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189 résultats trouvés

  1. jesseps

    Canada - 100 Million Citizens

    For a while now I have been thinking about how Canada would be like, if we actually had a decent size population. I found an article from the Globe and Mail from a few years ago, saying we should really consider increasing the number of immigrants coming to this country. How do we get 1.9 million new people to move to Canada and live here, each and every year? Yes, the current major cities like Toronto and Montreal will continue to grow, but we should find ways to get other cities to grow also. If we did manage to get to 100,000,000 people living in Canada by 2050, we would have a density of 10 people per sq.km. That would be almost similar to present day Russia (excl. the annexation of Crimea). The US has 35 people per sq.km. With that we would see Canada explode to well over 300 million people. Yes it would be a lot of more mouths to feed. Plus we would need a rapid expansion in new urban centers across the provinces and especially the territories. We would also need to develop/revitalize current industries and create new industries. I know the energy (petrol) and mining sectors are in the toilet, but if we managed to increase the population, we would probably bring those industries back to life. We may be able to finally fly Montreal to Vancouver or within this country for cheaper or drive through the Prairies and be bored out of our minds or even driving all the way to Iqaluit and not worry about the gas tank, seeing there may be a station close by and not 1000's of km away. Also we can finally see many of the national parks and provincial/territorial parks, that are inaccessible and costs 10s of thousands of to visit. The reason I bring up the territories, they are grossly under populated. If there are more people there and more towns/cities connecting them to the south, the cost of living there will decrease. Plus by 2050-2100, more people will be moving north because of climate change. I found one agency formulate by 2050, we would see Canada's population grow to well under 50 million, we would be one of the wealthiest per capita, but our GDP would be lower. If we could increase the population to 100 million and also find a way to still have a similar GDP per capita as the one forecast for 2050 with 50 million, we would be the 4th wealthiest instead of the 17th. It is a long shot and I know Canada has a lot to do before that time, but we should really think about the future of this country.
  2. Repairs to Hélène de Champlain building force eatery to shut Restaurant's owner plans to close it down when lease expires at end of 2009 ALAN HUSTAK, The Gazette Published: 8 hours ago The building that houses the Hélène de Champlain restaurant on Île Ste. Hélène needs massive repairs, and the restaurant will close for good in 16 months when its lease expires. Pierre Marcotte, the French- language television personality who has leased the red sandstone building from the city since 1983, says the property needs between $3 million and $5 million in repairs. "We have no choice but to close," he said. "The city has decided not to renew its lease after 2009 in order to undertake the repairs. That could take a year or more to complete. The electrical and heating systems are outdated, and major repairs to the building itself are necessary." Initially meant to be a sports pavilion, the island chalet was built during the Depression as a Quebec government make-work project. It was designed by Émile Daoust to resemble a Norman château, and the grounds were landscaped by Frederick Todd. It was turned over to the city in 1942 and in 1955 became a municipal restaurant, but didn't get a liquor licence until 1960. In 1966, Mayor Jean Drapeau had the building redone as the official residence for Expo 67's Commissioner-General, Pierre Dupuy. It also had a hall of honour next to the main dining room that was used by Drapeau as a reception centre for visiting dignitaries and heads of state. The reception for French President Charles de Gaulle was held in the chalet after he delivered his controversial "Vive le Québec libre" speech. Even though the restaurant proved to be a money-loser, Drapeau kept its five dining rooms open until 1977, when they were closed because of a labour dispute. They reopened in 1981. Marcotte said he does not plan to renew his lease, and no one is certain what will happen to the building once the repair work is done. In the past, there has been talk of converting the site into a hotel for high rollers at the Montreal Casino. ahustak@ thegazette.canwest.com
  3. IluvMTL

    #DontHave1Million

    Don't have a million dollars for a Vancouver home? A new Twitter campaign shows youre not alone The #DontHave1Million hashtag is spreading on Twitter, as people complain about being priced out of the housing market. Photograph by: Screenshot , Twitter Don’t have $1 million for a house in Vancouver? Turns out you’re not alone. A hashtag campaign created by 29-year-old Vancouverite Eveline Xia is encouraging priced-out urbanites to speak up about their home ownership woes by sharing their age and profession on Twitter. The campaign, called #DontHave1Million, is attracting posts from engineers, planners and scientists, as well as real estate agents from other B.C. communities where housing is cheaper. “Will never be able to afford living in the city I grew up in,” tweeted a business graduate. “Every city everywhere in this country needs the people that keep it going,” added an industrial rigger and specialty mover. “If only I could plant a money tree instead of bok choi, kale or mustard,” said another poster. But others countered with posts calling the tweeters entitled. “Don’t be foolish ... rent and invest instead,” said one. “Buy within your means. Move to the burbs. Suck it up, buttercup,” said another. Responding to critics of her campaign in a statement on Twitter, Xia said her generation is “not looking for a handout,” but rather “asking for a fighting chance to stay here in the city we love.” Salaries have not kept pace with housing prices, she noted, and young, talented workers are beginning to leave in favour of communities where they can afford to buy a home for their families. “To have a diverse, interesting and thriving community, Vancouver needs people like us to stay, work and raise our families here,” she said. According to a VanCity report released in March, the average detached Vancouver home could cost $2.1 million by 2030. “Although 75 per cent of Millennials think that home ownership is a primary long-term goal ... many will have to revise their goals to accommodate rising unaffordability in Metro Vancouver,” said the report. Warning that if trends are not reversed, homes in the suburbs will also become increasingly unaffordable for people earning the median income, the report said a reversal would be possible through public policy and changes in financial practices. Those using the #DontHave1Million hashtag expressed hope that the social media campaign would be the start of a “revolt” leading to change. gluymes@theprovince.com sent via Tapatalk
  4. Le poids des ans commence à se faire sentir sur le sympathique stade Uniprix et Tennis Canada projette des rénovations de l'ordre de 11,8 millions qui le rendront conforme aux normes des grands tournois internationaux, a appris Le Journal de Montréal. Cela fait déjà 13 ans (1996) que les installations avaient été complètement remodelées au coût de 25 millions. Depuis ce temps, la popularité de l'événement a connu une croissance phénoménale et en plus, le site sert maintenant de base au Centre national d'entraînement. Sans compter la pratique récréative du sport au stade, qui compte pour 45% des plages horaires sur les courts, dont l'occupation d'octobre à avril est de 100%. Avec tout cet achalandage, les travaux sont rendus nécessaires afin «d'assurer la pérennité et la croissance des Internationaux de tennis du Canada à Montréal, l'un des neuf tournois majeurs des circuits professionnels de l'ATP et la WTA», a souligné Tennis Canada dans un document présenté récemment à la Ville de Montréal. Fonds publics Tennis Canada investira 1,6 million, le reste provenant des trois paliers de gouvernement : 1,6 million de Montréal, et une somme de 8,6 millions divisée à part égale entre Québec (programme d'infrastructures) et Ottawa (Chantiers Canada) à même les enveloppes budgétaires déjà en place. On prévoit l'ajout de quatre nouveaux courts sur terre battue, de nouveaux salons aériens, des vestiaires remodelés, une galerie de presse moderne et une aire d'accueil améliorée au stade secondaire. Le projet a été très bien reçu par la Ville de Montréal, reste à négocier les modalités de financement avec Québec et Ottawa. Dans le meilleur des scénarios, les travaux débuteraient au printemps 2010. # Les Internationaux de tennis du Canada existent depuis 1881; c'est le 3e plus vieux tournoi du monde après Wimbledon et le US Open. # De 2001 à 2007, selon une étude de la firme CFM Stratégies, les retombées économiques du tournoi sont passées de 15 à 28 millions, une augmentation de 9% par année. # Le tournoi fait l'objet de plus de 2000 heures de diffusion dans 150 pays. # Près de 50% des revenus générés par les deux Coupe Rogers sont réinvestis au Québec pour le développement du tennis. source: http://www.canoe.com/sports/nouvelles/archives/2009/05/20090515-062700.html
  5. denpanosekai

    Place Alexis-Nihon (Target, IGA, etc.)

