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Found 6 results

  1. Pay what you want in this Montreal restaurant PETER MCCABE FOR THE TORONTO STAR Crescent St. tavern hard hit by drop in business tries something new Feb 25, 2009 04:30 AM Andrew Chung QUEBEC BUREAU CHIEF MONTREAL – Already stung by a slide in American tourists and a deepening financial mess that's keeping business customers away, the Taverne Crescent, situated on one of Montreal's historic party streets, decided to implement a new policy: Pay what you can. So yesterday, lunch-hour customers were given the choice of an appetizer, plus either tagliatelle bolognese, salmon or braised beef, and coffee or tea, for whatever they wanted to pay. For a dollar even. Or nothing. "Some people might pay nothing," said owner George Pappas, "but maybe when they have more money in three or six months, they'll come back and pay more." Desperate times call for desperate measures, it seems. Pappas's actions, though gimmicky, illustrate the darkening picture for all those attached to the tourism industry in the province. Despite the proximity of major Canadian cities like Montreal to the border, the number of American tourists coming into Canada by car – still the vast majority compared to other means of transport – reached a record low last year, data from Statistics Canada show. There were nearly 10 million of those trips in 2001. Last year, just 7.4 million. It wasn't even that bad during the last two recessions, including the oil shock of the 1970s. Meanwhile, Americans are taking 1.3 million fewer trips to Quebec compared to 2001. That number, which includes same-day trips, is off by nearly half Canada-wide. "It's astounding," said Statistics Canada analyst Paul Durk, "these are very big drops." There are a number of reasons why the Americans are staying away. New border security requirements, the perception of long border wait times, and even cross-border shopping may be less attractive for aging baby boomers, Durk suggested. Overall, there is a growing fear for the coming year, particularly since the recession has gone global. Already, there has been a sharp decrease in tourism from Britain and soon the rest of Europe will follow. "It will affect big cities the most," said Pierre Bellerose, vice-president of Tourism Montreal. "The cities get more international clients." In the last few years, the American malaise has been offset by increases in tourism from Europe and Mexico. And Montreal's hotels were saved last year by a strong convention calendar. But this year will be different. Bellerose said they're expecting the tourism sector to decline 2 to 3 per cent overall. Quebec's government has stepped in. On Sunday, Tourism Minister Nicole Ménard announced she's giving $4.2 million in financial help to certain businesses and groups, such as Aventure Écotourisme Québec, to try to pump up the tourist volume, and, a spokesperson said, to get past the economic crisis. It won't be easy. The horizon is bleak. Last year, there were 336 restaurant bankruptcies, the Association des restaurateurs du Québec reports – a 20 per cent increase from the year prior. Pappas, who also owns a nightclub in Montreal, describes having to cut staff in response to the American tourist decline. And until his bright idea to "pay what you can," his Taverne Crescent was closed on Mondays and Tuesdays because it was losing money. With no Formula One Grand Prix in Montreal this summer, he said, "It's going to be worse!" http://www.thestar.com/article/592677#Comments
