stories high. At least there's a sliver of good news: just this year the city stopped allowing windowless rooms. And while we may be in favour of urban density, tightly-packed residential units are not synonymous with density of inhabitants. "All these properties with great potential are being turned into one single type of real estate that is not family friendly: it’s all geared to young professionals without children. They’re not big enough for a growing family and there’s no flexibility in the space," says Alex. Another thing that she laments is that, with the requirement to transform every square inch of the lot into square-footage of floorspace, there's a tendency to lose the individual entrances, balconies and outdoor staircases that are typical of Montreal's urban landscape, and that create a dialogue between public and private space. Of course, being an architect, she also dwells on the aesthetics: “It’s all going to look very 2010," she sighs, "....and not in a good way.”
  13. What would you do? show me your plans! It can be no more than 10 stations long.
  14. Read more: http://www.thestar.com/news/world/article/1247988---cheap-quebec-customers-hit-by-special-tax-in-burlington-vt-restaurants Cute Thing is, how can you tell someone by their accent? When I go to Vermont, people think I am a local because I sound like them, but if I am somewhere else in the US, people know I am not from around there.
  15. L'année 2009 devrait voir un nombre reccord de faillites partout dans le monde: http://www.marketwatch.com/news/story/More-Tribunes-Lehmans-likely-coming/story.aspx?guid={F40FA856-6FE7-4A28-82B0-6729F7E57CB5}
  16. une des plus grandes banques américaines se dirige dangereusement vers une faillite.