    I figured I would start a thread dedicated to Place Alexis-Nihon, since it's undergoing significant renovations. You may think this is all cosmetic but they will be introducing significant measures to improve accessibility. Target is to open Fall 2013 fall and I was told the 8 million dollars IGA expansion is scheduled for January 2014. The food court will be completely remodeled in Summer 2014.
  6. MONTREAL, July 6, 2016 /CNW Telbec/ - Technoparc Montreal is pleased to present its activity report of 2015 via its annual report. The annual report describes the activities of 2015, a definite year of building! During the year, three major industrial projects (amongst the largest in Greater Montreal) were launched. These projects are the installation of the North American headquarters of Green Cross Biotherapeutics, the installation of ABB's Canadian headquarters and the construction of Vidéotron's 4Degrés data centre. These three major projects can be added to the list of companies that have chosen to locate their activities at the Technoparc. According to an analysis conducted by E&B DATA in 2015, the future construction of the new buildings at the Technoparc will generate $580 million to Quebec's GDP, $109 million to Quebec's public administration revenues and $37 million to federal public administration revenues. According to Carl Baillargeon, Technoparc Montreal's Director – Communications & Marketing "These projects represent the creation of more than 1,000 new jobs at the Technoparc, an investment of $400 million and the addition of 600 000 square feet to the real estate inventory. These are indeed excellent news for the economy of Montreal and the province of Quebec. This also confirms Technoparc's role as an important component of the economical development. In addition, the recent announcement of the proposed Réseau Électrique Métropolitain (electric train) by the CDPQ Infra, in which a station is planned at the Technoparc, reinforces the strategic location of the site and will thereby facilitate the access to the site via transportation means other than the car. " Technoparc Montréal is a non-profit organization that provides high-tech companies and entrepreneurs with environments and real-estate solutions conducive to innovation, cooperation and success. For more information, please see the website at http://www.technoparc.com. The 2015 annual report can be consulted online at: http://www.technoparc.com/static/uploaded/Files/brochures-en/Rapport-2015-EN_WEB.pdf SOURCE Technoparc Montréal
  7. I'm going to enjoy the popcorn and watch the whiners come out "http://business.financialpost.com/news/transportation/air-canada-wants-torontos-pearson-airport-to-be-a-mega-hub-but-high-costs-stand-in-the-way" "Canada has long been an afterthought for the global aviation market, an out-of-the-way destination with taxes and fees so high that some five million Canadians a year trek across the border to fly out of cheaper U.S. airports. But Air Canada and the Greater Toronto Airports Authority (GTAA) are determined to flip that view on its head by turning Toronto’s Pearson International Airport into a mega-hub on the scale of Amsterdam’s Schiphol, Singapore’s Changi or Dubai International Airport. Pearson is already well on its way to meeting that goal since it attracts more international passengers than any other airport in North America except John F. Kennedy International Airport (JFK) in New York City. Toronto’s primary airport is now the fourth-largest entry point by air into the United States, surpassing many large U.S. airports, according to National Bank analyst Cameron Doerksen. But to become a true mega-hub comparable in scope and status to the Dubais of the world, a lot needs to change. Pesky taxes and fees make Pearson “the most expensive airport in the world at which to land a plane,” according to a 2012 Senate report. There’s also the problem of congestion — in the airport, on its runways and on surrounding roadways — that will only get worse unless significant investments are made in infrastructure. If these issues aren’t addressed, Pearson could miss out on an opportunity to become part of the exclusive mega-hub club — there are currently only 11 worldwide — and all the attendant economic benefits, including the creation of more than 200,000 jobs in the area. Jack Boland / Toronto Sun / QMI Agency Jack Boland / Toronto Sun / QMI AgencyToronto's Pearson International Airport is a hub for passengers coming into Canada domestically and internationally. The GTAA, which manages and operates Pearson, defines a mega-hub as an airport that processes 50 million passengers a year, including at least 20 million international passengers, and connects to 80 per cent of the global economy. Pearson is pretty close to those numbers. In 2015, it moved 41 million passengers, including 25 million international travellers, and connected to 67 per cent of the global economy. It was recently ranked 19th in the world for its connectivity — sandwiched between Philadelphia, which is not a mega-hub, and Frankfurt, which is — by air-travel intelligence company OAG. There’s plenty of potential for further growth at Pearson. Howard Eng, GTAA’s chief executive, said the airport has the largest catchment area — defined as the population within a 90-minute flight — of any airport in North America, bigger than even JFK or Los Angeles International Airport (LAX). Pearson also has an enthusiastic partner in Air Canada, which accounts for 57.6 per cent of the airport’s seat capacity, according to the Centre for Aviation, and has been pursuing an aggressive international growth strategy using its new fleet of Boeing 787s. To support Air Canada, the GTAA has agreed to fix the airline’s fees for 10 years in exchange for agreed-upon passenger growth targets, and will offer rebates if it exceeds those targets. “They want to be a mega-carrier and, as a result of that, they need a mega-hub to work out of,” Eng said in an interview. “We’re both aligned on the concept.” One of Air Canada’s main growth pillars is expanding so-called sixth-freedom traffic, or traffic from a second country to a third country via an airline’s home market. In Air Canada’s case, that primarily means Americans travelling from their home cities via Toronto to destinations in Europe or Asia. The airline’s stated goal is to attract a 1.5-per-cent “fair share” of the U.S. sixth-freedom market, which would add $600 to $700 million in incremental revenue, but chief executive Calin Rovinescu said it can probably do “much better than that.” “We’ve been basically increasing our sixth-freedom flying by mid-to high-teen (percentages) in each of the last two years,” Rovinescu said in a recent interview. He hopes to turn Pearson into a “world-class hub” comparable to Amsterdam, Singapore or Dubai. Related How you can nab premium flights without paying through the nose Air Canada ready to compete with new, low-cost airlines, CEO says “Those countries don’t have a large population base, but they have built very powerful hubs,” Rovinescu said. “Toronto is still relatively speaking underserved in terms of the catchment area and the market potential for it.” But in order to become a truly successful mega-hub, Pearson will need to overcome two major limitations. The first is those exceedingly high costs that drive so many Canadians to U.S. border airports — the equivalent of 64 Boeing 737s every day, according to a 2012 report by the Standing Senate Committee on Transport and Communications. The World Economic Forum’s 2015 Travel and Tourism Competitiveness Report ranked Canada 124th out of 141 countries on price competitiveness. This is a function of Canada’s “antiquated” national airport model, according to a recent review of the Canada Transportation Act (CTA) by former federal cabinet minister David Emerson. In 1994, the federal government transferred the management, operation and development of 26 major airports to non-profit airport authorities