  2. http://www.euromonitor.com/Trend_Watch_Euromonitor_Internationals_Top_City_Destinations_Ranking Euromonitor International’s Top City Destinations Ranking La liste, qui concerne les touristes internationaux, ressemble environ à ça... Top City Destinations Ranking 2007 '000 arrivals - Ranking - 000 tourist arrivals - % growth 2006/2007 London 1 15,340 -1.9 Hong Kong 2 12,057 8.8 Bangkok 3 10,844 4.8 Singapore 4 10,284 5.4 Paris 5 8,762 -10.2 New York City 6 7,646 23.0 Toronto 7 6,627 -3.6 Dubai 8 6,535 6.8 Istanbul 9 6,454 21.8 Rome 10 6,123 1.5 Barcelona 11 5,044 7.4 Seoul 12 4,994 1.5 Shanghai 13 4,800 11.2 Dublin 14 4,627 4.4 Kuala Lumpur 15 4,403 0.8 Pattaya 16 4,387 5.3 Mecca 17 4,200 10.5 Moscow 18 4,050 9.6 Macau 19 3,953 28.7 Amsterdam 20 3,909 0.2 Beijing 21 3,900 8.5 Cairo 22 3,896 10.0 Prague 23 3,696 -0.2 Vienna 24 3,637 4.5 Madrid 25 3,404 12.1 Guangzhou 26 3,300 31.4 Phuket 27 3,160 9.9 Vancouver 28 3,127 -0.9 Montreal 29 2,736 -5.0 Shenzen 30 2,700 41.8 Ho Chi Minh 31 2,700 14.8 Los Angeles 32 2,652 5.5 Rio De Janeiro 33 2,627 10.1 Mexico City 34 2,560 -6.3 Berlin 35 2,552 10.5 Mumbai 36 2,436 11.9 Tokyo 37 2,422 13.8 Miami 38 2,341 18.7 Brussels 39 2,328 2.6 Athens 40 2,300 7.9 Buenos Aires 41 2,286 9.0 San Francisco 42 2,270 13.9 Warsaw 43 2,210 9.8 Baii 44 2,183 13.0 Budapest 45 2,119 3.7 St Petersburg 46 2,100 10.0 Munich 47 2,098 8.9 Orlando 48 2,055 3.1 Cancún 49 2,022 27.2 Delhi 50 1,920 11.9 Milan 51 1,914 0.7 Hangzhou 52 1,900 21.7 Sydney 53 1,869 0.9 Lisbon 54 1,863 8.6 Ryad 55 1,798 3.4 Venice 56 1,798 1.9 Johannesburg 57 1,739 23.9 Florence 58 1,729 0.8 Las Vegas 59 1,720 4.4 Jerusalem 60 1,610 1.7 Marrakech 61 1,600 6.7 Chiang Mai 62 1,584 -4.8 Honolulu 63 1,553 -10.4 Calgary 64 1,546 0.8 Frankfurt/Main 65 1,542 0.1 Zurich 66 1,418 3.6 Cape Town 67 1,374 3.8 Suzhou 68 1,350 5.0 Abu Dhabi 69 1,340 21.5 Zhuhai 70 1,340 1.6 Varadero 71 1,326 -8.4 Edinburgh 72 1,320 -1.3 São Paulo 73 1,307 19.3 Ha Noi 74 1,306 9.8 Copenhagen 75 1,300 -5.4 Nice 76 1,235 0.6 Tel Aviv 77 1,225 9.1 Washington DC 78 1,195 12.6 Manchester 79 1,180 29.4 Palma de Mallorca 80 1,172 -4.9 Chicago 81 1,147 8.0 Guilin 82 1,094 7.1 Boston 83 1,075 7.9 Bucuresti 84 1,073 2.2 Lima 85 1,063 18.0 Stockholm 86 1,063 6.0 Alexandria 87 1,013 4.6 Krakow 88 1,012 2.0 Rotterdam 89 1,009 -0.6 Luxor 90 1,009 5.8 Birmingham 91 970 24.5 Sharjah 92 970 5.1 Tallinn 93 965 -3.5 Cuzco 94 960 20.0 Melbourne 95 954 3.4 La Habana 96 943 -1.1 Osaka 97 937 13.8 Helsinki 98 903 7.3 Santiago 99 886 5.0 Lyon 100 869 2.2 Sevilla 101 865 -1.5 Tianjin 102 855 0.7 Nanjing 103 853 1.2 Salzburg 104 851 -2.7 Manila 105 839 8.0 Xi'an 106 810 1.2 Qingdao 107 803 1.0 Xiamen 108 800 1.0 Kyoto 109 788 13.8 Cebu 110 773 33.0 Cologne 111 768 1.1 Hamburg 112 754 2.1 Glasgow 113 743 0.3 Yakarta 114 740 12.7 Granada 115 738 4.2 Geneve 116 722 5.6 Poznan 117 683 25.8 Dalian 118 679 1.9 Mombasa 119 677 12.0 Valencia 120 670 16.5 Ras Al-Khaimah 