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15 résultats trouvés

  1. LE CARRÉ CENTRE-SUD Google streetview Current front of project (Centre street) [sTREETVIEW]https://www.google.com/lochp?ll=45.482803,-73.562272&spn=0.001676,0.004128&t=m&z=19&layer=c&cbll=45.482803,-73.562272&panoid=boTzyJLEYUHaiqVLz_c13A&cbp=12,308.91,,0,-6.84[/sTREETVIEW] [MAPS]https://www.google.com/lochp?ll=45.482942,-73.562423&spn=0.000592,0.001032&t=h&z=21[/MAPS]
  2. jesseps

    Skye Halifax

    http://inhabitat.com/skye-halifax-green-skyscrapers-to-be-the-tallest-towers-in-nova-scotia/
  3. MTLskyline

    General Motors

    In this thread I am going to dispel some myths about the build quality of General Motors products. Today, I'll start off with Buick and its new/upcoming models. The current Allure/LaCrosse will be replaced this year by the one I'm posting here. The Regal will make a return to North America and take the place of the Saturn Aura (with some Opel underpinnings). The Lucerne will be cut completely. Saturn looks like its on the way out over the next few years, so expect Buick to pick up where Saturn left off. BUICK 2010 Buick LaCrosse Base engine: 260 hp, 3.0L direct injected V6 Optional engine: 280-hp 3.6L direct injected V6 New Buick Regal (2010 or 2011) Buick Enclave (current model) 275-horsepower, 3.6-liter VVT V6
  4. jesseps

    Bye Bye Dubai?

    (Courtesy of Inhabitat) Now thats a hell of a thing, build million dollar buildings just to destroy them
  5. (Courtesy of Luxist) :eek: If I had $200 million. Not sure I would spend it on a condo maybe on a townhouse.
  6. TomOfBoston

    English CEGEP's

    Last week, Quebec gave some additional funding to 2 English CEGEP's (and one French CEGEP) to increase enrolment due to the application crunch. Mme. Courchesne stated that this was done so that anglophones could attend an anglophone CEGEP. The statement was later "clarified" that this applied only to the current crunch. Given that some in the PQ want English CEGEP's available only to Anglophones (although Pauline Marois is hesitant to endorse this), does anyone see the following scenario unfolding? English CEGEP's enrolment will be frozen at or near current levels. First priority for admission will be anglophones with a Certificate of Eligibility. Second priority for admission will be anglophone immigrants. Any remaining spaces would be available to other immigrants and francophones.
  7. DrFunk

    Si vous pouviez... If you could...