while retaining ownership of their land and fixed assets and charging them rent. The GTAA pays Ottawa $130 million a year in ground rents for Pearson. Add in government security charges and, in Ontario, a jet-fuel tax that will hit 6.7 cents a litre by April 2017, and the airport is at a real cost disadvantage compared to its competitors. Tyler Anderson/National Post Tyler Anderson/National PostHoward Eng, president and CEO of the Greater Toronto Airports Authority (GTAA) Pearson’s landing charges alone are “twice that at Boston Logan, a third more than at Chicago O’Hare,” said David Bentley, chief airport analyst at the Australia-based Centre for Aviation. “You know why that is? It’s because of the ridiculous rents that they have to pay.” Emerson’s review of the CTA concluded that the solution is to move towards a fully privatized, for-profit structure with equity-based financing from large institutional investors. “Will privatization make a difference to Canada? I think it probably would,” Bentley said. “Toronto would become more efficient in terms of its costs to airlines and, therefore, could compete better with the likes of Chicago and other airports in the region.” Eng at the GTAA will not say whether he’d prefer a share-capital structure to the current non-profit system. But he’s quick to emphasize that Pearson is already run like a private entity, paying down $500 million in debt over the past four years and investing $700 million of capital in airport infrastructure and amenities since 2010. Pearson has also frozen or reduced the airlines’ average aeronautical fees per passenger for eight consecutive years, for a total reduction of 30 per cent since 2007. “We run it like a private corporation,” Eng said. “My focus is on how we can generate the revenue in order to pay down the debt, reinvest in the airport and create the facility that’s needed to process the passengers.” The second limitation at Pearson is congestion. The airport’s passenger traffic has grown so rapidly that the airport’s infrastructure — its security and customs checkpoints, runways, de-icing stations and even the surrounding roads — are having trouble keeping up. “A lot of people say there’s no competition for airports because every city has one large airport,” Eng said. “But once you’re into the global hub status, in Pearson’s case almost 35 to 40 per cent of our traffic is what we call transfer traffic, they have a choice.” Passengers who are connecting to another destination are generally looking for the shortest connection time, he said. To that end, Pearson is working to improve the flow of passengers and luggage by offering things such as self-serve baggage drops, automated border kiosks and automatic luggage transfers for passengers travelling from certain global cities to other Canadian destinations. However, Eng stressed that Pearson also needs the government’s help to speed up security and border processing times, which are notoriously slow. Most passengers at Pearson wait 20 minutes for pre-board screening compared to five minutes for 95 per cent of passengers at London’s Heathrow Airport and Hong Kong International Airport. “We’re not asking for a special favour, (just) that they provide their processes in a manner that is equivalent to what the best airports are doing around the world,” he said. Ernest Doroszuk/Toronto Sun/QMI Agency Ernest Doroszuk/Toronto Sun/QMI AgencyTravellers at Terminal 1 at Toronto Pearson International Airport The GTAA is also working with other airports in southern Ontario, including those in Hamilton, London and Kitchener-Waterloo, to encourage them to take some of the burden off Pearson by providing more short-haul, private-jet, cargo and charter flights. Another key part of Pearson’s mega-hub strategy is to improve the notoriously bad road traffic around the airport region. According to the GTAA, only 10 per cent of Pearson’s passengers arrive on public transit compared to 39 per cent in Amsterdam and 63 per cent in Hong Kong. A recent study by the Neptis Foundation found that there are a million car trips per day in and out of the Pearson region by employees and travellers. The recent launch of the Union Pearson Express rail line to downtown Toronto has helped, but “not enough,” Eng said. “We probably need various domestic lines, special lines, high-speed rail lines,” he said, adding that the GTAA is prepared to help fund the development of a ground-transportation hub at the airport, but it will need government support as well. fp1201_mega_hub_transitIf Pearson isn’t able to lower its costs and improve its infrastructure, it could miss out on a huge potential economic opportunity. According to Frontier Economics, becoming a mega-hub will increase the airport economic zone’s GDP by 75 per cent to $62.1 billion and create more than 200,000 jobs by 2030. “Airports are changing from city airports to airport cities,” said John Kasarda, director of the Center for Air Commerce at the University of North Carolina. Kasarda devised the concept of the “aerotropolis,” a notion that airports are far more than just transportation infrastructure, but rather anchors of regional business development. “The 21st-century airport is quite different than the 20th-century airport,” he said. “They’re multi-modal, multi-functional enterprises that attract a substantial amount of commercial development.” This can create a virtuous circle of expansion, Kasarda added. “Not only does the better airline connectivity, the route structure, serve as this magnet for business, but as business grows it generates greater volumes of passengers and cargo, which supports more airline connectivity,” he said. “It’s mutually reinforcing.” Smoother connections can also help keep airlines’ costs down by generating more non-aeronautical revenue from retail, restaurants and other services. “It’s a necessity, not an option,” Kasarda said.
  8. http://journalmetro.com/local/hochelaga-maisonneuve/actualites/960945/lesplanade-du-parc-olympique-attire-un-million-de-personnes/ 09/05/2016 Mise à jour : 9 mai 2016 | 11:06 L’Esplanade du Parc Olympique attire un million de personnes Par Catherine Paquette TC Media Collaboration spéciale/Jean-Francois Hamelin L'esplanade Financière Sun Life Depuis 2012, le Parc olympique anime et fait vivre l’Esplanade Financière Sun Life avec des festivals, des concerts et des rendez-vous citoyens. En quatre ans, un million de visiteurs ont pris part aux activités offertes à l’ombre du mât du stade. L’esplanade, dont la superficie est de 300 000 pieds carrés, a été au cœur des efforts de relance du Parc olympique. Ce dernier a d’ailleurs souligné la semaine dernière son millionième visiteur sur l’Esplanade Financière Sun Life. «On voulait que les gens renouent avec le Stade olympique, que ça démocratise l’endroit et que ça le décloisonne. Les gens ne se sentaient pas bienvenus donc on a choisi d’y mettre des événements pour qu’on se l’approprie», explique Cédric Essiminy, conseiller en relations publiques pour le Parc Olympique. Depuis, les événements se sont multipliés à l’Esplanade Financière Sun Life, un lieu autrefois presque inutilisé. Les Montréalais ont notamment assisté à des concerts de l’Orchestre Symphonique de Montréal (OSM), pris part au festival de sports d’action Jackalope, suivi des sessions de yoga vêtus de blanc et patiné en famille. «Au début ce qu’on avait c’était seulement les vendredis, c’était tout petit, quelques camions avec des DJs. Puis, les promoteurs se sont ajoutés. Ce qu’on voulait faire c’est tout ce qui ne se faisait pas ailleurs en événementiel à Montréal», ajoute M. Essiminy. Pour la suite des choses, le Parc olympique espère faire de l’endroit un lieu encore plus tourné vers sa clientèle du quartier Hochelaga-Maisonneuve. Des designers et urbanistes travaillent actuellement à bonifier le lieu pour le rendre «plus accueillant et plus vivant». De nouvelles animations et des ateliers sur l’écologie et l’agriculture pourraient s’y dérouler dès l’été.