121 660 7.6 Salvador de Bahia 122 650 0.6 San Diego 123 645 -0.8 Bruges 124 644 0.5 Chiba 125 639 13.8 Antwerp 126 636 0.1 Düsseldorf 127 632 0.4 Liverpool 128 627 0.3 Bogota 129 617 13.5 Kunming 130 615 1.3 Casablanca 131 610 6.7 Kolkata 132 609 11.9 Wuxi 133 606 1.9 Porto 134 603 9.0 Gdansk 135 600 7.1 Nairobi 136 598 12.0 Foz do Iguacu 137 588 18.0 Chongquing 138 568 4.2 Innsbruck 139 556 3.8 Florianópolis 140 516 64.5 Chengdu 141 514 1.1 Oslo 142 513 9.9 Leeds 143 510 74.7 Göteborg 144 497 1.3 Jaipur 145 492 11.9 Houston 146 478 5.0 Atlanta 147 478 0.3 Bristol 148 470 16.6 Bratislava 149 462 1.5 Oxford 150 450 0.2 Dubrovnik 151 449 7.4 Yokohama 152 448 13.8 Lucerne 153 447 0.5 Zagreb 154 432 11.1 San Jose 155 430 4.4 Quito 156 429 60.0 Goa 157 428 11.9 Luxembourg City 158 427 5.0 Aix-en-Provence 159 410 32.0 Reykjavik 160 407 9.7 Seattle 161 406 24.9 Tangier 162 393 6.7 Caracas 163 391 -10.0 Lille 164 384 1.4 Naples 165 381 -1.6 York 166 370 46.2 Stuttgart 167 363 1.3 Belgrade 168 360 2.7 Dallas 169 358 3.5 Fortaleza 170 358 1.5 Cardiff 171 356 0.3 Ljubljana 172 354 6.0 Nürnberg 173 352 -1.3 Cambridge 174 350 0.6 Montevideo 175 349 10.0 Monaco 176 343 9.6 Fès 177 342 6.7 Kamakura 178 332 13.8 Basel 179 319 1.3 Newcastle-upon-Tyne 180 319 0.6 Pune 181 316 11.9 Palermo 182 316 1.0 Sapporo 183 315 13.8 Rabat 184 305 6.7 Rhodes 185 296 2.1 Córdoba 186 290 14.6 Verona 187 289 1.9 Rimini 188 284 1.2 Málaga 189 282 4.5 Bologna 190 279 1.6 Ghent 191 278 6.6 Fukuoka 192 265 13.8 Brighton 193 264 -0.4 Dijon 194 262 8.4 La Paz 195 255 4.0 Inverness 196 253 0.4 Reims 197 249 10.1 Bath 198 247 0.8 Genua 199 243 1.5 Heidelberg 200 240 -2.1 Alicante 201 240 10.1 Turin 202 240 -2.2 Blackpool 203 230 -2.2 Bilbao 204 230 15.6 Dresden 205 230 1.3 Udaipur 206 221 11.9 Nottingham 207 218 -0.5 Lausanne 208 215 0.1 Santiago de Compostela 209 215 18.5 Strasbourg 210 214 1.7 Stavenger 211 213 16.3 Thessalloniki 212 213 4.9 Graz 213 210 2.0 Bergen 214 209 11.1 Bern 215 203 1.6 Reading 216 203 0.5 Shefield 217 200 0.8 Linz 218 200 0.2 Aberdeen 219 196 0.5 Bordeaux 220 195 1.0 Avignon 221 186 2.2 Marseille 222 185 2.8 Rethymnon 223 181 1.7 Lugano 224 176 0.7 Zaragoza 225 170 5.7 San Sebastian 226 169 1.1 Siena 227 163 0.6 Tarragona 228 161 4.5 Trondheim 229 150 8.7 Agra 230 150 11.9 World Tourism Organisation, European Cities Tourism, National Statistics, National Tourist Boards, Local Tourism & Convention Bureaux, Trade Press (local and national newspapers, business travel news), Euromonitor International Mainland China cities exclude visits from Hong Kong and Macao (and vice versa), but include visitors from Taiwan
  3. New York set to ban cars from Times Square NEW YORK, May 24 (UPI) -- Many New York residents and tourists alike say the city's plan to ban cars from traveling through Times Square is a great idea. The New York Daily News said Saturday some people have applauded the plan to ban all traffic from Broadway between 42nd and 47th Street in Times Square starting Sunday night. "I think it's going to bring more people and they'll be more comfortable," local food vendor John Galanopolous said of the plan, which will also ban cars from 33rd and 35th Street in Herald Square. Pittsburgh resident Bill Buettin agreed the traffic ban in those areas would make pedestrian travel easier in New York. "Not having to worry about crosswalks and stop lights makes it that much easier," the tourist told the Daily News. But at least one New York resident was less than supportive of the plan, which he feels could hinder the city's numerous motorists. "There's going to be more traffic. It's not going to work," taxi driver Rafi Hassan told the Daily News. "Most of our customers are here."