    Si vous pouviez choisir UN gratte-ciel dans le monde ne dépassant pas les alentours des 210m pour respecter la hauteur maximale permise et UN autre de votre choix peu importe la hauteur à ajouter au skyline de Montréal, lesquels seraient-ils? Et surtout, où les installeriez-vous? If you were allowed to choose ONE skyscraper in the world that does not go much over 210m in order to respect the current height restrictions and ONE other skyscraper of any height of your choice to add to the current Montreal skyline, which buildings would you choose? And where would you have them?
  8. About time. I really like those "test" street signs. They look great! I think I prefer the Green ones though. Green ones (from http://www.flickr.com/photos/montrealstreetsigns/460880559/)
  9. http://www.stat.gouv.qc.ca/donstat/societe/demographie/dons_regnl/regional/rmr_total.htm Since 1996, greater Montreal has grown by over 400,000 people. In this time, the regions of Quebec have grown by less than 60,000 people. How come Montreal does not get more representation in the National assembly, and why doesn't the current provincial govt in power (gets support from Montreal CMA) change the electoral map to consider this demographic shift.
  10. Surfing a River When the Wave Doesn’t Move Source: nytimes TO the uninitiated, the scene on a recent morning along the St. Lawrence River in Montreal might have inspired confusion. Behind the striking modular apartment complex known as Habitat 67, a crowd of surfers slipped into wet suits and waxed up their boards, 500 miles from the nearest ocean beach. They were preparing to surf a standing river wave in the St. Lawrence, where high-velocity water roars over a steep river-bottom depression, pitches back and upward, and creates a waist-to-overhead breaker. Surfers paddle into it or swing out by rope to catch the green-faced wedge, rewarded by a seemingly endless ride. “Once you’re carving, it’s exactly the same feel as on an ocean wave,” said Chris Dutton, the founder of the Web site SurfMontreal.com, “except that instead of going straight down the line, you carve a little bit, flip around, carve back, and can go all day.” Modern river surfing on standing waves evolved on the Eisbach River in Germany in the mid-1970s. Tidal bores have been ridden for years on the Severn in England; in Bordeaux, France; and on the Amazon. New standing waves are being pioneered almost daily in rivers in places like Colorado, and in Ontario and Alberta in Canada. Corran Addison, an Olympic kayaker and three-time world freestyle kayak champion, was the first to tackle the Habitat wave with a surfboard, in 2002. Mr. Addison’s river-surfing school, Imagine Surfboards, has taught 3,500 students since 2005, and has expanded to include a surf shop and board line. A second Montreal river-surfing school, KSF, has hosted 1,500 students a year since 2003. From fewer than 10 original surfers, Mr. Addison estimates the current participants to number around 500. The wave quality was low on my first day at Habitat 67, Mr. Addison, my instructor that day, explained. Instead of the usual method of getting into the wave — starting upstream and allowing the current to draw me into place — I would start downstream from the wave lying flat on the board, and use a rope to counter the river’s flow, swinging out into position, popping up into a surf stance, and then making my way into the wave. After scrambling down a steep embankment to the edge of the river, I got my first close-up look at the wave; a humplike wall of water surrounded by a torrent of rapids, with a lone surfer rocking back and forth just below the peak. The locals made the approach look fluid and easy. Of course, it wasn’t. Even with a wide, seven-foot-long “fun shape” board, all the forces — raging waters, the tension of the rope, my own weight — conspired against gaining balance and stability, and I lost the rope and was flushed down the rapids, repeatedly. Still, unlike at the ocean, where I would have faced a battering shore break and a lineup of experienced surfers anxious for the next set, all I had to do to try again was climb the riverbank and walk up the path. “In the river you’re going against the current — that dynamic itself makes it more complex,” said Costas Kanellos, a Montreal native who started river surfing in 2005 and has since taken to ocean surfing in Maine and Florida. “But having a consistent wave allows a lot of people to improve at a quicker rate than they would in the ocean.” Mr. Dutton was my instructor for my second crack at Habitat 67. First he demonstrated how to maximize the rope with body positioning: like a water skier angling far out from behind the boat, I had to remain upright to leverage the strength and weight of the torso as a counter to the force of the rope. In the water, Mr. Dutton had me start out on my knees, so I didn’t have to get up from a prone position. Despite the fatigue in my arms, I stood up, leaned with all my body weight, and carved away from the riverbank. Nearing the wave, I turned the board upstream and released the rope when I was inside the wave. A dense, solid but fluidly dynamic water surface rushed beneath my board. It was a moment of mild vertigo, depth and perspective hard to pinpoint in such an alien environment. I lasted a few fleeting seconds before washing out the back, long enough to feel the potential. When we left at 6 p.m., there was a five-person lineup forming, with a parking lot full of more surfers, off work and getting geared up. Though river surfing is in its infancy, the familiar complaints of overcrowding are already being heard. On a peak summer weekend with ideal river conditions and good weather, Mr. Addison said, the lineup can grow to 50 people. “The bad thing would be if surfing continues to grow in popularity,” he said, “and you show up in March to a 50-person lineup, never mind August.” Mr. Addison and others have turned to creating their own river waves using artificial obstacles. In 1997, he helped design a wave park in Valley