  9. Westmount needs you! With this mailing, we are appealing to your civic duty. We need your input on the most important project the City of Westmount has put forward in its long history: the rebuilding of the Westmount arena and pool. Council would like to proceed with this project, but only if a majority of taxpayers is behind it. It is your money, after all, that will help pay for it. I shall not pretend that the history of this rebuilding project so far has been a smooth one. Mind you, nor was the struggle to restore and expand the Westmount Library in the 1990s, but it was a project most citizens became very proud of. Your Council feels this same success can be repeated with the arena/pool project. But only if it is a rallying point and not a focus of division and rancour. There were two separate designs suggested for the arena/pool project by the previous Council during 2009. A great deal of work went into these proposals, but they received mixed reviews in a series of public meetings. The whole of Westmount, however, was never canvassed. The new Council, since its election in November 2009, has been working on ways to address the objections raised by citizens to the prior proposals. Objectors fell into two broad camps: people in the neighbourhood saw the new arena as a massive intrusion, a wall 30 feet high by 500 feet long from St Catherine Street to de Maisonneuve, jutting into Westmount Park; meanwhile, the pool itself ate up precious green space. For the rest of Westmount, concerns had more to do with the cost: do we really need to go from one-and-one-half to two rinks? Why can’t we just fix up the existing arena? Others felt we needed an indoor pool more than a replication of our current sports mix. The cost concerns were substantially mitigated by the crowning achievement of my predecessor Mayor Karin Marks: she managed, by dint of incredible perseverance - and the help of Jacques Chagnon, our local MNA - to get $20 million of infrastructure grants for the project. It is Canada’s and Quebec’s contribution that allows us to build a $37 million arena/pool complex that will cost Westmounters $17 million. In fact, the cost to taxpayers will probably be closer to $12 million, thanks to contributions from Westmount schools, foundations, and private donors. This cost translates into an additional $200 a year in taxes for the average single-family dwelling. What about the neighbours and the sheer bulk of the arena? Well, if we had to describe the essence of our city, we would surely be torn between invoking Westmount’s unique architectural heritage and Westmount’s prized greenspace. This Council wants a project that respects both. We want the park to win the battle between it and the arena. We do not wish to plunk a massive piece of architecture down in an established greenspace. So we have gone underground. Council’s plan is to bury the ice rinks, putting tennis courts and grass on top of them - creating the ultimate green roof. Skylights will bring in natural light. Only the entrance pavilion and Teen Centre will be above-ground. more pics and full desc. http://www.westmount.org/pdf_files/ArenaPool_Proposal.pdf
  10. With a goal to make John Abbott College a leader in health-related fields, a symbolic groundbreaking ceremony took place Tuesday for the CEGEP's new science and technology building. The new five-storey, $30-million project will house facilities to train nurses, ambulance technicians and pharmaceutical technicians. "This will train students in English in areas where we have a shortage of qualified workers," said Education Minister Line Beauchamps. To be completed in 2012, the building, equipped with geothermic heating, will benefit from $8 million in financing from federal and provincial governments. http://montreal.ctv.ca/servlet/an/local/CTVNews/20100831/mtl_JAC_100831/20100831?hub=Montreal
  11. Super de belle entrevue ici (Ça confirme plusieurs de nos discussions) As city goes, so do airports (2016-02-13 page B1) As chief executive of the non-profit authority Aéroports de Montréal, James Cherry has invested close to $2 billion in improvements to Pierre Elliott Trudeau Airport over the last decade. He sat down recently with Montreal Gazette contributor Peter Hadekel. Q What economic impact does an airport have on a city? A You may have the best airport in the world but if there isn't an economically vibrant city behind it to drive that traffic, then airlines aren't interested. We are more profitable and have better growth than most of the other airports, but our bond rating isn't as good. The reason is that more than 50 per cent of the rating of an airport is the economic activity in the city around it. Our ability to offer air service is far more affected by the economic vitality of the city. (I know Mark, you told us many times) Q Why did it take so long to convince Chinese airlines to come here? A They weren't necessarily convinced that this was a viable market. It took us years to convince them. Now we have Air China flying three times a week to Beijing and they are enchanted with the results (GREAT). The next logical thing would be for Air China to offer more than three times a week or ultimately, within a few years, go daily. Q So what's the key to getting more destinations? A The city has to be realistic. I get people telling me all the time: 'Why don't you have a daily flight to Helsinki? It's an emerging city.' Well, take a look at the numbers: 10 people a day go from Montreal to Helsinki. I'm sorry, you're not going to get a flight there. In order to get a direct flight at least three times a week, depending on the type of aircraft, you typically need between 30,000 and 40,000 passengers a year. Q What destinations are you adding in 2016? A Reykjavik and Lyon are starting in May. Air Canada to Casablanca is starting next summer, as well. Philadelphia, Denver and Houston are also starting this year. Remember, it's very tough for an airline to make money just on tourist business. They need that business traffic, that's what pays the overhead. Q What about the market for connecting passengers going through Montreal? A It's 18 per cent and growing, but that's not considered high. Toronto and Vancouver would be about 30 per cent. We've been targeting something like 25 per cent. Virtually all that connecting traffic is on Air Canada. We have more destinations for people to connect to today. There are 140 destinations served directly by this airport with more than 30 airlines. Transit passengers are very important because there's revenue to be gained from having them go through your airport. They are also important to justify a flight. There are two or three European destinations to which we would not have flights, were it not for connecting passengers. Zurich, Brussels and Geneva are good examples. Q The domestic traffic in Toronto is three times what it is here and in Vancouver and Calgary it's close to two times. How do you explain that? Calgary it's close to two times. How do you explain that? A Quebecers don't fly domestically. They don't vacation in Alberta, B.C. or Ontario and the business traffic here is as much north-south as east-west. Q You offer financial incentives to attract airlines to serve Montreal. Is that getting more expensive? A Yes it is. Airlines know that everybody wants them. They will not establish a new route unless they are getting some sort of incentive. The logic of it is that the upfront cost tends to be expensive because of promotions and everything else. And there's a period where they tend to lose money so we offer them some support, usually in the form of lower landing fees or a budget to help them promote the flight. Q Is the cross-border competition significant from airports like Plattsburgh and Burlington? Do you feel it? A No, and it's going down this year because of the dollar. It's way down. Q You have complained in the past about the rent that Aéroports de Montréal is charged by the federal government and the property tax due to the city of Montreal. Is that still an issue for you? A Yes, I take every opportunity to talk about it but I know it falls on deaf ears. So far, the federal government has shown absolutely no interest in solving the problem. The city of Montreal is even worse. They just close their ears. Between the two of them, we will pay close to $100 million this year. Property taxes and rent take 20 per cent offthe top just to provide a public service. This is happening across the country. More than $300 million a year goes to the government of Canada from the airports. Q In the surveys that you do, what is the biggest concern for passengers using the airport? A Access to the site is the No. 1 complaint: getting in and out, traffic, the Dorval Circle. I'm still looking at the bridge to nowhere (part of the new Dorval interchange under construction). It's been a bridge to nowhere for five or six years. We rebuilt all the roads on this property to match with it. This was all supposed to be ready in 2011. We spent $100 million of our money making that happen and it was done on time. And we're still waiting for the project to be completed. Q What's going on with Mirabel following the decision to demolish the passenger terminal? A Mirabel is still operating for freight. There are between 15,000 and 20,000 aircraft movements there. Business aircraft use it, too. Bombardier is up there with Pratt Whitney. We characterize it as a business, industrial and freight airport. We're going to put between $50 million and $60 million up there in the next year to redo the principal runway. We're not abandoning Mirabel; the vocation is solid. The decision wasn't made in a vacuum. We consulted with the city of Montreal, the Quebec government and Transport Canada. There was nothing wrong with the process. We were very highly accountable. Q Part of the debate about keeping Mirabel as a passenger airport was the noise and congestion issue at Dorval. Do you think you've managed that issue adequately? A Essentially, over the last 14 years we've doubled the passengers at this airport with the same number of aircraft movements. (interesting) The airlines have gotten very good at this. They don't fly half-empty planes. Is it perfect? No - there will always be people who are not going to be happy with noise. (Also, YUL dates back to 1941; nobody was around then...Overall noise also went down since Q What's the case for public transit to the airport? A We have over 11,000 parking spaces here and for three months of the year, there's no room. I don't want to build more parking spaces because I think it's a dumb thing to do and will encourage more people to bring cars here. We need two things: a Dorval Circle that works and a train that connects to downtown. Q The Caisse de dépot et placement is looking at funding the rail project. Do you think this is providing some new momentum? A It's interesting. They haven't progressed far. But from our perspective there should be better transit to the West Island that incorporates the airport. If the Caisse makes this happen, we're ready. We've done all sorts of ridership studies and feasibility studies, and we've given them all of it. Q You have a train station location that's ready in the centre of the airport? A Yes. In 2006, when we started the project to build out the U.S. jetty and a new hotel, we had a choice to make. We said: 'If we don't do this now, we're going to shut off any possibility of having a train station.' So the shell is there. We're parking cars in it now but it could be fitted out within a year and ready to roll.