  4. Publié le 07 avril 2009 à 10h01 | Mis à jour à 10h03 Tomorrow's Tourist: Où irons-nous dans 20 ans? Le Burj Al Arab hôtel, à Dubaï. Isabelle Audet La Presse Ian Yeoman a lancé Tomorrow's Tourist, un livre dans lequel il se risque à prévoir où en sera le voyage en 2030. Le futurologue et professeur à l'Université Victoria, à Wellington, y présente une vision plutôt optimiste du tourisme de demain. «Toutes proportions gardées, de plus en plus de personnes vont voyager dans 20 ans, explique-t-il. La crise économique ou les changements climatiques ne devraient pas y changer grand-chose. Historiquement, l'homme s'est toujours adapté. Il va voyager, mais différemment.»Pendant plusieurs années, le professeur s'est penché sur les données touristiques passées et présentes de dizaines de destinations touristiques. Il les a recoupées avec d'autres statistiques comme l'évolution du revenu des ménages et les changements dans la structure des familles. À la lumière de ces chiffres, il croit notamment que la Chine deviendra la première destination touristique mondiale avant 2030 et que le tourisme en Europe se déplacera vers l'est, concentré autour de la mer Adriatique. Il dégage aussi des tendances qui s'accentueront au cours des prochaines décennies: le grantravelling - les grands-parents voyageant avec leurs petits-enfants, les voyages en profondeur sur plusieurs mois, et, à l'opposé, la disneylandification du tourisme. Les adultes auront, prévoit-il, un besoin croissant d'escapades pour s'éclater, magasiner, et se laisser aller à des frivolités. Dubaï, Las Vegas et Macao répondront encore plus à cette demande. L'auteur croit qu'un même touriste pourrait avoir envie de s'amuser une semaine dans les casinos de Macao, et ensuite de planifier un voyage humanitaire au Gabon. «La clé, c'est la diversification du tourisme, explique-t-il. Les Américains changent leur coupe de cheveux en moyenne à tous les 18 mois: ils aiment le changement, tout comme la plupart des Occidentaux.» Ces prévisions sont-elles réalistes? Tout à fait, croit Michèle Laliberté, analyste au Réseau de veille de la Chaire de tourisme Transat de l'ESG UQAM. «Nous ne nous sommes jamais hasardés sur cette avenue-là, mais il y a quand même beaucoup de phénomènes qui sous-tendent les affirmations du livre de M. Yeoman.» L'analyste confirme aussi qu'en période d'incertitude économique, l'industrie touristique se montre friande de telles prédictions. «Toute l'industrie touristique du Québec voudrait avoir une boule de cristal, constate-t-elle. On se rend compte que les Américains nous boudent de plus en plus et on cherche à les attirer. Avec les vols directs de plus en plus longs, le Canada devient un choix parmi une liste mondiale. La question, c'est de savoir comment se démarquer.»
