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Found 6 results

  1. New York City fears return to 1970s Tue Jan 27, 2009 By Joan Gralla http://www.reuters.com/article/newsO...50Q6IH20090127
  2. There was another thread with an old picture of a Citroen DS parked next to the Sun Life building, circa 1971. I forget the thread though. Here's an ad with the same car driving around Montreal! The license plate looks like a 1968 Quebec plate (white on blue). It sure doesn't look like any 1970's plate, and DS/Citroen Canada stopped around 1974... Another one but less memorable city views:
  3. Le 22 octobre 2009 Les bâtiments les plus laids du monde Les créations architecturales ne font pas toujours l'unanimité, et la Tour Eiffel, en son temps, fut rejetée par de nombreux Parisiens. Parfois, le public a raison, a décrété le magazine Travel & Leisure, qui a élaboré la liste des bâtiments les plus laids du monde. Quatre continents et toutes sortes de bâtiments publics sont représentés dans le classement. On y trouve des hôtels, des bibliothèques, des cathédrales et des salles de concert. Tous les lecteurs du magazine ne sont pas d'accord, comme Charliegeo qui commente: «Tous ces bâtiments sont géniaux. Si j'avais été en vacances dans n'importe laquelle de ces localités, ce sont des bâtiments que j'aurais pris en photo. Je suppose que je suis simplement quelqu'un qui apprécie la création qui sort des sentiers battus.» Voici le palmarès des bâtiments les plus laids du monde, selon Travel & Leisure: ---------------------------------------------------------- The Ryugyong Hotel, Pyongyang, North Korea (2010) Secret Intelligence Service (SIS) Building, London, UK (1995) Harold Washington Library, Chicago, USA (1991) The Obelisk, Puerto Maldonado, Peru Longaberger Home Office, Newark, OH, USA Portland Building, Portland, USA (1982) The Fang Yuan Building, Shenyang, China (2001) Bolwoningen Houses, Hertogenbosch, Netherlands (1970s) National Library, Minsk, Belarus (2006) “The UFO House,” Sanjhih, Taiwan (1970s) The Ideal Palace, Hauterives, France (1800s) Metropolitan Cathedral, Liverpool, England (1967) The Experience Music Project, Seattle, USA (2000)
  4. Roman Bezjak Roman Bezjak, who was born in Slovenia but was raised in West Germany, set out to document the everyday qualities of communist buildings. Once the Ministry of Road Construction, this building in Tbilisi, Georgia, consists of five intersecting horizontal bars and resembles a Jenga game. It was designed to has as small a footprint on the ground as possible and to allow natural life to flourish. Now it houses the Bank of Georgia. Roman Bezjak Pictured here is a Cold War-era commercial complex in Leipzig, eastern Germany. Bezjak wants viewers to approach his photos "with a gaze uncontaminated by ideology." Roman Bezjak Nemiga Street in the Belarusian capital Minsk, where an old church still stands in the old city core, between two monstrosities of postwar modernism. Bezjak made repeated trips to Eastern Europe over a period spanning five years. Roman Bezjak Prefabricated apartment blocks in St. Petersburg, Russia. Bezjak wanted to show the buildings from eye level, the way local citizens would have seen them every day. Roman Bezjak A patriotic mosaic on the National History Museum in Tirana, Albania, built in 1981. Roman Bezjak This massive 1970s government building in the eastern German city of Magdeburg become a department store after 1991. Roman Bezjak The "three widows" in Belgrade, Serbia -- three massive apartment blocks. Roman Bezjak Bezjak's book has collected photos of post-war architecture from countries including Poland, Lithuania, Serbia, Hungary, Ukraine and Georgia. Roman Bezjak The 12-story building in the middle is a three-star hotel -- the "Hotel Cascade" -- in the Czech city of Most. Roman Bezjak This publishing house in Sarajevo, Bosnia, looks like a spaceship. It shows signs of damage from the war. "It was near Snipers' Alley," Bezjak recalls -- a street in the Serbian capital that received its nickname during the Balkan wars. Roman Bezjak An earthquake in 1963 gave city planners in the Macedonian capital of Skopje the chance to envision an "ideal city" in concrete. The city's main post office could be from a science fiction movie. Roman Bezjak A department store in the Ukrainian city of Dnipropetrovsk. Roman Bezjak The center of Dresden, where a state department store built in the 1970s was meant to be the height of modernity. The building was torn down in 2007. Roman Bezjak A dinosaur of communism: The roof of the sports hall in Kosovo's capital Pristina looks like the back of a stegosaurus. Built in 1977, it's still in use for athletic events and concerts. Roman Bezjak The Polish port city of Gdansk has prefabricated apartment blocks from the 1960s and 1970s that are supposed to look like waves from the nearby Baltic Sea. Called "wave houses," they take up whole city blocks. The largest is 850 meters long and is said to be the third-longest apartment building in Europe. Roman Bezjak For Bezjak, these buildings are not just relics of a failed system, but also, simply, home. "That can't be measured according to aesthetic or social categories, but only in terms of memories," he says. This photo shows the city of Halle in eastern Germany. Bezjak's photographs repeatedly met with incomprehension from Eastern European colleagues. "They can't understand why anyone would focus on this phenomenon," Bezjak says. Roman Bezjak's book "Sozialistische Moderne - Archäologie einer Zeit" is published by Hatje Cantz Verlag, 2011, 160 pages. http://www.spiegel.de/international/zeitgeist/0,1518,777206,00.html
  5. August 7 to September 29, Quartier des Spectacles hosts an exhibition by Gabor Szilasi, a major figure in Canadian and Quebec photography. His elegant portrait of Sainte-Catherine Street in the 1970s includes 27 photos. At the corner of Clark and Ste. Catherine W.
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