  12. Ce projet va renaitre de ses cendres (en partie), via un autre promoteur Simon Property Group, Calloway REIT, and SmartCentres Announce Second Premium Outlet Center® in Canada to Serve Montreal Area INDIANAPOLIS, May 21, 2012 /PRNewswire/ -- Simon Property Group, Inc. (NYSE: SPG), the world's leading retail real estate company, Calloway Real Estate Investment Trust ("Calloway") (TSX: CWT-UN) and SmartCentres announced plans to develop their second Premium Outlet Center® in Canada. The center will be located in the Town of Mirabel, Quebec, approximately 20 miles north of Montreal. The project, called Montreal Premium Outlets®, is a joint venture between Simon, Calloway and SmartCentres. Simon will own 50% of the project. The Mirabel site is located on Highway 15 at Notre Dame Street. Phase 1 will be comprised of 350,000 square feet of gross leasable area and 80 stores. Construction is expected to begin in 2013. The first Simon and Calloway project, Toronto Premium Outlets, located in the Town of Halton Hills, is currently under construction and on schedule for a summer 2013 opening. "Due to the strong response to our first announced project in the Toronto area, we are excited to now bring the Premium Outlets branded concept of upscale outlet shopping to the Montreal area," remarked John R. Klein, President of Simon's Premium Outlets platform. "We are pleased to quickly expand our presence in Canada and our partnership with Calloway and SmartCentres to develop another first-class project." "Opening a new Premium Outlet Center in the Montreal area will help fulfill the merchant demand for growth in Canada while providing economic benefits in and around Mirabel," said Al Mawani, CEO of Calloway. "With more than four million residents in the area, we look forward to bringing a high-quality outlet shopping experience to the region." "We're pleased to be partnering with Simon Property Group, the world leader in the shopping and outlet center business. We are excited about bringing many new international designer brands to the Canadian consumer at affordable prices," said Mitchell Goldhar, CEO of SmartCentres. "I am delighted with this decision to develop a portion of the Lac Mirabel lands and welcome Premium Outlets to our city," said Hubert Meilleur, Mayor of the City of Mirabel. "They can count on the City's full cooperation in seeing this new project through to its successful completion. Being the first in Quebec to have a Premium Outlets concept is something for us to be very proud of." Simon Property Group's outlet portfolio comprises 70 Premium Outlet Centers® including 57 in the United States, one in Puerto Rico, eight in Japan, two in Korea and one in Malaysia and Mexico. Premium Outlet Centers in the United States are located primarily in or near major metropolitan markets such as New York, Los Angeles, Boston and Chicago and visitor markets such as Orlando, Las Vegas and Palm Springs. Premium Outlets properties are distinguished by their unparalleled mix of leading designers and name brands selling direct to consumers at significant savings with each being an architecturally distinct village setting with charm and ambiance. About Simon Property Group Simon Property Group, Inc. (NYSE: SPG) is an S&P 100 company and the largest real estate company in the world. The Company currently owns or has an interest in 337 retail real estate properties in North America and Asia comprising 244 million square feet. We are headquartered in Indianapolis, Indiana and employ approximately 5,500 people in the U.S. For more information, visit the Simon Property Group website at http://www.simon.com. About Calloway Calloway is one of Canada's largest real estate investment trusts with an enterprise value of approximately $6 billion. It owns and manages approximately 26 million square feet in 118 value-oriented retail centres having the strongest national and regional retailers, as well as strong neighbourhood merchants. Calloway's vision is to provide a value-oriented shopping experience to Canadian consumers. For more information on Calloway, visit http://www.callowayreit.com. About SmartCentres A privately held Canadian company, SmartCentres has developed more than 200 shopping centres in communities big and small, and operates in every province. SmartCentres is committed to bringing value to Canadian communities through the efficiencies of unenclosed shopping centre formats each adapted to the market in which it is located. For more information on SmartCentres, visit http://www.smartcentres.com. http://phx.corporate-ir.net/phoenix.zhtml?c=113968&p=irol-newsArticle&ID=1698130&highlight= SOURCE Simon Property Group, Inc.