Field, Quebec, now an Olympic kayak-training center. A similar whitewater park on the Arkansas River in Pueblo, Colo., has become a destination for river surfers. Mr. Addison proposes to use sunken concrete blocks to engineer four more standing waves in Montreal, at an estimated cost of 40,000 Canadian dollars each, though he has so far received little governmental or corporate support. “Ultimately,” he said, “we need more waves.” IF YOU GO Habitat 67 is at 2600 Avenue Pierre-Dupuy in Montreal. From Autoroute Bonaventure 10, take Avenue Pierre-Dupuy north. Park in the pull-off to the right, just past the street address. Walk behind tennis courts and down a dirt path; the wave itself is easy to spot, just down the embankment. Some information is online at http://www.surfmtl.com and http://www.surfmontreal.com. SURF SCHOOLS Imagine Surfboard, (514) 583-3386; http://www.imaginesurfboards.com/eng/surfschool.html. KSF School of River Surfing and Kayaking, (514) 595-7873; http://www.ksf.ca (in French).
  11. Montreal faces uphill battle in new economic order KONRAD YAKABUSKI Report on Business April 9, 2009 MONTREAL -- The Montreal Exchange, now part of TMX Group, is forwarding journalists' calls to Toronto. The new head of BCE Inc. has not taken up residence in the city that, officially anyway, is still home to the telecom giant's headquarters. Alcan's "head office" is shrinking under parent Rio Tinto. AbitibiBowater answers to its bankers in Charlotte, N.C. When Michael Sabia had a getting-to-know-you lunch last week with Quebec Inc.'s grands fromages, the new head of the Caisse de dépôt et placement du Québec found himself talking to a sparser crowd than any Caisse chief before him would have likely faced. The ranks of Quebec Inc., that Quiet Revolution embodiment of Quebec's French-speaking business class, are thinning. Where will this all leave Montreal if, as Creative Class guru Richard Florida recently predicted in The Atlantic magazine, "the coming decades will likely see a further clustering of output, jobs and innovation in a smaller number of bigger cities and city-regions"? Can Montreal aspire to be one of them? Or has its fate already been sealed? Prof. Florida, now director of the Martin Prosperity Institute at University of Toronto, warns that "we can't stop the decline of some places, and we would be foolish to try. ... In limited ways, we can help faltering cities to manage their decline better, and to sustain better lives for the people who stay in them." Let's be clear: Montreal is not Detroit. St. Jude himself could not save Motor City. The unemployment rate there now stands at 22 per cent. When only one in 10 Detroiters has a college degree, the jobless rate won't be coming down any time soon. If ever. The current economic crisis, as Prof. Florida notes, will "permanently and profoundly" alter the economic geography of North America. Montreal needs to get busy if it is to carve out a place for itself in this new economic order. It has a lot going for it: A vibrant inner city, a deep talent pool of "knowledge" workers, a diverse population and creativity to burn. Its problem is just that Toronto has even more of these things. Toronto also has the support of its provincial government. Montreal's provincial masters seem at best indifferent to it, if not chronically at war with it. How else do you explain why, despite decades of promises, the current Liberal government has yet to proceed with the construction of two new mega-hospitals in Montreal to replace a complex network of antiquated institutions spread over multiple sites? If the new hospitals do get built - delivery is now promised between 2013 and 2018 - will there even be enough doctors to work in them? Quebec pays its general practitioners and specialists about a quarter less than Ontario, and a new interprovincial labour mobility agreement will make it easier for them to practise elsewhere. But Montreal can't afford to lose any more of its "brain surgeons," regardless of their profession. In 1976, Montreal and Toronto had nearly identically sized populations, each with about 2.8 million people living within its Census Metropolitan Area (CMA). Since then, the population of the Toronto CMA has doubled to 5.6 million; Montreal has only managed to reach 3.7 million, a 30-per-cent increase in three decades. In its latest Metropolitan Outlook, the Conference Board of Canada predicted that Montreal will post the weakest growth of any major Canadian city over the next half-decade. Though its economy will not contract as much as Toronto's this year, Montreal's output will expand much more slowly once the recession lifts. Part of the explanation for this may lie in another report out this week, this one also supported by Conference Board data, on Toronto's status as a global city. Though the Toronto Board of Trade's Scorecard on Prosperity highlighted Toronto's shortcomings when compared to the 20 other cities studied, it provided even grimmer news for Montreal. Toronto ranked fourth over all. Calgary was first. Montreal was 13th, the poorest performance of any Canadian city on the list. There are grounds for optimism. The proposed Quartier des Spectacles - the redevelopment of a run-down downtown intersection into a hub for the arts - will help Montreal catch up, or at least decline more slowly relative to Toronto's now superior cultural infrastructure. But it's hard not to be disheartened when the top news story in city politics these days is how Mayor Gérald Tremblay's former right-hand man vacationed in the Caribbean on the yacht of a construction magnate just before the latter's consortium won a juicy municipal contract to install water meters. When this much energy gets absorbed in damage control, how much is left for the kind of creative thinking needed to ensure Montreal's position in Prof. Florida's new economic landscape? Or is it already too late for that? kyakabuski@globeandmail.com http://www.theglobeandmail.com/servlet/story/GAM.20090409.RYAKABUSKI09ART1924/TPStory/TPComment
  12. jesseps