  5. MONTREAL - Montreal must be the bad-news capital of Canada. That’s the impression I got from an email I received last Saturday from Jean-François Dumas, the president of a Montreal-based media-monitoring service, Influence Communication. Dumas was responding to my column in Saturday’s Gazette. In the column, I speculated that negative publicity outside Quebec about the Pastagate affair may be a factor in what so far has been a disappointing summer tourist season in Montreal. “Pastagate” refers to the furor last February over the unsuccessful attempt by Quebec’s French-language-protection agency to force a Montreal restaurant to add French translations to the Italian names of dishes on its menu. As I mentioned in my column, Dumas’s firm reported less than a week after the story broke that Pastagate had become the subject of 350 articles in 14 countries as far away as Australia, and many more articles in Canada. Dumas’s firm started monitoring media coverage in 2000, And he said in his email that for the first several years, it found that Quebec received “softball” (bonbon) coverage in the international media. Most of it, 58 per cent, was about either Quebec’s culture or its tourist attractions. “The foreign press essentially praised Quebec for its European character, its dining, its hospitality and its cultural richness and dynamism. “The foreign press essentially praised Quebec for its European character, its dining, its hospitality and its cultural richness and dynamism. “It was even said often that Montreal was an ‘incubator for cultural products and ideas.’ “The only criticism addressed to Quebec concerned its exploitation and exportation of asbestos to developing countries.” That began to change early last year, during the disruptive and sometimes violent student protests against the former Liberal government’s university-fee increases. In the last 18 months, said Dumas, a series of events had “considerably changed” Quebec’s image in the foreign media. “In fact, one might even say that Quebec has become one big news story” in itself — and a mostly negative one. Dumas listed a “Top 15” of the Quebec stories that received the most coverage in international media since the beginning of 2012 (see accompanying list). Except for the papal candidacy of Quebec City Cardinal Marc Ouellet, most of the stories were negative. (Pastagate ranked No. 11). And most of them were linked to Montreal. If that doesn’t make Montreal the bad-news capital of Canada, I don’t know what is. I can’t think of another Canadian city that has produced nearly as many big, negative news stories in the same period. The mayor of Toronto is alleged to have smoked crack? Pfft. The actual arrest of Montreal’s mayor only made it to No. 8 on Dumas’s list. A police raid at Montreal city hall just cracked the list at No. 15. In a demonstration of the media version of Gresham’s law in economics, the bad coverage of Montreal has driven out the good. Dumas noted that in the past 18 months, Quebec’s cultural and tourist attractions have lost 65 per cent of their share of international media coverage. And, he concluded, the damage to the images of Quebec in general and Montreal in particular is not good for their economies. “If one accepts that a city, a province or a country is a bit like a brand in foreign media, and that the interest of others helps generate tourism, immigration and investments, I believe that we should seriously question ourselves about the state of our collective assets.” Montreal hoteliers might agree. The latest figures obtained from the Hotel Association of Greater Montreal show that last month, compared with July 2011, the number of nightly room occupations in its 77 member hotels in the metropolitan region was down by 40,000. Top 15 Quebec news stories by volume of international media coverage since January 2012 (Source: Influence Communication) 1. Lac-Mégantic disaster 2. Magnotta case 3. Student protests 4. Helicopter jailbreak 5. Charbonneau inquiry and corruption 6. Quebec papal candidate 7. Metropolis shooting 8. Arrest of Montreal mayor Applebaum 9. Gatineau shooting 10. Explosion at fireworks factory 11. Pastagate 12. Turban in soccer 13. Resignation of Montreal mayor Tremblay 14. Shafia “honour” killing trial 15. Police raid at Montreal city hall [email protected] Twitter: MacphersonGaz © Copyright © The Montreal Gazette