  13. http://montrealgazette.com/business/local-business/real-estate/former-pm-brian-mulroneys-westmount-home-finally-sold?__lsa=4c7f-627d Former PM Brian Mulroney's Westmount home sells for $6 million 1021 photo reimagined MONTREAL GAZETTE More from Montreal Gazette Published on: May 22, 2015 Last Updated: May 22, 2015 11:40 AM EDT Brian Mulroney's home in Westmount sold for about $6 million. Former prime minister Brian Mulroney’s Westmount mansion — which went on the market in 2013 — has at last been sold. The five-bedroom, five-bathroom home on Forden Cres. sold for nearly $6 million, below the original price tag of $7.9 million. On Friday, the real-estate website on which is appeared had marked the home as sold, for $5,799,999. The property includes an outdoor pool, library and fenced-in yard. “This home is for a buyer who seeks an elegant home and privacy,” read the listing by Montreal power broker Marie-Yvonne Paint. “An elegant layout and spacious rooms sets it in a class of its own.” The home, registered in the name of Mulroney’s wife, was purchased in 1993 under her maiden name Mila Pivnicki. The deed of sale lists a purchase price of $1 – buyers could keep those details confidential back in the day – but multiple media outlets pegged the real cost of the home at $1,675,000. Apparently the couple spent another $700,000 on renovations sent via Tapatalk
  14. New technology that can detect when graffiti vandals are tagging train cars is being heralded in Australia as a major breakthrough in crime prevention. The electronic sensor, called a "mousetrap," has been tested across the network and has so far led to the arrest of 30 people. It works by detecting the vapours of spray cans and markers while they are in use and alerting transport authorities and police. Australian Transport Minister Andrew Constance said it was a useful tool. "What this means is that those who commit graffiti can now be caught immediately, with can in hand, marker in hand, doing the damage," he said. "[Mousetrap] provides real-time information, triggering closed-circuit TV back to Sydney Trains staff and also real-time information provided directly to the Police Transport command." Sydney Trains declined to say how many of the devices would be rolled out across the network but indicated they would be randomly moved from different train lines. Removing graffiti cost taxpayers $34 million last financial year, up from $30 million the year before. Sydney Trains chief executive Howard Collins said it was a big problem. "Our customers hate it – it's one of the top customer complaints and cleaners work hard to remove about 11,000 tags from trains each month," he said. "We know customers feel unsafe when they are using a train which is covered in graffiti and offenders often place themselves and others in danger by trespassing on the railway or being somewhere they shouldn't. "When I came to Sydney 10 years ago most of the trains had graffiti inside and out. We now work on keeping our trains clean." http://www.cbc.ca/news/technology/mousetrap-can-detect-when-graffiti-vandals-are-tagging-trains-1.3066838?cmp=rss
  15. Moins d’un million de dollars par mine par Michel Pepin publié le 1 mai 2015 à 17 h 24 Il y a parfois des chiffres qui parlent plus que les mots et plus que toutes les promesses. Par exemple, il y a CE chiffre, 23 650 000, qui en dit plus long que tous les Plan Nord de ce monde. Ce chiffre représente le nombre de dollars que les propriétaires des 24 mines en exploitation au Québec ont versés en redevances en 2013-2014 selon les comptes publics du Québec. C’est moins d’un million de dollars par mine, en moyenne. Oui, c’était une mauvaise année, les prix des minerais étaient bas et les minières ont donc réalisé très peu de profits. Néanmoins, cela n’a pas empêché ces entreprises de retirer pour au moins 7 milliards de dollars en minerais du sous-sol québécois. De ces 23 millions de dollars, il pourrait être déduit les coûts d’administration au ministère pour le secteur des mines (plus de 15 millions de dollars). Il pourrait être aussi pris en compte le coût des 723 sites miniers abandonnés qui devront être réhabilités par l’État. Une facture de 800 millions de dollars est évoquée sur le site du ministère. Les crédits d’impôt relatifs aux ressources et les avantages fiscaux reliés aux actions accréditives ne sont pas pris en compte dans ce calcul. Dans son rapport de 2009, le vérificateur général révélait que ces dépenses fiscales représentaient une somme plus importante que l’ensemble des redevances minières. Rien n’indique, au contraire, que la situation était différente en 2013-2014. En revanche, il est vrai qu’il y a eu une année (2011) où 300 millions de dollars ont été recueillis en redevances minières, alors que la pelletée de minerai de fer valait trois fois celle d’aujourd’hui. Toutes ces données n’ont pas refroidi l’enthousiasme du premier ministre Couillard qui a évoqué, sans la moindre gêne, la priorité que représente le développement durable dans le cadre du dévoilement de sa version du Plan Nord. Il n’est pas facile d’imaginer le caractère durable du développement minier, une activité qui consiste à extraire une ressource qui ne peut se renouveler. Tout cela confirme que la vision de Québec pour le développement des ressources minières repose surtout sur la création d’emplois et l’activité économique que cela peut générer en région. Toutefois, la Caisse de dépôt et placement et Investissement Québec possèdent des participations dans certains projets (la mine d’or Osisko à Malartic et le projet de mine de diamants Renard de Stornoway) qui pourraient se révéler profitables. Car, si en apparence, Québec a reçu moins d’un million de dollars par mine, en réalité, il n’a même pas reçu « une cenne la tonne », comme on disait du temps de Duplessis. En fait, en 2013-2014, le gouvernement du Québec a payé les compagnies minières pour exploiter son sous-sol, qui elles, malgré la baisse des prix par rapport à 2011, ont accéléré la cadence de production et ont extrait davantage de fer, de nickel, de cuivre et d’or en 2013-2014. Si tout va bien, ce sont 65 millions de dollars que les Québécois recevront en 2014-2015 en redevances minières. En échange de 7 milliards de dollars de ressources. Si tout va bien. http://blogues.radio-canada.ca/politique/2015/05/01/moins-dun-million-de-dollars-par-mine/
  16. Bravo!! http://plus.lapresse.ca/screens/97874aa2-5b16-4f79-80da-073e7f3a2f05%7C_0.html L’élection d’un gouvernement libéral majoritaire a entraîné une hausse « presque immédiate » des ventes de résidences de luxe à Montréal en 2014, affirme Sotheby’s dans une étude qui sera publiée ce matin. Un effet véritable ? Tour d’horizon du marché haut de gamme montréalais. + 21 % Au total, 434 propriétés se sont vendues plus de 1 million de dollars l’an dernier dans le Grand Montréal, contre 359 l’année précédente. Il s’agit d’une hausse de 21 %. Même si le gros des ventes se situe dans la fourchette de prix de 1 à 2 millions, le segment le plus cher a lui aussi connu un rebond marqué, avec sept transactions au-dessus de la barre des 4 millions. « C’est une augmentation de 600 % comparativement à l’unique propriété vendue pendant toute l’année 2013 », souligne Sotheby’s dans son rapport. OUI, MAIS… Le marché haut de gamme a peut-être repris de la vigueur à Montréal, mais il demeure loin derrière celui des trois autres grandes villes canadiennes : Toronto, Vancouver et Calgary. L’EFFET PLQ ? Dans son rapport, Sotheby’s cite clairement l’élection du Parti libéral comme facteur déterminant dans la remontée du marché du luxe montréalais. L’arrivée au pouvoir d’un gouvernement majoritaire – et fédéraliste – en avril aurait ravivé la « confiance » des acheteurs, avance l’agence immobilière, causant un regain « presque immédiat » des ventes. Andy Dodge, président de la firme d’évaluation immobilière Andy Dodge & Associates de Westmount, émet des réserves. « Je croyais aussi que ça allait grimper après le scrutin, a-t-il dit à La Presse Affaires. Ça a bougé pendant trois semaines, puis le feu s’est éteint. » Selon M. Dodge, l’absence de vision claire du gouvernement libéral et le peu d’investisseurs étrangers expliquent cette relative tranquillité du marché de Westmount, le plus luxueux de la région montréalaise. Les prix ont peu bougé depuis l’été 2012, note-t-il. 1,1 MILLION Comment définit-on une résidence de luxe à Montréal ? Selon Sotheby’s, les appartements en copropriété entrent dans cette catégorie à partir de 1,1 million de dollars, les maisons jumelées, à partir de 1,5 million et les maisons individuelles, au-delà de 1,8 million. Ces barèmes ne devraient pas trop bouger en 2015, prévoit la firme. TRANSACTIONS RÉCENTES 11,4 MILLIONS À SENNEVILLE Cette maison de l’Ouest-de-l’Île a été la plus chère vendue l’an dernier dans la région métropolitaine. La résidence de 20 000 pieds carrés compte 10 chambres à coucher, 11 salles de bains et un terrain de basketball intérieur. 6,5 MILLIONS (TAXES NON COMPRISES) À WESTMOUNT Ce luxueux condo neuf se trouve dans le projet M sur la Montagne, situé sur un flanc du mont Royal. Pour attirer les acheteurs fortunés, ce projet de communauté fermée (gated community) mise gros sur son « parc privé » de 700 000 pieds carrés.