    Street Food

    (Courtesy of Al Jazeera) Read the rest by clicking the link, plus there is a video.
  13. ErickMontreal

    Alberta's heritage savings fund hit hard

    Alberta's heritage savings fund hit hard The Canadian Press October 14, 2008 at 4:45 PM EDT Edmonton — Falling stock prices have sliced roughly $1 billion from Alberta's rainy-day savings account. Finance Minister Iris Evans told the legislature that the value of the Heritage Savings Trust Fund has been reduced to $16-billion — a drop of roughly 6 per cent since June. But she says the loss is only on paper because the province isn't selling any of the stocks that have lost value recently. Evans is promising a further update on the heritage fund at a public meeting Thursday in Edmonton and again in the second-quarter fiscal update next month. Premier Ed Stelmach has said there's nearly $8 billion set aside in a separate fund that will be used to maintain government programs at current levels if the economy falters. Mr. Stelmach said last week the province is not immune to current market fluctuations, but is “prepared to weather any storm.”
  14. Bonjour a tous, Mon employeur (CGI) recherche 50 agens au support à la clientèle pour travailler à leur bureaux au centre ville, c'est surtout au téléphone que ça se passe. Le salaire de base est de 16.25$ a l'heure plus avantages sociaux pour une job a temps plein. si vous êtes intéressés, laissez-le moi savoir, et je vais vous référer pour accélerer votre démarche. Merci, ------------------------------------------------------ Hi everyone, My current employer (CGI) is looking for 50 customer service agents, hourly base salary is 16.25$ for someone with no experience plus benefits. This is a full time job. If you are intrested, send me a PM so you can get properly reffered and expedite your candidacy. Good luck everyone
  15. Owens-Illinois closing Toronto glass container plant, Last Updated: Tuesday, July 29, 2008 | 9:02 AM ET The Canadian Press Owens-Illinois Inc. is closing its glass container plant in Toronto effective Sept. 30, affecting 430 workers. The company said Tuesday that the closure arises from an "ongoing review of its global manufacturing footprint," and the Toronto plant's production will be shifted to other factories, including sites in Brampton, Ont., and Montreal. "This closing was driven by our global asset utilization process which identified the opportunity to shift our production to other O-I North American facilities, resulting in lower energy consumption and production costs while still meeting current and anticipated market needs," stated Scott Murchison, president of the 24,000-employee company's North America glass containers division. "The market impacts of a strong Canadian dollar, high energy prices and the recent activities of the Liquor Control Board of Ontario were contributing factors."