  17. qwerty

    Nouveau fonds consacré aux technos

    C'est très intéressant de voir ce nouveau fonds et ca démontre bien la transformation progressive de l'économie de Montréal ainsi que la position de Montréal sur l'échiquier des technos. Publié le 16 décembre 2014 à 06h48 | Mis à jour à 06h48 L'écosystème montréalais des jeunes entreprises en technologie continue de s'étoffer avec la création, qui doit être officiellement annoncée ce matin, d'un nouveau fonds de capital de risque mis sur pied par cinq jeunes entrepreneurs. Ce nouveau fonds, Interaction Ventures, sera doté au départ d'une cagnotte de 1 million de dollars. Ses partenaires fondateurs sont cinq jeunes entrepreneurs déjà actifs dans l'écosystème. Il s'agit de LP Maurice et Frédéric Thouin, cofondateurs de Busbud, Bruno Morency, fondateur de Context.io, Raff Paquin, cofondateur de Frank&Oak, et Guillaume Racine, gestionnaire senior chez Amazon, basé à Londres. Le trésor de guerre d'Interaction Ventures n'est pas des plus imposants, mais les partenaires fondateurs souhaitent occuper un créneau où l'on ne se précipite pas, très tôt dans l'existence d'une entreprise. «Des gens comme Real Ventures, la Banque de développement du Canada (BDC) ou iNovia interviennent généralement plus tard, fait valoir M. Maurice. Il y a un espace qui se créait à l'étape des "anges".» «Real Ventures a commencé un peu comme ça, ajoute M. Morency, mais leur fonds est maintenant rendu à plusieurs millions, et ce n'est plus la même réalité.» Interaction Ventures prévoit des investissements «normalisés» de 50 000$, qu'elle souhaite combiner à ceux de partenaires dans des rondes totalisant jusqu'à 1 million de dollars. Les jeunes entreprises sélectionnées pourront aussi bénéficier de l'expertise des cinq cofondateurs, jugés «complémentaires» par M. Maurice. «Donner des conseils, c'est quelque chose que nous faisons tous déjà. Là, avec notre fonds, c'est un autre niveau.» Ils n'entendent toutefois pas s'imposer. «Le but n'est pas de devenir cofondateurs», rappelle M. Morency. Grâce à une entente avec le fonds iNovia, les entrepreneurs de l'écurie d'Interaction Ventures auront accès à des ressources additionnelles, notamment des événements de maillage. L'un des gestionnaires d'iNovia, Chris Arsenault, servira d'ailleurs de conseiller du nouveau fonds, tout comme Dax Dasilva, fondateur de Lightspeed. La création d'un tel fonds est un gage de maturité de la scène montréalaise, estime M. Maurice. «Tranquillement, il va y en voir de plus en plus, des gens qui vont être dans cette position de pouvoir faire de petits chèques à de jeunes entrepreneurs.»
  18. peekay

    Costly city projects

    Montréal doesn't seem so bad when you compare to the project management of the NYC Port Authority..WOW http://www.nytimes.com/2014/12/03/nyregion/the-4-billion-train-station-at-the-world-trade-center.html?ref=nyregion&_r=2 How Cost of Train Station at World Trade Center Swelled to $4 Billion With its long steel wings poised sinuously above the National September 11 Memorial in Lower Manhattan, the World Trade Center Transportation Hub has finally assumed its full astonishing form, more than a decade after it was conceived. Its colossal avian presence may yet guarantee the hub a place in the pantheon of civic design in New York. But it cannot escape another, more ignominious distinction as one of the most expensive and most delayed train stations ever built. The price tag is approaching $4 billion, almost twice the estimate when plans were unveiled in 2004. Administrative costs alone — construction management, supervision, inspection, monitoring and documentation, among other items — exceed $655 million. Even the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, which is developing and building the hub, conceded that it would have made other choices had it known 10 years ago what it knows now. “It looks like a bird carcass picked clean. Not the intended symbolism, I'm sure.” “We would not today prioritize spending $3.7 billion on the transit hub over other significant infrastructure needs,” Patrick J. Foye, the authority’s executive director, said in October. The current, temporary trade center station serves an average of 46,000 commuters riding PATH trains to and from New Jersey every weekday, only 10,000 more than use the unassuming 33rd Street PATH terminal in Midtown Manhattan. By contrast, 208,000 Metro-North Railroad commuters stream through Grand Central Terminal daily. In fact, the hub, or at least its winged “Oculus” pavilion, could turn out to be more of a high-priced mall than a transportation nexus, attracting more shoppers than commuters. The company operating the mall, Westfield Corporation, promises in a promotional video that it will be “the most alluring retail landmark in the world.” But whatever its ultimate renown, the hub has been a money-chewing project plagued by problems far beyond an exotic and expensive design by its exacting architect, Santiago Calatrava, according to an examination based on two dozen interviews and a review of hundreds of pages of documents. The soaring price tag has also been fueled by the demands of powerful politicians whose priorities outweighed worries about the bottom line, as well as the Port Authority’s questionable management and oversight of private contractors. George E. Pataki, a Republican who was then the governor of New York, was considering a run for president and knew his reputation would be burnished by a train terminal he said would claim a “rightful place among New York City’s most inspiring architectural icons.” He likened the transportation hub to Grand Central and promised — unrealistically — that it would be operating in 2009. But the governor fully supported the Metropolitan Transportation Authority’s desire to keep the newly rebuilt No. 1 subway line running through the trade center site, instead of allowing the Port Authority to temporarily close part of the line and shave months and hundreds of millions of dollars off the hub’s construction. That, however, would have cut an important transit link and angered commuters from Staten Island, a Republican stronghold, who use the No. 1 line after getting off the ferry. The authority was forced to build under, around and over the subway line, at a cost of at least $355 million.
  19. Square Dealing: Changes could be afoot at the iconic Westmount Square BY EVA FRIEDE, MONTREAL GAZETTE OCTOBER 10, 2014 2:16 PM Investor Olivier Leclerc outside Westmount Square, who has purchased 84 units in the complex for $70 million. Photograph by: John Mahoney , Montreal Gazette An investor has bought 84 rental units at Westmount Square for $70 million, and says that less than two months after the sale, he has already resold at least 48 of the apartments. Olivier Leclerc, 26, acting with real estate broker and adviser Albert Sayegh, bought the units at the iconic Mies van der Rohe buildings in August from Elad Canada, a division of the Israeli real estate multinational Tshuva Group. The deal means that Elad has sold all of the approximately 220 units in the two residential towers of Westmount Square. Now it is proposing to convert Tower 1, with 200,000 square feet of office space, to condos. But Westmount has slapped a freeze on all conversions from commercial or institutional buildings to residential use and is studying all development in its southeast commercial sector, from Atwater to Greene Avenues. The freeze is in effect until an interim bylaw is adopted and an update on the study is expected in November, said Westmount councillor Theodora Samiotis. Samiotis, who is the commissioner of urban planning for Westmount, said there are two concerns about such a conversion. First is Westmount Square’s heritage value as a Mies van der Rohe mixed commercial-residential project, completed in 1967. “On a heritage value, obviously we would want to make sure that any architectural aspect of the design would respect that,” she said. And there are those who would argue that changing the usage combination would change the architect’s vision, she said. The complex was conceived with three towers — two residential and one office — and an 86,000-square-foot shopping concourse. Equally important to Samiotis is the commercial vibrancy of the area. “So when you tell me you are changing a commercial tower to a residential tower, I am concerned about the impact this is going to have on my commercial district,” she said. Residential tax rates are lower than commercial rates, so the city also could lose revenue. “It’s not just the conversion of any building. It’s a landmark,” she said. They are very much aware of the proposal to convert the office tower, Sayegh said, but the file is currently closed. “If Tower 1 does occur, we will look at it,” he said. Elad Canada owns, operates or is developing such properties as New York’s Plaza Hotel, Emerald City in Toronto and in Montreal, the Cité Nature development near the Olympic Village and Le Nordelac in Point St-Charles. The 84 Westmount Square units were the remaining rental units in two of the towers. In a meeting at Sayegh’s real estate office — he is president of the commercial division of RE/MAX Du Cartier on Bernard St. W. — Leclerc said he bought the apartments in August as an investment, and resold them to various groups of investors, two of which bought about 12 apartments each. Leclerc would not specify how many of the apartments he intends to keep. It is a significant sale, probably the biggest of the year, said Patrice Ménard of Patrice Ménard Multi-Logement, which specializes in sales of multi-unit residential buildings. But it is not a record. By comparison, the La Cité complex of three buildings with more than 1,300 units sold for $172 million two years ago. Also in 2012, Elad sold the Olympic Village to Capreit Real Estate Investment Trust for about $176 million, Ménard said. Both La Cité and the Olympic Village remain rental properties, however. Both Sayegh and Leclerc emphasized that confidence in the economy was a basis for the Westmount Square purchase. The reselling was not a flip, but a long-term strategy, Sayegh said. “He has his own chess game,” Sayegh said. “The context was favourable to take hold of such a prestigious building — the political context,” Leclerc said. “The socio-economic climate in Quebec has never been as conducive to investments as it is today,” Sayegh added. Leclerc would not say what profit he has taken so far, nor what return he is expecting. “It’s a nice acquisition to my portfolio,” Leclerc said. He also owns or has converted buildings in Mont St-Hilaire and Brossard as well as Hampstead Court on Queen Mary, bought in 2011 and now all sold. Four years ago, Leclerc joined his father, Ghislain, in the business of converting rental buildings to co-operatives. Over 25 years, he and his father have converted more than 2,500 apartments, he said. His father is now semi-retired. With his father, he also worked on the conversion of the Gleneagles apartments on Côte des Neiges Rd., bought in 2010 and sold by 2013. “We do major work. We put the building in top shape,” Leclerc said. “Then we make esthetic improvements. After that, we sell the apartments. “We never throw out the tenants. We profit from the fact that the tenants are in place, who pay rent ‘x’ for an apartment in the state it is in. “We respect the rental laws.” Leclerc said he buys only good buildings in good locations. “The area reflects the tenants. Location, location, location.” At Westmount Square, the tenants are not affected, Leclerc said, as the same company, Cogir, manages the building. The range of price for the 84 apartments was $400,000 to $2 million. efriede@montrealgazette.com Twitter: @evitastyle
  20. http://www.montrealgazette.com/business/Saputo+cent+stake+Life+building+reports/10195809/story.html Ivanhoe Cambridge, the real-estate arm of the Caisse de dépôt et placement du Québec, apparently has found a buyer for the 50 per cent stake in the Sun Life building that it put on the market earlier this year. Published reports Thursday identified the buyers as Montreal’s Saputo family and partners, and the transaction price at $140 million. The Caisse’s real-estate division reportedly acquired its stake for $64 million. Ivanhoe Cambridge has shared ownership of the Metcalfe St. building with insurer Sun Life since 2000. © Copyright © The Montreal Gazette
  21. Huge news! Days of Future Past that was shot here in 2013 grossed $745 million worldwide and cost over $200 million to shoot. The new film's budget could be $250 million + Starring Jennifer Lawrence, Hugh Jackman, Michael Fassbender, James McAvoy, Nicholas Hoult, Channing Tatum. Rumours of the original cast of Ian McKellen, Anna Paquin, Patrick Stewart, Halle Berry returning are also in the air. http://www.cjad.com/cjad-news/2014/09/04/x-men-returning-to-montreal
  22. Valeur des permis de construction pour juin 2014 (en million $) Montreal 1432 Toronto 1277 Calgary 811 Edmonton 542 Vancouver 489 Otta/Gat. 244 K.C.W. 126 Quebec 124 Winnipeg 121 Hamilton 100
  23. ErickMontreal

    Chicago : Trump Files Suit Against Lenders

    Trump Files Suit Against Lenders Developer Seeks to Extend $640 Million Loan on a Chicago Skyscraper Wsj.com By ALEX FRANGOS Tall Trouble: Donald Trump's Chicago skyscraper project, the Trump International Hotel & Tower, during construction in July. Mr. Trump is suing to extend a $640 million senior construction loan on the 92-story Trump International Hotel & Tower from a group of lenders led by Deutsche Bank AG and including a unit of Merrill Lynch & Co., Union Labor Life Insurance Co., iStar Financial Inc., a publicly traded real-estate investment trust, and Highland Funds, a unit of Highland Capital Management LP. The tower, which contains 339 hotel rooms and 486 condominiums, will be the second-tallest building in the U.S. behind Chicago's Sears Tower and is expected to be completed in mid-2009. The hotel, on the lower floors, opened earlier this year. But sales of both the hotel rooms and the condominiums have come in below original estimates and the project's current projected revenue remains short by nearly $100 million needed to pay off the senior lenders. The lawsuit, filed in New York State supreme court in Queens, is a further indication of the dysfunction in the real-estate lending markets as borrowers and lenders struggle to resolve troubled projects. People familiar with the matter say the lender group, which is made up of more than a dozen institutions, was unable to agree on the extension. The suit demands -- among other things -- that an extension provision in the original loan agreement be triggered because of the "unprecedented financial crisis in the credit markets now prevailing, in part due to acts Deutsche Bank itself participated in." This so-called force majeure provision is common in contracts and can be applied to acts of war and natural disasters. Mr. Trump already extended the loan once in May. From the Archives Mr. Trump asked for $3 billion in damages. The suit won't affect construction of the project, according to people familiar who say there is enough money to complete the $90 million work that is left. The suit says Mr. Trump attempted to resolve the impasse by offering to buy the project's unsold hotel units for $97 million. That money would be used to pay down the construction loan, along with the $204 million in proceeds from closed units and the $353 million that is expected from units that close in the next six months. A Deutsche Bank spokesman declined to comment. Mr. Trump has put $77 million of his own equity into the tower, which he would stand to lose in a potential foreclosure. Other than a $40 million guarantee to complete the project, Mr. Trump has no recourse obligations to the project. A Trump spokesman declined to comment. [Trump, Donald] Deutsche Bank originated the construction loan in 2005 and sold off most of it to others, retaining less than $10 million of exposure on that loan. The suit alleges that Deutsche Bank compromised the senior construction loan by selling pieces off to "so many institutions, banks, junk bond firms, and virtually anybody that seemed to come along," that the lending group is unable to come to a consensus on how to deal with the matter. It also alleges Deutsche Bank created a "serious conflict of interest" by taking a separate stake in the project's so-called mezzanine loan that was originated by private-equity firm Fortress Investment Group. The mezzanine loan, which is junior to the senior construction loan, had an original principal of $130 million but will eventually accrue to $360 million. Deutsche Bank purchased roughly one-quarter of the mezzanine loan, according to people familiar with the matter. The suit names the mezzanine lenders as defendants, including Fortress and its affiliates, Newcastle Investment Corp. and Drawbridge Special Opportunities Fund, as well as Dune Capital Management and Blackacre Institutional Capital Management, the real-estate arm of Cerberus Capital Management. Fortress didn't respond to a request for comment. The other lenders declined to comment. Unless sales of the condo and hotel units restart despite the worst housing market in generations, and quickly generate $400 million in new sales, it will be difficult for the project to pay off the mezzanine loan, which comes due in May 2009.